Financial District, Manhattan

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Financial District
South Manhattan skyline - October 2013.JPG
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan viewed from New York Harbor, near the Statue of Liberty, October 2013
Location in New York City
Coordinates: 40°42′29″N74°00′40″W / 40.708°N 74.011°W / 40.708; -74.011 Coordinates: 40°42′29″N74°00′40″W / 40.708°N 74.011°W / 40.708; -74.011
Country Flag of the United States.svg  United States
State Flag of New York.svg  New York
City Flag of New York City.svg New York City
Borough Flag of New York County, New York.png Manhattan
Community District Manhattan 1 [1]
Area
[2]
  Total1.17 km2 (0.453 sq mi)
Population
 (2011) [2]
  Total57,627
  Density49,000/km2 (130,000/sq mi)
Economics
[2]
   Median income $125,565
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
ZIP codes
10004, 10005, 10006, 10038
Area code 212, 332, 646, and 917

The Financial District of Lower Manhattan, also known as FiDi, [3] is a neighborhood located on the southern tip of Manhattan island in New York City. It is bounded by the West Side Highway on the west, Chambers Street and City Hall Park on the north, Brooklyn Bridge on the northeast, the East River to the southeast, and The Battery on the south.

Lower Manhattan Central business district in New York, United States

Lower Manhattan, also known as Downtown Manhattan or Downtown New York, is the southernmost part of Manhattan, the central borough for business, culture, and government in the City of New York, which itself originated at the southern tip of Manhattan Island in 1624, at a point which now constitutes the present-day Financial District. The population of the Financial District alone has grown to an estimated 61,000 residents as of 2018, up from 43,000 as of 2014, which in turn was nearly double the 23,000 recorded at the 2000 Census.

Manhattan Borough in New York City and county in New York, United States

Manhattan, , is the most densely populated of the five boroughs of New York City, coextensive with New York County, one of the original counties of the U.S. state of New York. Manhattan serves as the city's economic and administrative center, cultural identifier, and historical birthplace. The borough consists mostly of Manhattan Island, bounded by the Hudson, East, and Harlem rivers; several small adjacent islands; and Marble Hill, a small neighborhood now on the U.S. mainland, physically connected to the Bronx and separated from the rest of Manhattan by the Harlem River. Manhattan Island is divided into three informally bounded components, each aligned with the borough's long axis: Lower, Midtown, and Upper Manhattan.

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States. With an estimated 2018 population of 8,398,748 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 19,979,477 people in its 2018 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 22,679,948 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

Contents

The City of New York was created in the Financial District in 1624, and the neighborhood roughly overlaps with the boundaries of the New Amsterdam settlement in the late 17th century. [4] The district comprises the offices and headquarters of many of the city's major financial institutions, including the New York Stock Exchange and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Anchored on Wall Street in the Financial District, New York City has been called both the most financially powerful city and the leading financial center of the world, [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] and the New York Stock Exchange is the world's largest stock exchange by total market capitalization. [10] [11] Several other major exchanges have or had headquarters in the Financial District, including the New York Mercantile Exchange, NASDAQ, the New York Board of Trade, and the former American Stock Exchange.

New Amsterdam historical Dutch colonial settlement that became New York City

New Amsterdam was a 17th-century Dutch settlement established at the southern tip of Manhattan Island that served as the seat of the colonial government in New Netherland. The factorij became a settlement outside Fort Amsterdam. The fort was situated on the strategic southern tip of the island of Manhattan and was meant to defend the fur trade operations of the Dutch West India Company in the North River. In 1624, it became a provincial extension of the Dutch Republic and was designated as the capital of the province in 1625.

