Hickory County, Missouri

Last updated
Hickory County
Hickory County Missouri Courthouse 20191026-6904.jpg
Hickory County courthouse in Hermitage
Map of Missouri highlighting Hickory County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Missouri
Missouri in United States.svg
Missouri's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 37°56′N93°19′W / 37.94°N 93.32°W / 37.94; -93.32
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Missouri.svg  Missouri
FoundedFebruary 14, 1845
Named for Andrew Jackson, nicknamed "Old Hickory"
Seat Hermitage
Largest cityHermitage
Area
  Total412 sq mi (1,070 km2)
  Land399 sq mi (1,030 km2)
  Water13 sq mi (30 km2)  3.1%
Population
 (2010)
  Total9,627
  Estimate 
(2018)
9,509
  Density23/sq mi (9.0/km2)
Time zone UTC−6 (Central)
  Summer (DST) UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district 4th
Website Hickory County, Missouri

Hickory County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,627. [1] Its county seat is Hermitage. [2] The county was organized February 14, 1845, and named after President Andrew Jackson, whose nickname was "Old Hickory." [3] [4] The Pomme de Terre Dam, a Corps of Engineers facility, is located three miles south of Hermitage and forms Lake Pomme de Terre by damming the Pomme de Terre River and Lindley Creek. The county is also home to Lucas Oil Speedway at Wheatland that includes a major circle dirt racing track, an off-road racing track as well as a large man-made water drag racing facility. Truman Reservoir, also a Corps of Engineers facility, floods the Pomme de Terre Reservoir from the northern border of the county southward to the city limits of Hermitage.

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 412 square miles (1,070 km2), of which 399 square miles (1,030 km2) is land and 13 square miles (34 km2) (3.1%) is water. [5] It is the fifth-smallest county in Missouri by area.

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1850 2,329
1860 4,705102.0%
1870 6,45237.1%
1880 7,38714.5%
1890 9,45328.0%
1900 9,9855.6%
1910 8,741−12.5%
1920 7,033−19.5%
1930 6,430−8.6%
1940 6,5061.2%
1950 5,387−17.2%
1960 4,516−16.2%
1970 4,481−0.8%
1980 6,36742.1%
1990 7,33515.2%
2000 8,94021.9%
2010 9,6277.7%
2018 (est.)9,509 [6] −1.2%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
1790-1960 [8] 1900-1990 [9]
1990-2000 [10] 2010-2015 [1]

As of the census [11] of 2000, there were 8,940 people, 3,911 households, and 2,737 families residing in the county. The population density was 22 people per square mile (9/km2). There were 6,184 housing units at an average density of 16 per square mile (6/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.51% White, 0.08% Black or African American, 0.66% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.20% from other races, and 1.44% from two or more races. Approximately 0.76% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 3,911 households, out of which 22.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.90% were married couples living together, 6.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.00% were non-families. 26.50% of all households were made up of individuals, and 15.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.70.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 19.90% under the age of 18, 5.30% from 18 to 24, 19.10% from 25 to 44, 29.70% from 45 to 64, and 26.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 50 years. For every 100 females there were 96.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $25,346, and the median income for a family was $28,779. Males had a median income of $22,679 versus $17,610 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,536. About 13.00% of families and 19.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 32.90% of those under age 18 and 11.00% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Public schools

Public libraries

Politics

Local

The Republican Party predominantly controls politics at the local level in Hickory County. Republicans hold all but four of the elected positions in the county.

Hickory County, Missouri
Elected countywide officials
Assessor Clint Baker Republican
Circuit Clerk Cee Cee Smith Republican
County Clerk Jeannie Lindsey Republican
Collector Karen Stokes Republican
Commissioner
(Presiding)
Robert Sawyer Republican
Commissioner
(District 1)
Chase Crawford Democratic
Commissioner
(District 2)
Rick Pearson Republican
Coroner Connie Boller Republican
Prosecuting Attorney Michael Brown Republican
Public Administrator Vanessa Prettyman Republican
Recorder Pamela Hutton Republican
Sheriff Brian Whalen Republican
Surveyor T. Philip Nasalroad Democratic
Treasurer Kenny Ratliff Republican

State

Past Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 62.30%2,93634.12% 1,6083.58% 169
2012 46.65% 2,17750.01%2,3343.34% 156
2008 35.62% 1,82060.96%3,1153.42% 175
2004 56.54%2,75042.17% 2,0511.30% 63
2000 47.74% 1,86950.46%2,1321.80% 76
1996 47.36% 1,86949.90%1,9692.74% 108

All of Hickory County is a part of Missouri's 125th District in the Missouri House of Representatives and is represented by Warren D. Love (R-Osceola).

Missouri House of Representatives — District 125 — Hickory County (2016) [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Warren D. Love3,977100.00%
Missouri House of Representatives — District 125 — Hickory County (2014)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Warren D. Love2,006100.00%
Missouri House of Representatives — District 125 — Hickory County (2012)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Warren D. Love3,931100.00%

All of Hickory County is a part of Missouri's 28th District in the Missouri Senate. The seat is held by Sandy Crawford who was elected after the previous incumbent, Mike Parson, was elected Lieutenant Governor in 2016.

