Thorndon (New Zealand electorate)

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Thorndon is a former parliamentary electorate in the city of Wellington, New Zealand from 1881 to 1890.

New Zealand electorates voting district for elections to the New Zealand Parliament

An electorate is a geographical constituency used for electing members to the New Zealand Parliament. In informal discussion, electorates are often called seats. The most formal description, electoral district, is used in legislation. The size of electorates is determined on a population basis such that all electorates have approximately the same population.

Wellington Capital city in New Zealand

Wellington is the capital city and second most populous urban area of New Zealand, with 418,500 residents. It is located at the south-western tip of the North Island, between Cook Strait and the Remutaka Range. Wellington is the major population centre of the southern North Island, and is the administrative centre of the Wellington Region, which also includes the Kapiti Coast and Wairarapa. Its latitude is 41°17′S, making it the world's southernmost capital of a sovereign state. Wellington features a temperate maritime climate, and is the world's windiest city by average wind speed.

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Population centres

The previous electoral redistribution was undertaken in 1875 for the 1875–76 election. In the six years since, New Zealand's European population had increased by 65%. In the 1881 electoral redistribution, the House of Representatives increased the number of European representatives to 91 (up from 84 since the 1875–76 election). The number of Māori electorates was held at four. The House further decided that electorates should not have more than one representative, which led to 35 new electorates being formed, including Thorndon, and two electorates that had previously been abolished to be recreated. This necessitated a major disruption to existing boundaries. [1]

1875–76 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1875–76 was held between 20 December 1875 and 29 January 1876 to elect a total of 88 MPs in 73 electorates to the 6th session of the New Zealand Parliament. The Māori vote was held on 4 and 15 January 1876. A total of 56,471 voters were registered.

New Zealand House of Representatives Sole chamber of New Zealand Parliament

The New Zealand House of Representatives is a component of the New Zealand Parliament, along with the Sovereign. The House passes all laws, provides ministers to form a Cabinet, and supervises the work of the Government. It is also responsible for adopting the state's budgets and approving the state's accounts.

The electorate was based on the inner-city suburb of Thorndon. The boundaries were defined as follows: [2]

Thorndon, New Zealand suburb of Wellington, New Zealand

Thorndon is a historic inner suburb of Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand. Because the suburb is relatively level compared to the hilly terrain elsewhere in Wellington it contained Wellington's elite residential area until its best was destroyed in the 1960s by a new motorway and the erection of tall office buildings on the sites of its Molesworth Street retail and service businesses.

The district is bounded towards the West, North, and East by the limits of the Borough of Wellington, to a point in line with the continuation of Taranaki Street, thence by that line and street to Taranaki Place; towards the South by Taranaki Place, Dixon Street, Woolcombe Street, Mount Street, the road leading to and by Upland Farm, to the boundary of the borough.

History

The Thorndon electorate was created for the 1881 election. [3] The previous multi-member electorates, including the two-member Wellington electorate, were abolished. The changes were the result of the Representation Act 1881. [2]

1881 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1881 was held on 8 and 9 December in the Māori and European electorates, respectively, to elect 95 MPs to the 8th session of the New Zealand Parliament.

Wellington, was a parliamentary electorate in Wellington, New Zealand. It existed from 1853 to 1905 with a break in the 1880s. It was a multi-member electorate. The electorate was represented, over the years, by 24 Members of Parliament.

William Levin [4] won the 1881 election against Thomas Dwan [5] by 772 votes to 228. [6] Since the 1879 election, Levin had represented the Wellington electorate. He resigned before the end of the parliamentary term 21 March 1884 due to ill health. [7]

William Levin New Zealand politician

William Hort (Willie) Levin was a 19th-century merchant, philanthropist and politician who lived in Wellington, New Zealand.

1879 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1879 was held between 28 August and 15 September 1879 to elect a total of 88 MPs to the 7th session of the New Zealand Parliament. The Māori vote was held on 8 September. A total of 82,271 (66.5%) European voters turned out to vote, plus 14,553 Māori voters. Following the election, John Hall formed a new government.

The resignation caused the 1884 by-election. At the nomination meeting, Thomas Dwan, Alfred Newman and Henry Bunny were proposed as candidates, with Dwan winning the show of hands. [8] At the election on 14 May 1884, Newman, Bunny and Dwan received 636, 379 and 121 votes, respectively. [9]

The 1884 Thorndon by-election was a by-election held on 13 May 1884 for the Wellington urban electorate of Thorndon during the 8th Parliament.

Alfred Newman (politician) New Zealand politician

Alfred Kingcome Newman was the mayor of Wellington, New Zealand, in 1909–1910, and a Member of Parliament.

Henry Bunny was a 19th-century Member of Parliament in the Wairarapa, New Zealand.

At the 1884 election, Newman was re-elected unopposed. [10] At the 1887 election, Newman beat William McLean by 873 to 425 votes. [11]

The Thorndon electorate was abolished at the end of the parliamentary term in 1890. [3] Newman successfully contested the Hutt electorate in the 1890 election. [12]

Election results

Thorndon was represented by two Members of Parliament. [3]

Key

  Independent   

ElectionsWinner
1881 election William Levin
1884 by-election Alfred Newman
1884 election
1887 election

Notes

  1. McRobie 1989, pp. 43–48.
  2. 1 2 "Representation Act 1881(45 VICT 1881 No 14)". New Zealand Legal Information Institute. Retrieved 8 May 2012.
  3. 1 2 3 Wilson 1985, p. 273.
  4. "The City Election". The Evening Post . XXII (129). 1 December 1881. p. 2. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  5. "Nomination of Members for General Assembly". Timaru Herald. XXXV (2246). 2 December 1881. p. 3. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  6. "Wellington". Hawera & Normanby Star. II (184). 12 December 1881. p. 1. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  7. Wilson 1985, p. 212.
  8. "Thorndon Election". The Evening Post . XXVII (106). 5 May 1884. p. 3. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  9. "The Thorndon Election". Daily Telegraph (3997). 14 May 1884. p. 3. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  10. "The Thorndon Seat". Manawatu Standard. IV (195). 15 July 1884. p. 3. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  11. "The General Election, 1887". National Library. 1887. p. 3. Retrieved 25 February 2012.
  12. Wilson 1985, p. 223.

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