17th century Century

The 17th century was the century that lasted from January 1, 1601, to December 31, 1700. It falls into the Early Modern period of Europe and in that continent was characterized by the Baroque cultural movement, the latter part of the Spanish Golden Age, the Dutch Golden Age, the French Grand Siècle dominated by Louis XIV, the Scientific Revolution, the world's first public company Dutch East India, and according to some historians, the General Crisis. The greatest military conflicts were the Thirty Years' War, the Great Turkish War, Mughal–Safavid Wars (Mughal–Safavid War, Mughal–Safavid War ), Mughal-Maratha Wars, and the Dutch-Portuguese War. It was during this period also that European colonization of the Americas began in earnest, including the exploitation of the silver deposits, which resulted in bouts of inflation as wealth was drawn into Europe.

New York Stock Exchange American stock exchange

The New York Stock Exchange is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$30.1 trillion as of February 2018. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.

The Financial District is part of Manhattan Community District 1 and its primary ZIP Codes are 10004, 10005, 10006, and 10038. [1] It is patrolled by the 1st Precinct of the New York City Police Department.

Manhattan Community Board 1

The Manhattan Community Board 1 is a New York City community board encompassing the neighborhoods of Battery Park City, the Financial District, the South Street Seaport, and TriBeCa in Lower Manhattan in the borough of Manhattan as well as Liberty Island, Ellis Island and Governors Island. It is bounded by Baxter Street, Pearl Street, the Brooklyn Bridge and the East River on the east, Upper New York Bay on the south, the Hudson River on the west and Canal Street on the north.

A ZIP Code is a postal code used by the United States Postal Service (USPS). Introduced in 1963, the basic format consists of five digits. In 1983, an extended ZIP+4 code was introduced; it includes the five digits of the ZIP Code, followed by a hyphen and four digits that designate a more specific location.

New York City Police Department Municipal police force in the United States

The New York City Police Department (NYPD), officially the City of New York Police Department, is the primary law enforcement and investigation agency within the City of New York. Established on May 23, 1845, the NYPD is one of the oldest police departments in the United States, and is the largest police force in the United States. The NYPD headquarters is at 1 Police Plaza, located on Park Row in Lower Manhattan across the street from City Hall. The department's mission is to "enforce the laws, preserve the peace, reduce fear, and provide for a safe environment." The NYPD's regulations are compiled in title 38 of the New York City Rules. The New York City Transit Police and New York City Housing Authority Police Department were fully integrated into the NYPD in 1995 by New York City Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani.

Description

The Financial District encompasses roughly the area south of City Hall Park in Lower Manhattan but excludes Battery Park and Battery Park City. The former World Trade Center complex was located in the neighborhood until the September 11, 2001 attacks; the neighborhood includes the successor One World Trade Center. The heart of the Financial District is often considered to be the corner of Wall Street and Broad Street, both of which are contained entirely within the district. [12] The northeastern part of the financial district (along Fulton Street and John Street) was known in the early 20th century as the Insurance District, due to the large number of insurance companies that were either headquartered there, or maintained their New York offices there.

City Hall Park park in New York City, United States of America

City Hall Park is a public park surrounding New York's City Hall in the Civic Center of Manhattan.

Battery Park City Neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City

Battery Park City is a mainly residential 92-acre (37 ha) planned community on the west side of the southern tip of the island of Manhattan in New York City. It is bounded by the Hudson River on the west, the Hudson River shoreline on the north and south, and the West Side Highway on the east.

World Trade Center (1973–2001) Former skyscraper complex in Manhattan, New York

The original World Trade Center was a large complex of seven buildings in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City, United States. It opened on April 4, 1973, and was destroyed in 2001 during the September 11 attacks. At the time of their completion, the Twin Towers — the original 1 World Trade Center, at 1,368 feet (417 m); and 2 World Trade Center, at 1,362 feet (415.1 m)—were the tallest buildings in the world. Other buildings in the complex included the Marriott World Trade Center, 4 WTC, 5 WTC, 6 WTC, and 7 WTC. The complex contained 13,400,000 square feet (1,240,000 m2) of office space.

