Marion County, Missouri

Last updated

Marion County
Marion County MO courthouse Palmyra-001.jpg
Marion County courthouse in Palmyra
Map of Missouri highlighting Marion County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Missouri
Missouri in United States.svg
Missouri's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 39°49′N91°37′W / 39.81°N 91.62°W / 39.81; -91.62
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Missouri.svg  Missouri
FoundedDecember 23, 1826
Named for Francis Marion
Seat Palmyra
Largest city Hannibal
Area
  Total444 sq mi (1,150 km2)
  Land437 sq mi (1,130 km2)
  Water7.4 sq mi (19 km2)  1.7%
Population
 (2010)
  Total28,781
  Estimate 
(2018)
28,592
  Density65/sq mi (25/km2)
Time zone UTC−6 (Central)
  Summer (DST) UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district 6th
Website http://marioncountymo.com/

Marion County is a county located in the northeastern portion of Missouri. As of the 2010 census, the population was 28,781. [1] Its county seat is Palmyra. [2] Unique from most third-class counties in the state, Marion has two county courthouses, the second located in Hannibal. [3] The county was organized on December 23, 1826 [4] [5] and named for General Francis Marion, the "Swamp Fox," who was from South Carolina and served in the American Revolutionary War. [6] The area was known as the "Two Rivers Country" before organization.

Contents

Marion County is part of the Hannibal, Missouri Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Quincy-Hannibal, IL-MO Combined Statistical Area.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 444 square miles (1,150 km2), of which 437 square miles (1,130 km2) is land, and 7.4 square miles (19 km2) (1.7%) is water. [7]

Adjacent counties

Major Roadways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1830 4,837
1840 9,62398.9%
1850 12,23027.1%
1860 18,83854.0%
1870 23,78026.2%
1880 24,8374.4%
1890 26,2335.6%
1900 26,3310.4%
1910 30,57216.1%
1920 30,226−1.1%
1930 33,49310.8%
1940 31,576−5.7%
1950 29,765−5.7%
1960 29,522−0.8%
1970 28,121−4.7%
1980 28,6381.8%
1990 27,682−3.3%
2000 28,2892.2%
2010 28,7811.7%
2020 28,525−0.9%
U.S. Decennial Census [8]
1790-1960 [9] 1900-1990 [10]
1990-2000 [11] 2010-2015 [1]

As of the census [12] of 2010, there were 28,781 people, 11,066 households, and 7,524 families residing in the county. The population density was 65 people per square mile (25/km2). There were 12,443 housing units at an average density of 28 per square mile (11/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 93.26% White, 4.62% Black or African American, 0.27% Native American, 0.28% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 0.18% from other races, and 1.32% from two or more races. Approximately 0.89% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 28.5% were German, 25.6% American, 11.0% Irish, and 10.3% English ancestry.

There were 11,066 households, out of which 33.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.50% were married couples living together, 11.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.00% were non-families. 28.10% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44, and the average family size was 2.98.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.70% under the age of 18, 9.50% from 18 to 24, 26.40% from 25 to 44, 21.70% from 45 to 64, and 16.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,774, and the median income for a family was $41,290. Males had a median income of $30,935 versus $20,591 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,964. About 9.30% of families and 12.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.30% of those under age 18 and 10.50% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Public schools

Private schools

Post-secondary

Public libraries

Hannibal Free Public Library [13]

Politics

Marion County, Missouri
Elected countywide officials
Assessor Mark Novak Democratic
Circuit Clerk Valerie Munzlinger (Division I) / Carolyn Conners (Division II) Democratic
County Clerk Valerie Dornberger Democratic
Collector Mary Ann Viorel Democratic
Commissioner
(Presiding)
Lyndon Bode Democratic
Commissioner
(District 1)
Robert Heiser Democratic
Commissioner
(District 2)
Randy Spratt Republican
Coroner Rick Jones Republican
Prosecuting Attorney Thomas P. Redington Democratic
Public Administrator Wendy Howe Democratic
Recorder Janet Dearing Democratic
Sheriff Jimmy Shinn Republican
Surveyor John D. Janes Independent
Treasurer Joelle Fohey Democratic

State

Past Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 65.84%8,48431.86% 4,1052.30% 297
2012 53.03%6,38044.83% 5,3942.14% 257
2008 58.82%7,34139.77% 4,9641.41% 176
2004 67.03%8,29231.77% 3,9301.20% 148
2000 50.05%5,83248.88% 5,6961.07% 125
1996 31.55% 3,38866.68%7,1611.78% 191

Marion County is in Missouri's 5th district in the Missouri House of Representatives, represented by Lindell F. Shumake (R-Hannibal).

Missouri House of Representatives — District 5 — Marion County (2016)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Lindell F. Shumake9,53274.88%+0.24
Democratic O.C. Latta3,19725.12%-0.24
Missouri House of Representatives — District 5 — Marion County (2014)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Lindell F. Shumake5,08974.64%+12.30
Democratic C. Leroy Deichman1,72925.36%-12.30
Missouri House of Representatives — District 5 — Marion County (2012)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Lindell F. Shumake7,44562.34%
Democratic Tom Shively4,49737.66%

All of Marion County is a part of Missouri's 18th District in the Missouri Senate; it is represented by Brian Munzlinger (R-Williamstown).

