2007 New Zealand local elections

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2007 New Zealand local elections
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  2004 13 October 2007 2010  

Triennial elections for all 73 cities and districts, twelve regional councils and all district health boards in New Zealand were held on 13 October 2007. Most councils were elected using the first-past-the-post voting method, but eight (of which Wellington City is the largest) were elected using single transferable vote.

Contents

Results

Candidates' advertising in Wellington NZLocalElectionsAdvertising.jpg
Candidates' advertising in Wellington

New mayors were elected in Auckland City, [1] North Shore City, Manukau City, Christchurch, [2] Rodney District, Whangarei, Far North District, [3] Nelson, [4] Taupo, Stratford, South Taranaki District and Buller District. [5]

Voter turnouts were generally lower than normal for local body elections in New Zealand. [6] [7]

Peter Chin was re-elected in the Dunedin mayoral election.

North Island

Northland Region
districtcouncillorscommunity
boards
regional
councillors
Mayorlink
Far North District 933Green check.svg Wayne Brown , (new)
Whangarei District 134 Stan Semenoff (new)
Kaipara District 101 Peter King , re-elected [ permanent dead link ]
Auckland Region
districtcouncillorscommunity
boards
regional
councillors
Mayorlink
Rodney District 121Green check.svg Penny Webster , re-elected
North Shore City 15662Red x.svg George Wood ,
defeated by Andrew Williams
Waitakere City 1442Green check.svg Bob Harvey , re-elected
Auckland City 1994Red x.svg Dick Hubbard ,
defeated by John Banks
Manukau City 1783Red x.svg Sir Barry Curtis , did not run.
Len Brown won
Papakura District 81 1 John Robertson
Franklin District 1221 1, 2 Mark Ball
1 Franklin and Papakura districts jointly elected one regional councillor. 2 The south part of Franklin District is in the Waikato Region.
Waikato region
districtcouncillorscommunity
boards
regional
councillors
Mayorlink
Waikato District 13423 Peter Harris
Hamilton City 134 Bob Simcock , new
Waipa District 1321 Alan Livingston
Matamata-Piako District 1131 Hugh Vercoe
Otorohanga District 721 4 Dale Williams
Waitomo District 61 4 Mark Ammon
South Waikato District 101 Neil Sinclair
Taupo District 122 5, 6 Clayton Stent
Hauraki District 131 John Tregidga
Thames-Coromandel District 851 Philippa Barriball
3 Waikato jointly elects one regional councillor with Franklin District and elects another in its own right. 4 Otorohanga and Waitomo districts jointly elect one regional councillor. 5 Parts of Taupo District are in the Bay of Plenty, Manawatū-Whanganui and Hawke's Bay Regions. 6 Elects two councillors jointly with Rotorua District.
Bay of Plenty Region 7
districtcouncillorscommunity
boards
regional
councillors
Mayorlink
Western Bay of Plenty District 1252 Graeme Weld
Tauranga District 104 Stuart Crosby
Rotorua District 1238 Kevin Winters
Whakatāne District 12229 Colin Holmes
Kawerau District 829 Malcolm Campbell
Opotiki District 11129 John Forbes
7 Three regional councillors are elected in three separate Māori wards. 8 in conjunction with part of Taupo District. 9 Whakatane, Kawerau and Opotiki districts jointly elect two regional councillors.

See also

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References

  1. Bernard Orsman (13 October 2007). "Banks ousts Hubbard". The New Zealand Herald . Retrieved 14 October 2007.
  2. Gay, Edward; Ihaka, James (13 October 2007). "New faces aplenty in local government shake-ups". The New Zealand Herald . Retrieved 15 April 2020.
  3. "Banks climbs back, Wood chopped down". Television New Zealand. 13 October 2007. Retrieved 14 October 2007.
  4. "Main Local Body election results". Newstalk ZB. 13 October 2007. Archived from the original on 16 October 2007. Retrieved 14 October 2007.
  5. "Changes in Far North, Whangarei, Taupo, Stratford and South Taranaki mayors". Radio New Zealand. 13 October 2007. Archived from the original on 7 February 2012. Retrieved 14 October 2007.
  6. "Majority of NZers didn't vote". Newstalk ZB. 13 October 2007. Archived from the original on 15 August 2007. Retrieved 14 October 2007.
  7. Lauren Owens (11 October 2007). "Laziness, apathy leads to dismal voter turnout". The New Zealand Herald . Retrieved 14 October 2007.