Although the term is sometimes used as a synonym for Wall Street , the latter term is often applied metonymously to the financial markets as a whole (and is also a street in the district), whereas "the Financial District" implies an actual geographical location. The Financial District is part of Manhattan Community Board 1, which also includes five other neighborhoods (Battery Park City, Civic Center, Greenwich South, Seaport, and Tribeca). [1]

Wall Street Street in Manhattan, New York

Wall Street is an eight-block-long street running roughly northwest to southeast from Broadway to South Street, at the East River, in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan in New York City. Over time, the term has become a metonym for the financial markets of the United States as a whole, the American financial services industry, or New York–based financial interests.

Civic Center, Manhattan neighborhood in New York City

The Civic Center is the area of lower Manhattan, New York City, that encompasses New York City Hall, One Police Plaza, the courthouses in Foley Square, the Metropolitan Correction Center and the surrounding area. The district is bound on the west by Tribeca at Broadway, on the north by Chinatown at Worth Street or Bayard Street, on the east by the East River and the Brooklyn Bridge at South Street, and on the south by the Financial District at Ann Street.

South Street Seaport United States historic place

The South Street Seaport is a historic area in the New York City borough of Manhattan, centered where Fulton Street meets the East River, and adjacent to the Financial District. The Seaport is a designated historic district, and is distinct from the neighboring Financial District. It is part of Manhattan Community Board 1 in Lower Manhattan, and is bounded by the Financial District to the west, southwest, and north; the East River to the southeast; and Two Bridges to the northeast.

Architecture

The Financial District's architecture is generally rooted in the Gilded Age, though there are also some art deco influences in the neighborhood. The area is distinguished by narrow streets, a steep topography, and high-rises [13] Construction in such narrow steep areas has resulted in occasional accidents such as a crane collapse. [14] One report divided lower Manhattan into three basic districts: [13]

Gilded Age era in the history of the USA between the late 1860s and the 1890s

The Gilded Age in United States history is an era that occurred during the late 19th century, from the 1870s to about 1900. The term for this period came into use in the 1920s and 1930s and was derived from writer Mark Twain's and Charles Dudley Warner's 1873 novel The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today, which satirized an era of serious social problems masked by a thin gold gilding. The early half of the Gilded Age roughly coincided with the middle portion of the Victorian era in Britain and the Belle Époque in France. Its beginning, in the years after the American Civil War, overlaps the Reconstruction Era. It was followed in the 1890s by the Progressive Era.

  1. The Financial District proper—particularly along John Street
  2. South of the World Trade Center area—the handful of blocks south of the World Trade Center along Greenwich, Washington and West Streets
  3. Seaport district—characterized by century-old low-rise buildings and South Street Seaport; the seaport is "quiet, residential, and has an old world charm" according to one description. [13]
The Chamber of Commerce Building at 65 Liberty Street, one of many historical buildings in the district Chamber of Commerce Building (New York City).jpg
The Chamber of Commerce Building at 65 Liberty Street, one of many historical buildings in the district

Federal Hall National Memorial, on the site of the first U.S. capitol and the first inauguration of George Washington as the first President of the United States, is located at the corner of Wall Street and Nassau Street.

The Financial District has a number of tourist attractions such as the South Street Seaport Historic District, newly renovated Pier 17, the New York City Police Museum, and Museum of American Finance. National Museum of the American Indian, Trinity Church, St. Paul's Chapel, and the famous bull. Bowling Green is the starting point of traditional ticker-tape parades on Broadway, where here it is also known as the Canyon of Heroes. The Museum of Jewish Heritage and the Skyscraper Museum are both in adjacent Battery Park City which is also home to the Brookfield Place (formerly World Financial Center).

Another key anchor for the area is the New York Stock Exchange. City authorities realize its importance, and believed that it has "outgrown its neoclassical temple at the corner of Wall and Broad streets", and in 1998 offered substantial tax incentives to try to keep it in the Financial District. [15] Plans to rebuild it were delayed by the September 11, 2001 attacks. [15] The exchange still occupies the same site. The exchange is the locus for a large amount of technology and data. For example, to accommodate the three thousand persons who work directly on the Exchange floor requires 3,500 kilowatts of electricity, along with 8,000 phone circuits on the trading floor alone, and 200 miles of fiber-optic cable below ground. [16]

