Ozark County, Missouri

Last updated
Ozark County
Ozark County MO Courthouse 20151021-028.jpg
Ozark County Courthouse in Gainesville
Map of Missouri highlighting Ozark County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Missouri
Missouri in United States.svg
Missouri's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°39′N92°26′W / 36.65°N 92.44°W / 36.65; -92.44
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Missouri.svg  Missouri
FoundedJanuary 29, 1841
Named for Ozark Mountains
Seat Gainesville
Largest cityGainesville
Area
  Total755 sq mi (1,960 km2)
  Land745 sq mi (1,930 km2)
  Water10 sq mi (30 km2)  1.4%
Population
 (2010)
  Total9,723
  Estimate 
(2018)
9,017
  Density13/sq mi (5.0/km2)
Time zone UTC−6 (Central)
  Summer (DST) UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district 8th
Website www.mogenweb.org/ozark/

Ozark County is a county located in the southern portion of the U.S. state of Missouri. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,723. [1] The largest city and county seat is Gainesville. [2] The county was organized as Ozark County, named after the Ozark Mountains, on January 29, 1841. It was renamed Decatur County, after Commodore Stephen Decatur, from 1843 to 1845, after which the name Ozark County was restored. [3]

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 755 square miles (1,960 km2), of which 745 square miles (1,930 km2) is land and 10 square miles (26 km2) (1.4%) is water. [4] Arkansas is located to the south of Ozark County.

Adjacent counties

Major highways

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1850 2,294
1860 2,4476.7%
1870 3,36337.4%
1880 5,61867.1%
1890 9,79574.4%
1900 12,14524.0%
1910 11,926−1.8%
1920 11,125−6.7%
1930 9,537−14.3%
1940 10,76612.9%
1950 8,856−17.7%
1960 6,744−23.8%
1970 6,226−7.7%
1980 7,96127.9%
1990 8,5988.0%
2000 9,54211.0%
2010 9,7231.9%
2018 (est.)9,017 [5] −7.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1790-1960 [7] 1900-1990 [8]
1990-2000 [9] 2010-2015 [1]

As of the census [10] of 2000, there were 9,542 people, 3,950 households, and 2,855 families residing in the county. The population density was 13 people per square mile (5/km2). There were 5,114 housing units at an average density of 7 per square mile (3/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.57% White, 0.15% Black or African American, 0.65% Native American, 0.08% Asian, 0.19% from other races, and 1.36% from two or more races. Approximately 0.94% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Among the major first ancestries reported in Ozark County were 28.6% American, 15.9% German, 12.1% English, and 11.4% Irish.

There were 3,950 households, out of which 26.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.20% were married couples living together, 6.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.70% were non-families. 24.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.81.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 22.10% under the age of 18, 6.90% from 18 to 24, 22.80% from 25 to 44, 28.70% from 45 to 64, and 19.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 98.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,508, and the median income for a family was $36,622. Males had a median income of $21,685 versus $17,312 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,302. About 16.10% of families and 21.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 30.80% of those under age 18 and 17.20% of those age 65 or over.

Religion

According to the Association of Religion Data Archives County Membership Report (2000), Ozark County is a part of the Bible Belt with evangelical Protestantism being the majority religion. The most predominant denominations among residents in Ozark County who adhere to a religion are Southern Baptists (25.79%), Churches of Christ (24.83%), and Pentecostals (17.07%).

Education

Of adults 25 years of age and older in Ozark County, 73.0% possesses a high school diploma or higher while 8.3% holds a bachelor's degree or higher as their highest educational attainment.

Public schools

Public libraries

Gainesville Library

Politics

Local

The Republican Party predominantly controls politics at the local level in Ozark County. Republicans hold all but one of the elected positions in the county.

Ozark County, Missouri
Elected countywide officials
Assessor Jama Berry Republican
Circuit Clerk Becki Strong Republican
County Clerk Brian Wise Republican
Collector Darla Sullivan Republican
Commissioner
(Presiding)
Johnnie Turner Republican
Commissioner
(District 1)
Gary Collins Republican
Commissioner
(District 2)
Greg Donley Independent
Coroner Shane Ledbetter Republican
Prosecuting Attorney John Garrabrant Republican
Public Administrator Melinda Abraham Republican
Recorder Becki Strong Republican
Sheriff Darren Reed Republican
Surveyor Matt Wade Republican
Treasurer Christy Thompson Republican

State

All of Ozark County is a part of Missouri's 155th District in the Missouri House of Representatives and is represented by Lyle Rowland (R-Cedar Creek).

