Benton County, Missouri

Last updated
Benton County
Benton County Missouri Courthouse-20191026-6937.jpg
Benton County courthouse in Warsaw
Map of Missouri highlighting Benton County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Missouri
Missouri in United States.svg
Missouri's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 38°18′N93°17′W / 38.3°N 93.29°W / 38.3; -93.29
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Missouri.svg  Missouri
FoundedJanuary 3, 1835
Named for Thomas Hart Benton
Seat Warsaw
Largest cityWarsaw
Area
  Total753 sq mi (1,950 km2)
  Land704 sq mi (1,820 km2)
  Water48 sq mi (120 km2)  6.4%
Population
 (2010)
  Total19,056
  Estimate 
(2019) [1]
19,443
  Density28/sq mi (11/km2)
Time zone UTC−6 (Central)
  Summer (DST) UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district 4th
Website www.bentoncomo.com

Benton County is a county located in the west central part of the U.S. state of Missouri. The population was 19,056 as of the 2010 Census. [2] Its county seat is Warsaw. [3] The county was organized January 3, 1835, and named for U.S. Senator Thomas Hart Benton of Missouri. [4]

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 753 square miles (1,950 km2), of which 704 square miles (1,820 km2) is land and 48 square miles (120 km2) (6.4%) is water. [5]

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1840 4,205
1850 5,01519.3%
1860 9,07280.9%
1870 11,32224.8%
1880 12,3969.5%
1890 14,97320.8%
1900 16,55610.6%
1910 14,881−10.1%
1920 12,989−12.7%
1930 11,708−9.9%
1940 11,142−4.8%
1950 9,080−18.5%
1960 8,737−3.8%
1970 9,69511.0%
1980 12,18325.7%
1990 13,85913.8%
2000 17,18024.0%
2010 19,05610.9%
2019 (est.)19,4432.0%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1790-1960 [7] 1900-1990 [8]
1990-2000 [9] 2010-2015 [2] 2019 [1]

As of the census [10] of 2000, there were 17,180 people, 7,420 households, and 5,179 families residing in the county. The population density was 24 people per square mile (9/km2). There were 12,691 housing units at an average density of 18 per square mile (7/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.96% White, 0.15% Black or African American, 0.53% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.12% from other races, and 1.10% from two or more races. Approximately 0.89% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 7,420 households, out of which 23.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.60% were married couples living together, 6.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.20% were non-families. 26.30% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.72.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 20.50% under the age of 18, 5.70% from 18 to 24, 21.80% from 25 to 44, 29.70% from 45 to 64, and 22.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46 years. For every 100 females there were 98.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $26,646, and the median income for a family was $32,459. Males had a median income of $26,203 versus $19,054 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,457. About 10.20% of families and 15.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.50% of those under age 18 and 9.60% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Public schools

Private schools

Public libraries

Politics

Local

The Republican Party predominantly controls politics at the local level in Benton County. Republicans hold all but one of the elected positions in the county.

Benton County, Missouri
Elected countywide officials
Assessor Jim Hansen Republican
Circuit Clerk Cheryl Schultz Republican
County Clerk Susan Porterfield Republican
Collector David Brodersen Republican
Commissioner
(Presiding)
Steve Daleske Republican
Commissioner
(District 1)
Vacant Republican
Commissioner
(District 2)
Dale Jr Estes Republican
Coroner J. Weston Miller Republican
Prosecuting Attorney Karen Coffey Woodley Republican
Public Administrator Lori Dunkin Republican
Recorder Carla Brown Republican
Sheriff Eric Knox Republican
Surveyor Jesse Wininger Republican
Treasurer Rick Renno Republican

State

Past Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 63.41%6,04733.55% 3,1993.04% 290
2012 50.94%4,64146.25% 4,2132.81% 256
2008 41.57% 3,96756.09%5,3532.34% 223
2004 56.67%5,08841.95% 3,7671.39% 124
2000 52.76%3,94445.58% 3,4071.66% 124
1996 44.36% 2,97952.42%3,5203.22% 216

Benton County is split between two of Missouri's legislative districts that elect members of the Missouri House of Representatives. Both are represented by Republicans.

Missouri House of Representatives — District 57 — Benton County (2016) [12]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Wanda Brown3,02673.32%-2.99
Democratic William A. Grimes1,10126.68%+7.97
Missouri House of Representatives — District 57 — Benton County (2014)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Wanda Brown1,67276.31%+5.37
Democratic William A. Grimes41018.71%-10.35
Constitution Butch Page1094.98%+4.98
Missouri House of Representatives — District 57 — Benton County (2012)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Wanda Brown2,80370.94%
Democratic Don Bullock1,14829.06%
Missouri House of Representatives — District 125 — Benton County (2016) [12]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Warren D. Love4,539100.00%
Missouri House of Representatives — District 125 — Benton County (2014)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Warren D. Love2,069100.00%
Missouri House of Representatives — District 125 — Benton County (2012)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Warren D. Love4,160100.00%

All of Benton County is a part of Missouri's 28th District in the Missouri Senate. The seat is currently vacant. The previous incumbent, Mike Parson, was elected Lieutenant Governor in 2016.