Surrounding neighborhood

During most of the 20th century, the Financial District was a business community with practically only offices which emptied out at night. A report in The New York Times in 1961 described a "deathlike stillness that settles on the district after 5:30 and all day Saturday and Sunday". [17] But there has been a change towards greater residential use of the area, pushed forwards by technological changes and shifting market conditions. The general pattern is for several hundred thousand workers to commute into the area during the day, sometimes by sharing a taxicab [18] from other parts of the city as well as from New Jersey and Long Island, and then leave at night. In 1970 only 833 people lived "south of Chambers Street"; by 1990, 13,782 people were residents with the addition of areas such as Battery Park City [19] and Southbridge Towers. [20] Battery Park City was built on 92 acres of landfill, and 3,000 people moved there beginning about 1982, but by 1986 there was evidence of more shops and stores and a park, along with plans for more residential development. [21]

The Financial District area from Brooklyn. The South Street Seaport is at the lower middle, a little to the right Lower Manhattan by night.jpg
The Financial District area from Brooklyn. The South Street Seaport is at the lower middle, a little to the right

According to one description in 1996, "The area dies at night ... It needs a neighborhood, a community." [20] During the past two decades there has been a shift towards greater residential living areas in the Financial District, with incentives from city authorities in some instances. [19] Many empty office buildings have been converted to lofts and apartments; for example, the office building of Harry Sinclair, the oil magnate involved with the Teapot Dome scandal, was converted to a co-op in 1979. [20] In 1996, a fifth of buildings and warehouses were empty, and many were converted to living areas. [20] Some conversions met with problems, such as aging gargoyles on building exteriors having to be expensively restored to meet with current building codes. [20] Residents in the area have sought to have a supermarket, a movie theater, a pharmacy, more schools, and a "good diner". [20] The discount retailer named Job Lot used to be located at the World Trade Center but moved to Church Street; merchants bought extra unsold items at steep prices and sold them as a discount to consumers, and shoppers included "thrifty homemakers and browsing retirees" who "rubbed elbows with City Hall workers and Wall Street executives"; but the firm went bust in 1993. [22]

There were reports that the number of residents increased by 60% during the 1990s to about 25,000 [19] although a second estimate (based on the 2000 census based on a different map) places the residential population in 2000 at 12,042. [17] By 2001 there were several grocery stores, dry cleaners, and two grade schools and a top high school. [19] There is also a long-standing a barber shop across from the New York Stock Exchange. [23] Additionally, there were more signs of dogwalkers at night and a 24-hour neighborhood, although the general pattern of crowds during the working hours and emptiness at night was still apparent. [17] There were also ten hotels and thirteen museums. [17] Stuyvesant High School moved to its present location near Battery Park City in 1992 and has been described as one of the nation's premier high schools with emphasis on science and mathematics. [17] In 2007 the French fashion retailer Hermès opened a store in the financial district to sell items such as a "$4,700 custom-made leather dressage saddle or a $47,000 limited edition alligator briefcase". [24] However, there are reports of panhandlers like elsewhere in the city. [25] By 2010 the residential population had increased to 24,400 residents. [26] and the area was growing with luxury high-end apartments and upscale retailers. [27]

Street grid

Street grid as seen from the air in 2009 Lower Manhattan Aerial.JPG
Street grid as seen from the air in 2009

The streets in the area were laid out prior to the Commissioners' Plan of 1811, a grid plan that dictates the placement of most of Manhattan's streets north of Houston Street. Thus, it has small streets "barely wide enough for a single lane of traffic are bordered on both sides by some of the tallest buildings in the city", according to one description, which creates "breathtaking artificial canyons" offering spectacular views in some instances. [13] Some streets have been designated as pedestrian-only with vehicular traffic prohibited. [24]