Missouri Senate — District 28 — Hickory County (2014)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Mike Parson2,075100.00%

Federal

U.S. Senate — Missouri — Hickory County (2016) [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Roy Blunt2,95962.93%+20.24
Democratic Jason Kander1,49031.69%-17.67
Libertarian Jonathan Dine1352.87%-5.08
Green Johnathan McFarland691.47%+1.47
Constitution Fred Ryman491.04%+1.04
U.S. Senate — Missouri — Hickory County (2012)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Todd Akin1,98242.69%
Democratic Claire McCaskill2,29249.36%
Libertarian Jonathan Dine3697.95%

All of Hickory County is included in Missouri's 4th Congressional District and is currently represented by Vicky Hartzler (R-Harrisonville) in the U.S. House of Representatives.

U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 4th Congressional District — St. Clair County (2016) [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Vicky Hartzler3,43474.44%+1.87
Democratic Gordon Christensen99421.55%-1.76
Libertarian Mark Bliss1854.01%-0.11
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 4th Congressional District — St. Clair County (2014)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Vicky Hartzler1,77872.57%+8.57
Democratic Nate Irvin57123.31%-9.02
Libertarian Herschel L. Young1014.12%+1.20
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri’s 4th Congressional District — St. Clair County (2012)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Vicky Hartzler2,96364.00%
Democratic Teresa Hensley1,49732.33%
Libertarian Thomas Hollbrook1352.92%
Constitution Greg Cowan350.75%

Political culture

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [14]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 78.1%3,96620.8% 1,0561.1% 58
2016 74.4%3,54221.3% 1,0164.3% 203
2012 60.6%2,83537.0% 1,7332.4% 112
2008 55.7%2,85042.4% 2,1711.8% 94
2004 57.4%2,79142.0% 2,0430.7% 32
2000 51.3%2,17246.3% 1,9612.5% 105
1996 38.1% 1,49147.5%1,85814.4% 563
1992 31.0% 1,25947.5%1,92921.4% 870
1988 54.8%2,04345.0% 1,6770.2% 7
1984 64.4%2,19035.6% 1,212
1980 58.9%1,89338.8% 1,2482.2% 72
1976 49.7%1,40349.5% 1,3980.7% 21
1972 74.9%1,85125.2% 622
1968 66.6%1,48424.1% 5379.4% 209
1964 57.5%1,15742.5% 854
1960 75.4%1,88524.6% 615
1956 70.5%1,66129.5% 695
1952 76.5%2,05423.2% 6220.4% 10
1948 70.2%1,72829.8% 7330.0% 1
1944 79.4%2,17120.5% 5600.1% 3
1940 75.8%2,49623.9% 7870.2% 8
1936 71.7%2,32928.0% 9100.3% 8
1932 64.0%1,58635.4% 8780.6% 15
1928 84.7%2,23315.1% 3990.2% 5
1924 70.7%1,89526.9% 7222.4% 63
1920 78.6%2,13119.6% 5321.8% 50
1916 64.7%1,14431.2% 5524.0% 71
1912 45.8%73526.3% 42127.9% 448
1908 65.5%1,18231.1% 5613.4% 61
1904 66.7%1,24528.4% 5314.9% 92
1900 60.1%1,27036.7% 7773.2% 68
1896 53.1%1,19446.5% 1,0450.4% 8
1892 49.8%92722.7% 42327.4% 510
1888 57.6%1,07633.6% 6288.8% 164

Missouri presidential preference primary (2008)

Hickory County, Missouri
2008 Republican primary in Missouri
John McCain 453 (33.19%)
Mike Huckabee 548 (40.15%)
Mitt Romney 238 (20.73%)
Ron Paul 64 (4.69%)
Hickory County, Missouri
2008 Democratic primary in Missouri
Hillary Clinton 1,056 (67.95%)
Barack Obama 433 (27.86%)
John Edwards (withdrawn)52 (3.35%)

Communities

Notable people

See also

Related Research Articles

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Hermitage, Missouri City in Missouri, United States

Hermitage is a city in Hickory County, Missouri, United States, on the Pomme de Terre River. The population was 467 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Hickory County. The John Siddles Williams House on Museum Street in Hermitage, on the National Register of Historic Places since 1980, houses the Hickory County Historical Society Museum and Research Room.

References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved September 9, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. pp.  172.
  4. Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. pp.  156.
  5. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  6. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved November 20, 2019.
  7. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  8. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  9. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  10. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  11. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  12. Breeding, Marshall. "Hickory County Library". Libraries.org. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  13. 1 2 3 "County Results - State of Missouri - 2016 General Election - November 8, 2016 - Official Results". Missouri Secretary of state. December 12, 2016. Retrieved April 28, 2017.
  14. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-25.

Coordinates: 37°56′N93°19′W / 37.94°N 93.32°W / 37.94; -93.32