Missouri House of Representatives — District 155 — Ozark County (2016)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Lyle Rowland3,799100.00%
Missouri House of Representatives — District 155 — Ozark County (2014)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Lyle Rowland2,257100.00%
Missouri House of Representatives — District 155 — Ozark County (2012)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Lyle Rowland3,591100.00%

All of Ozark County is a part of Missouri's 33rd District in the Missouri Senate and is currently represented by Mike Cunningham (R-Rogersville).

Missouri Senate — District 33 — Ozark County (2016)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Mike Cunningham3,787100.00%
Missouri Senate — District 33 — Ozark County (2012)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Mike Cunningham3,608100.00%

Federal

U.S. Senate — Missouri — Ozark County (2016)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Roy Blunt3,08569.02%+19.04
Democratic Jason Kander1,11324.90%-17.45
Libertarian Jonathan Dine1262.82%-4.85
Green Johnathan McFarland701.56%+1.56
Constitution Fred Ryman761.70%+1.70
U.S. Senate — Missouri — Ozark County (2012)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Todd Akin2,20249.98%
Democratic Claire McCaskill1,86642.35%
Libertarian Jonathan Dine3387.67%

Ozark County is included in Missouri's 8th Congressional District and is currently represented by Jason T. Smith (R-Salem) in the U.S. House of Representatives. Smith won a special election on Tuesday, June 4, 2013, to finish out the remaining term of U.S. Representative Jo Ann Emerson (R-Cape Girardeau). Emerson announced her resignation a month after being reelected with over 70 percent of the vote in the district. She resigned to become CEO of the National Rural Electric Cooperative.

U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 8th Congressional District — Ozark County (2016)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Jason T. Smith3,47880.11%+9.61
Democratic Dave Cowell72316.61%-0.85
Libertarian Jonathan Shell1433.28%+1.09
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 8th Congressional District — Ozark County (2014)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Jason T. Smith1,83370.50%-1.54
Democratic Barbara Stocker45417.46%-2.04
Libertarian Rick Vandeven572.19%-0.97
Constitution Doug Enyart331.27%-4.03
Independent Terry Hampton2238.58%+8.58
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 8th Congressional District — Special Election — Ozark County (2013)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Jason T. Smith63972.04%-3.05
Democratic Steve Hodges17319.50%-1.36
Libertarian Bill Slantz283.16%-0.89
Constitution Doug Enyart475.30%+5.30
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 8th Congressional District — Ozark County (2012)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Jo Ann Emerson3,264%75.09%
Democratic Jack Rushin90720.86%
Libertarian Rick Vandeven1764.05%
Past Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 68.66%3,07827.39% 1,2283.95% 177
2012 52.63%2,33443.92% 1,9483.45% 153
2008 42.47% 1,96753.63%2,4843.90% 181
2004 63.04%2,94934.80% 1,6282.16% 101
2000 58.65%2,50238.54% 1,6442.81% 120
1996 59.15%2,37638.16% 1,5332.69% 108
1992 53.21%2,22246.79% 1,9540.00% 0
1988 74.47%2,72125.18% 9200.36% 13
1984 74.92%2,74225.08% 9180.00% 0
1980 61.61%2,28738.20% 1,4180.19% 7
1976 61.76%1,88638.21% 1,1670.03% 1