Tourism

The Financial District is a major location of tourism in New York City. One report described lower Manhattan as "swarming with camera-carrying tourists". [28] Tour guides highlight places such as Trinity Church, the Federal Reserve gold vaults 80 feet below street level (worth $100 billion), and the NYSE. [29] A Scoundrels of Wall Street Tour is a walking historical tour which includes a museum visit and discussion of various financiers "who were adept at finding ways around finance laws or loopholes through them". [30] Occasionally artists make impromptu performances; for example, in 2010, a troupe of 22 dancers "contort their bodies and cram themselves into the nooks and crannies of the Financial District in Bodies in Urban Spaces" choreographed by Willi Donner. [31] One chief attraction, the Federal Reserve Building in lower Manhattan, paid $750,000 to open a visitors' gallery in 1997. [28] The New York Stock Exchange and the American Stock Exchange also spent money in the late 1990s to upgrade facilities for visitors. [28] Attractions include the gold vault beneath the Federal Reserve and that "staring down at the trading floor was as exciting as going to the Statue of Liberty". [28]

Demographics

For census purposes, the New York City government classifies the Financial District as part of a larger neighborhood tabulation area called Battery Park City-Lower Manhattan. [32] Based on data from the 2010 United States Census, the population of Battery Park City-Lower Manhattan was 39,699, an increase of 19,611 (97.6%) from the 20,088 counted in 2000. Covering an area of 479.77 acres (194.16 ha), the neighborhood had a population density of 82.7 inhabitants per acre (52,900/sq mi; 20,400/km2). [33] The racial makeup of the neighborhood was 65.4% (25,965) White, 3.2% (1,288) African American, 0.1% (35) Native American, 20.2% (8,016) Asian, 0.0% (17) Pacific Islander, 0.4% (153) from other races, and 3.0% (1,170) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.7% (3,055) of the population. [34]

The entirety of Community District 1, which comprises the Financial District and other Lower Manhattan neighborhoods, had 63,383 inhabitants as of NYC Health's 2018 Community Health Profile, with an average life expectancy of 85.8 years. [35] :2, 20 This is higher than the median life expectancy of 81.2 for all New York City neighborhoods. [36] :53 (PDF p. 84) [37] Most inhabitants are young to middle-aged adults: half (50%) are between the ages of 25–44, while 14% are between 0–17, and 18% between 45–64. The ratio of college-aged and elderly residents was lower, at 11% and 7% respectively. [35] :2

As of 2017, the median household income in Community Districts 1 and 2 (including Greenwich Village and SoHo) was $144,878, [38] though the median income in the Financial District individually was $125,565. [2] In 2018, an estimated 9% of Financial District and Lower Manhattan residents lived in poverty, compared to 14% in all of Manhattan and 20% in all of New York City. One in twenty-five residents (4%) were unemployed, compared to 7% in Manhattan and 9% in New York City. Rent burden, or the percentage of residents who have difficulty paying their rent, is 38% in Financial District and Lower Manhattan, compared to the boroughwide and citywide rates of 45% and 51% respectively. Based on this calculation, as of 2018, Financial District and Lower Manhattan are considered high-income relative to the rest of the city and not gentrifying. [35] :7

The population of the Financial District has grown to an estimated 61,000 residents as of 2018, [39] up from 43,000 as of 2014, which in turn was nearly double the 23,000 recorded at the 2000 Census. [40]

Police and crime

Financial District and Lower Manhattan are patrolled by the 1st Precinct of the NYPD, located at 16 Ericsson Place. [41] The 1st Precinct ranked 63rd safest out of 69 patrol areas for per-capita crime in 2010. Though the number of crimes is low compared to other NYPD precincts, the residential population is also much lower. [42] With a non-fatal assault rate of 24 per 100,000 people, Financial District and Lower Manhattan's rate of violent crimes per capita is less than that of the city as a whole. The incarceration rate of 152 per 100,000 people is lower than that of the city as a whole. [35] :8

The 1st Precinct has a lower crime rate than in the 1990s, with crimes across all categories having decreased by 86.3% between 1990 and 2018. The precinct saw 1 murder, 23 rapes, 80 robberies, 61 felony assaults, 85 burglaries, 1,085 grand larcenies, and 21 grand larcenies auto in 2018. [43]