Missouri Senate — District 28 — Benton County (2014)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Mike Parson3,956100.00%

Federal

U.S. Senate — Missouri — Benton County (2016) [12]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Roy Blunt5,89161.87%+14.66
Democratic Jason Kander3,09732.52%-12.55
Libertarian Jonathan Dine3003.15%-4.57
Green Johnathan McFarland1031.08%+1.08
Constitution Fred Ryman1311.38%+1.38
U.S. Senate — Missouri — Benton County (2012)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Todd Akin4,27747.21%
Democratic Claire McCaskill4,08345.07%
Libertarian Jonathan Dine6997.72%

All of Benton County is included in Missouri's 4th Congressional District and is currently represented by Vicky Hartzler (R-Harrisonville) in the U.S. House of Representatives.

U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri’s 4th Congressional District — Benton County (2016) [12]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Vicky Hartzler6,92873.73%-0.58
Democratic Gordon Christensen2,05621.88%+0.92
Libertarian Mark Bliss4134.39%-0.34
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 4th Congressional District — Benton County (2014)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Vicky Hartzler3,56674.31%+7.21
Democratic Nate Irvin1,00620.96%-8.89
Libertarian Herschel L. Young2274.73%+2.14
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 4th Congressional District — Benton County (2012)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Vicky Hartzler6,04467.10%
Democratic Teresa Hensley2,68929.85%
Libertarian Thomas Holbrook2332.59%
Constitution Greg Cowan410.46%


Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [13]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 75.2%7,21321.1% 2,0253.7% 352
2012 66.3%6,06931.9% 2,9251.8% 163
2008 59.9%5,75937.8% 3,6292.3% 223
2004 61.9%5,57537.5% 3,3810.6% 53
2000 56.0%4,21841.8% 3,1502.2% 166
1996 43.1% 2,89544.6%2,99612.3% 824
1992 34.5% 2,51143.9%3,19521.6% 1,570
1988 56.4%3,46743.2% 2,6540.4% 24
1984 62.8%3,80537.2% 2,251
1980 59.0%3,45138.3% 2,2412.7% 160
1976 51.5%2,87548.0% 2,6840.5% 28
1972 71.3%3,53728.7% 1,423
1968 61.1%2,89928.4% 1,34510.5% 498
1964 55.0%2,47745.0% 2,030
1960 70.0%3,48430.0% 1,496
1956 66.8%3,14533.2% 1,563
1952 72.3%3,47027.2% 1,3030.5% 26
1948 67.0%2,76832.9% 1,3600.1% 3
1944 74.7%3,29425.1% 1,1080.1% 6
1940 68.7%3,91231.0% 1,7650.3% 18
1936 63.1%3,37536.5% 1,9500.4% 21
1932 43.6% 2,03855.6%2,5960.8% 38
1928 72.3%3,41127.5% 1,2960.2% 9
1924 60.7%2,69335.8% 1,5883.5% 155
1920 68.5%3,36730.6% 1,5060.9% 42
1916 57.9%1,84240.4% 1,2851.8% 56
1912 37.4% 1,14239.6%1,20923.1% 704
1908 59.1%1,92439.3% 1,2801.6% 52
1904 57.0%1,96339.8% 1,3723.2% 109
1900 54.4%1,98042.1% 1,5323.5% 128
1896 51.8%1,95746.6% 1,7621.7% 63
1892 51.0%1,57034.4% 1,05814.6% 450
1888 54.3%1,70443.8% 1,3742.0% 62

Communities

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. 1 2 "QuickFacts. Benton County, Missouri" . Retrieved October 2, 2020.
  2. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 7, 2011. Retrieved September 7, 2013.
  3. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  4. Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. pp.  209.
  5. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  6. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  7. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  8. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  9. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  10. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  11. Breeding, Marshall. "Boonslick Regional Library". Libraries.org. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  12. 1 2 3 4 "County Results - State of Missouri - 2016 General Election - November 8, 2016 - Official Results". Missouri Secretary of State. December 12, 2016. Retrieved April 28, 2017.
  13. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-24.

Further reading

Coordinates: 38°18′N93°17′W / 38.30°N 93.29°W / 38.30; -93.29