Political culture

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [11]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 83.6%4,06415.5% 7521.0% 48
2016 80.8%3,63916.1% 7243.2% 142
2012 69.2%3,08028.3% 1,2612.5% 112
2008 62.3%2,91835.5% 1,6612.3% 107
2004 65.5%3,08333.2% 1,5611.3% 63
2000 62.1%2,66333.4% 1,4324.6% 197
1996 47.2%1,88236.2% 1,44516.6% 662
1992 41.5%1,77237.0% 1,58121.5% 918
1988 64.2%2,40435.5% 1,3290.3% 11
1984 70.2%2,61429.8% 1,110
1980 64.6%2,43432.9% 1,2422.5% 94
1976 56.5%1,75443.2% 1,3410.3% 10
1972 77.2%2,11922.8% 625
1968 68.4%1,96721.1% 60610.6% 304
1964 59.1%1,54040.9% 1,064
1960 78.3%2,59521.7% 721
1956 70.7%2,14129.3% 887
1952 77.7%2,57222.2% 7340.1% 3
1948 69.5%1,96730.3% 8590.2% 6
1944 81.1%2,70718.8% 6280.1% 3
1940 77.7%3,42121.9% 9650.4% 19
1936 68.5%2,98131.2% 1,3590.3% 14
1932 55.7%1,73043.7% 1,3580.6% 18
1928 82.7%2,61616.7% 5290.6% 19
1924 69.1%1,75827.0% 6883.9% 100
1920 79.7%2,45718.5% 5691.8% 56
1916 65.9%1,33132.4% 6541.7% 35
1912 32.7% 69527.1% 57540.3%856
1908 65.8%1,23331.7% 5942.6% 48
1904 68.0%1,30529.0% 5563.0% 58
1900 63.3%1,27234.6% 6952.1% 43
1896 53.5%1,18746.2% 1,0250.4% 8
1892 57.2%88125.2% 38717.6% 271
1888 59.1%88429.0% 43411.8% 177

Like most counties situated in Southwest Missouri, Ozark County is a Republican stronghold in presidential elections. George W. Bush carried Ozark County in 2000 and 2004 by convincing two-to-one margins. Like many other rural counties throughout Missouri, Ozark County favored John McCain over Barack Obama in 2008. No Democratic presidential nominee has won Ozark County in over 150 years. [12]

Like most rural areas throughout the Bible Belt in Southwest Missouri, voters in Ozark County traditionally adhere to socially and culturally conservative principles which tend to influence their Republican leanings. In 2004, Missourians voted on a constitutional amendment to define marriage as the union between a man and a woman—it overwhelmingly passed Ozark County with 82.18 percent of the vote. The initiative passed the state with 71 percent of support from voters as Missouri became the first state to ban same-sex marriage. In 2006, Missourians voted on a constitutional amendment to fund and legalize embryonic stem cell research in the state—it narrowly failed in Ozark County with 51.07 percent voting against the measure. The initiative narrowly passed the state with 51 percent of support from voters as Missouri became one of the first states in the nation to approve embryonic stem cell research. Despite Ozark County's longstanding tradition of supporting socially conservative platforms, voters in the county have a penchant for advancing populist causes like increasing the minimum wage. In 2006, Missourians voted on a proposition (Proposition B) to increase the minimum wage in the state to $6.50 an hour—it passed Ozark County with 76.94 percent of the vote. The proposition strongly passed every single county in Missouri with 78.99 percent voting in favor as the minimum wage was increased to $6.50 an hour in the state. During the same election, voters in five other states also strongly approved increases in the minimum wage.

Missouri presidential preference primary (2008)

Ozark County, Missouri
2008 Republican primary in Missouri
John McCain 428 (26.87%)
Mike Huckabee 766 (48.09%)
Mitt Romney 235 (14.75%)
Ron Paul 149 (9.35%)
Ozark County, Missouri
2008 Democratic primary in Missouri
Hillary Clinton 689 (65.62%)
Barack Obama 332 (31.62%)
John Edwards (withdrawn)18 (1.71%)

In the 2008 presidential primary, voters in Ozark County from both political parties supported candidates who finished in second place in the state at large and nationally.

Communities

City

Villages

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved September 12, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. "Disappearing Missouri Names". The Kansas City Star. March 19, 1911. p. 15. Retrieved August 15, 2014 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  4. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved November 17, 2014.
  5. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved November 13, 2019.
  6. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 17, 2014.
  7. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 17, 2014.
  8. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 17, 2014.
  9. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 17, 2014.
  10. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  11. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-26.
  12. Brandt, Maxwell; ‘A Few Lists of 2008 Election Results’

Coordinates: 36°39′N92°26′W / 36.65°N 92.44°W / 36.65; -92.44