Fire safety

The Financial District is served by three New York City Fire Department (FDNY) fire stations: [44]

Health

Preterm and teenage births are less common in Financial District and Lower Manhattan than in other places citywide. In Financial District and Lower Manhattan, there were 77 preterm births per 1,000 live births (compared to 87 per 1,000 citywide), and 2.2 teenage births per 1,000 live births (compared to 19.3 per 1,000 citywide), though the teenage birth rate is based on a small sample size. [35] :11 Financial District and Lower Manhattan have a low population of residents who are uninsured. In 2018, this population of uninsured residents was estimated to be 4%, less than the citywide rate of 12%, though this was based on a small sample size. [35] :14

The concentration of fine particulate matter, the deadliest type of air pollutant, in Financial District and Lower Manhattan is 0.0096 milligrams per cubic metre (9.6×10−9 oz/cu ft), more than the city average. [35] :9 Sixteen percent of Financial District and Lower Manhattan residents are smokers, which is more than the city average of 14% of residents being smokers. [35] :13 In Financial District and Lower Manhattan, 4% of residents are obese, 3% are diabetic, and 15% have high blood pressure, the lowest rates in the city—compared to the citywide averages of 24%, 11%, and 28% respectively. [35] :16 In addition, 5% of children are obese, the lowest rate in the city, compared to the citywide average of 20%. [35] :12

Ninety-six percent of residents eat some fruits and vegetables every day, which is more than the city's average of 87%. In 2018, 88% of residents described their health as "good," "very good," or "excellent," more than the city's average of 78%. [35] :13 For every supermarket in Financial District and Lower Manhattan, there are 6 bodegas. [35] :10

The nearest major hospital is NewYork-Presbyterian Lower Manhattan Hospital in the Civic Center area. [48] [49]

Post offices and ZIP codes

Financial District is located within several ZIP Codes. The largest ZIP Codes are 10004, centered around the Battery; 10005, around Wall Street; 10006, around the World Trade Center; 10007, around City Hall; and 10038, around South Street Seaport. There are also several smaller ZIP Codes spanning one block, including 10045 around the Federal Reserve Bank; 10271 around the Equitable Building; and 10279 around the Woolworth Building. [50]

The United States Postal Service operates four post offices in the Financial District:

Education

Financial District and Lower Manhattan generally have a higher rate of college-educated residents than the rest of the city. The vast majority of residents age 25 and older (84%) have a college education or higher, while 4% have less than a high school education and 12% are high school graduates or have some college education. By contrast, 64% of Manhattan residents and 43% of city residents have a college education or higher. [35] :6 The percentage of Financial District and Lower Manhattan students excelling in math rose from 61% in 2000 to 80% in 2011, and reading achievement increased from 66% to 68% during the same time period. [55]

Financial District and Lower Manhattan's rate of elementary school student absenteeism is lower than the rest of New York City. In Financial District and Lower Manhattan, 6% of elementary school students missed twenty or more days per school year, less than the citywide average of 20%. [36] :24 (PDF p. 55) [35] :6 Additionally, 96% of high school students in Financial District and Lower Manhattan graduate on time, more than the citywide average of 75%. [35] :6

Schools

Leadership and Public Service High School Leadership HS 01.jpg
Leadership and Public Service High School

The New York City Department of Education operates the following public schools in the Financial District: [56]

Libraries

The New York Public Library (NYPL) operates two branches nearby. The New Amsterdam branch is located at 9 Murray Street near Broadway. It was established on the ground floor of an office building in 1989. [63] The Battery Park City branch is located at 175 North End Avenue near Murray Street. Completed in 2010, the two-story branch is NYPL's first LEED-certified branch. [64]

Transportation

The following New York City Subway stations are located in the Financial District: [65]

The largest transit hub, Fulton Center, was completed in 2014 after a $1.4 billion reconstruction project necessitated by the September 11, 2001 attacks, and involves at least five different sets of platforms. This transit hub was expected to serve 300,000 daily riders as of late 2014. [66] The World Trade Center Transportation Hub and PATH station opened in 2016. [67]