Missouri Senate — District 18 — Marion County (2014)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Brian Munzlinger5,630100.00%

Federal

U.S. Senate — Missouri — Marion County (2016)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Roy Blunt8,23964.11%+11.46
Democratic Jason Kander4,11532.02%-11.77
Libertarian Jonathan Dine2772.16%-1.40
Green Johnathan McFarland1281.00%+1.00
Constitution Fred Ryman930.72%+0.72
U.S. Senate — Missouri — Marion County (2012)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Todd Akin6,35052.65%
Democratic Claire McCaskill5,28143.79%
Libertarian Jonathan Dine4293.56%

Marion County is included in Missouri's 6th Congressional District and is represented by Sam Graves (R-Tarkio) in the U.S. House of Representatives.

U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 6th Congressional District - Marion County (2016)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Sam Graves9,40574.46%+0.30
Democratic David M. Blackwell2,91523.08%-0.76
Libertarian Russ Lee Monchil1931.53%-0.47
Green Mike Diel1180.93%+0.93
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri’s 6th Congressional District — Marion County (2014)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Sam Graves5,00874.16%+9.76
Democratic Bill Hedge1,61023.84%-9.88
Libertarian Russ Lee Monchil1352.00%+0.12
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 6th Congressional District — Marion County (2012)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Sam Graves7,46264.40%
Democratic Kyle Yarber3,90733.72%
Libertarian Russ Lee Monchil2181.88%
Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [15]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 74.1%9,91523.9% 3,2021.9% 259
2016 72.8%9,41923.1% 2,9944.1% 525
2012 65.2%7,92333.2% 4,0311.7% 204
2008 61.4%7,70537.5% 4,7031.2% 145
2004 62.8%7,81536.7% 4,5680.6% 70
2000 55.9%6,55042.6% 4,9931.4% 169
1996 43.4% 4,65345.9%4,92410.7% 1,144
1992 40.4% 4,76243.8%5,15615.8% 1,865
1988 47.2% 5,03452.6%5,6170.2% 23
1984 59.4%6,83140.6% 4,666
1980 49.5%6,03648.3% 5,8902.1% 260
1976 47.2% 5,50152.5%6,1240.3% 38
1972 63.3%7,19736.7% 4,171
1968 41.6% 4,73247.6%5,41610.7% 1,221
1964 30.3% 3,60569.8%8,314
1960 48.8% 6,43151.2%6,758
1956 45.1% 5,65754.9%6,874
1952 42.1% 6,16257.8%8,4570.1% 18
1948 29.4% 3,80270.5%9,1220.2% 20
1944 34.7% 4,56065.2%8,5750.1% 14
1940 37.6% 5,89262.1%9,7230.3% 45
1936 29.4% 4,62870.3%11,0680.3% 51
1932 28.4% 4,12370.9%10,2930.7% 103
1928 57.3%7,66442.5% 5,6790.2% 24
1924 44.0% 5,40846.7%5,7399.4% 1,150
1920 40.4% 4,66058.2%6,7191.4% 166
1916 37.3% 2,75961.3%4,5341.5% 108
1912 28.7% 1,69358.7%3,47112.6% 745
1908 37.7% 2,55458.8%3,9823.5% 236
1904 42.2% 2,43354.3%3,1273.5% 202
1900 38.2% 2,49060.2%3,9271.7% 109
1896 39.9% 2,69959.3%4,0080.8% 52
1892 36.5% 2,15461.5%3,6342.0% 119
1888 39.0% 2,29457.2%3,3653.7% 220

Historically a Democratic county in the 20th century, with the exception of Republican landslides in 1972 and 1984, Marion County has been reliably Republican since 2000. The last Democrat to receive 40% or more of the vote was Al Gore that same year.

Missouri presidential preference primary (2008)

Former U.S. Senator Hillary Clinton (D-New York) received more votes, a total of 1,587, than any candidate from either party in Marion County during the 2008 presidential primary.

Communities

Cities and towns

Unincorporated communities

Former communities

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved September 10, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. "Marion County, Missouri". 2013. Retrieved October 23, 2014.
  4. "Marion County Collection Descriptions". The State Historical Society of Missouri. Retrieved November 24, 2014.
  5. "A Short History of Marion County". MOGenWeb. Retrieved November 24, 2014.
  6. Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. pp.  193.
  7. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  8. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  9. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  10. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  11. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  12. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  13. Breeding, Marshall. "Hannibal Free Public Library". Libraries.org. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  14. Breeding, Marshall. "Palmyra Bicentennial Public Library". Libraries.org. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  15. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 25, 2018.

Further reading

Coordinates: 39°49′N91°37′W / 39.81°N 91.62°W / 39.81; -91.62