MTA Regional Bus Operations also operates several bus routes in the Financial District, namely the M15 , M20 , M15 SBS , M55 and M103 routes running north-south through the area, and the M9 and M22 routes running west-east through the area. There are also many MTA express bus routes running through the Financial District. [68] The Lower Manhattan Development Corporation operates a free shuttle bus, the Downtown Connection, which circulates around the Financial District during the daytime. [69]

Ferry services are also concentrated downtown, including the Staten Island Ferry at the Whitehall Terminal, NYC Ferry at Pier 11/Wall Street (and Battery Park City Ferry Terminal starting in 2020), and service to Governors Island at the Battery Maritime Building. [70]

Tallest buildings

NameImageHeight
ft (m)
FloorsYearNotes
One World Trade Center One World Trade Center cropped2.jpg 1,776 (541.3)1042014Is the sixth-tallest building in the world and the tallest building in the United States since its topping out on May 10, 2013. It is also the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere and the tallest all-office building in the world. [71] [72]
3 World Trade Center Three World Trade Center, New York, NY.jpg 1,079 (329)802018Mixed use; opened in 2018. [73]
4 World Trade Center 4 WTC May 17 2013.jpg 978 (298)742013Third-tallest building at the rebuilt World Trade Center and in the Financial District. The building opened to tenants in 2013. [74]
70 Pine Street AIB-NYC-gp.jpg 952 (290)661932 22nd-tallest building in the United States; formerly known as the American International Building and the Cities Service Building [75] [76] 70 Pine is being transformed into a residential skyscraper with 644 rental residences, 132 hotel rooms and 35,000 square feet of retail [77]
30 Park Place 99 Church St from west jeh.jpg 937 (286)822016Four Seasons Private Residences and Hotel. Topped-out in 2015 and completed in 2016. [78]
40 Wall Street 40 Wall Street New York City at Sunset C R.jpg 927 (283)701930 26th-tallest in the United States; was world's tallest building for less than two months in 1930; formerly known as the Bank of Manhattan Trust Building; also known as 40 Wall Street [79] [80]
28 Liberty Street One Chase Manhattan Plaza 1.jpg 813 (248)601961 [81] [82]
50 West Street 50 West Street 23 Oct 2015.png 778 (237)632016 [83] [84]
200 West Street GoldmanSachsHeadquarters.JPG 749 (228)442010Also known as Goldman Sachs World Headquarters [85] [86]
60 Wall Street 60 Wall Street building.jpg 745 (227)551989Also known as Deutsche Bank Building [87] [88]
One Liberty Plaza 0013TIARA P1000433.JPG 743 (226)541973Formerly known as the U.S. Steel Building [89] [90]
20 Exchange Place 20 Exchange Place Tower 111.JPG 741 (226)571931Formerly known as the City Bank-Farmers Trust Building [91] [92]
200 Vesey Street World Financial Center.jpg 739 (225)511986Also known as Three World Financial Center [93] [94]
HSBC Bank Building WSTM Mark Frank 0086.jpg 688 (210)521967Also known as Marine Midland Building [95] [96]
55 Water Street 55 Water Street with north wing.JPG 687 (209)531972 [97] [98]
1 Wall Street 1 Wall Street.jpg 654 (199)501931Also known as Bank of New York Mellon Building [99] [100]
225 Liberty Street World Financial Center.jpg 645 (197)441987Also known as Two World Financial Center [101] [102]
1 New York Plaza One New York Plaza.jpg 640 (195)501969 [103] [104]
Home Insurance Plaza WSTM-CornFedChicks0080.JPG 630 (192)451966 [105] [106]

See also

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Midtown Manhattan is the central portion of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. Midtown is home to some of the city's most iconic buildings, including the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, the Hudson Yards Redevelopment Project, the headquarters of the United Nations, Grand Central Terminal, and Rockefeller Center, as well as Broadway and Times Square.

Tribeca Neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City

Tribeca, properly written as TriBeCa, is a neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City. Its name is a syllabic abbreviation of "Triangle Below Canal Street". The "triangle", or more accurately, a trapezoid, is bounded by Canal Street, West Street, Broadway, and Chambers Street. More recently, a common marketing tactic has been to extend Tribeca's southern boundary to either Vesey or Murray Streets to increase the appeal of property listings.

40 Wall Street Office skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

40 Wall Street, also known as the Trump Building, is a 71-story neo-gothic skyscraper between Nassau Street and William Street in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City. Erected by The Manhattan Company as its headquarters, the building was originally known as the Bank of Manhattan Trust Building, and also as the Manhattan Company Building, until its founding tenant merged to form the Chase Manhattan Bank. The structure was completed in 1930 after 11 months of construction.

28 Liberty Street Skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

28 Liberty Street, formerly known as One Chase Manhattan Plaza, is a banking skyscraper located in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City, between Pine, Liberty, Nassau, and William Streets. Construction on the building was completed in 1961. It has 60 floors, with 5 basement floors, and is 813 feet (248 m) tall, making it the 26th tallest building in New York City, the 43rd tallest in the United States, and the 200th tallest building in the world.

200 Vesey Street Office skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

200 Vesey Street, formerly known as Three World Financial Center and also known as American Express Tower, is a skyscraper in Lower Manhattan, New York City. Located on West Street between Liberty Street and Vesey Street, the 739-foot (225 m) building is the tallest in the Brookfield Place complex. It is similar in design to 225 Liberty Street, except that it is capped by a solid pyramid whereas 225 Liberty is capped by a dome.

Architecture of New York City

The building form most closely associated with New York City is the skyscraper, which has shifted many commercial and residential districts from low-rise to high-rise. Surrounded mostly by water, the city has amassed one of the largest and most varied collection of skyscrapers in the world.

20 Exchange Place Residential skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

20 Exchange Place is a 57-story Art Deco building in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City, United States. Formerly known as the City Bank-Farmers Trust Building, it was built between 1930 and 1931, for the newly merged National City Bank of New York and the Farmers' Loan and Trust Company, predecessor firms of Citigroup. It remained the company's headquarters until 1956 and was ultimately sold in 1979.

Community boards of Manhattan

Community boards of Manhattan are New York City community boards in the borough of Manhattan, which are the appointed advisory groups of the community districts that advise on land use and zoning, participate in the city budget process, and address service delivery in their district.

50 West Street Skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

50 West Street is a 64-story, 778 ft (237 m) tall mixed-use retail and residential condominium tower developed by Time Equities Inc. in Lower Manhattan, New York City. It contains 191 residential units.

55 Water Street Office skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

55 Water Street is a 687-foot-tall (209 m) skyscraper in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City, on the East River. The 53-story, 3.5-million-square-foot (325,000 m2) structure was completed in 1972. It is tied with two other buildings, 277 Park Avenue and 5 Beekman Street, as the 73rd tallest building in New York. Emery Roth & Sons designed the building, which was the largest office building in the world when completed, and is still the largest in New York by floor area. In an arrangement with the Office of Lower Manhattan Development, it was built on a superblock created from four adjoining city blocks, suppressing the western part of Front Street.

26 Broadway Office skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

26 Broadway, also known as the Standard Oil Building, is a 31-story, 520-foot-tall (160 m) landmarked office building located at Bowling Green in the Financial District of New York City. As of 2017, the structure is the 220th tallest building in New York City and the 650th tallest building in the United States. 26 Broadway was also the home address in the late 18th century of Alexander Hamilton, his wife Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, and their family.

8 Spruce Street Residential skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

8 Spruce Street, originally known as Beekman Tower and currently marketed as New York by Gehry, is a 76-story skyscraper designed by architect Frank Gehry in the New York City borough of Manhattan at 8 Spruce Street, between William and Nassau Streets, in Lower Manhattan, just south of City Hall Park and the Brooklyn Bridge.

References

Notes

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