San Francisco 4th and King Street station

Last updated
San Francisco
4th and King station from I-280 ramp (3), December 2019.JPG
4th and King Street station seen from an I-280 off-ramp in 2019
Location700 Fourth Street at King Street
San Francisco, California
Coordinates 37°46′35″N122°23′40″W / 37.77639°N 122.39444°W / 37.77639; -122.39444 Coordinates: 37°46′35″N122°23′40″W / 37.77639°N 122.39444°W / 37.77639; -122.39444
Owned by Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board
Line(s)Peninsula Subdivision (Caltrain [1]
Platforms6 island platforms (Caltrain)
2 island platforms,
2 side platforms (Muni) [2]
Tracks13 (Caltrain)
4 (Muni) [2]
ConnectionsAiga bus trans.svg Flixbus
Aiga bus trans.svg Muni: 10, 30, 45, 47, 81X, 82X, 83X, KT Bus, N Owl, N Bus
Construction
ParkingNone
Bicycle facilities180 lockers
22 racks
Disabled accessYes
Other information
Fare zoneFare Zone 1 (Caltrain)
History
Opened1975 (Caltrain)
1998 (Muni)
Passengers
201815,427 (Caltrain mid-weekday average) [3] Decrease2.svg 1.5%(Caltrain)
Services
Preceding station Caltrain roundel.svg Caltrain Following station
Terminus Local (L1) 22nd Street
Weekend Local (L2)
Limited (L3) Millbrae
Limited (L4) 22nd Street
Limited (L5) 22nd Street
Baby Bullet (B7) Millbrae
22nd Street
(reverse peak)
Preceding station BSicon LOGO SFmuni.svg Muni Following station
2nd and King
towards Ocean Beach
N Judah Terminus
2nd and King
towards Balboa Park
T Third Street Mission Rock
towards Sunnydale
4th and Brannan
Opening 2022
towards Chinatown
2nd and King E Embarcadero
Suspended
Terminus
Proposed service
Preceding station California High Speed Rail.svg California High-Speed Rail Following station
Terminus Phase I
(2031 Service)
Millbrae
towards Bakersfield
San Francisco
Terminus
Phase I
Full-Build Service
Millbrae
towards Anaheim or Merced
Location
San Francisco 4th and King Street station

San Francisco 4th and King Street, 4th and King [2] (previously 4th & Townsend), or Caltrain Depot is the north end of the Caltrain commuter rail line to the San Francisco Peninsula and Santa Clara Valley, and is a major area transit hub. It is next to a Muni Metro light rail station, which provides connections to downtown San Francisco and Bay Area Rapid Transit.

Contents

History

Southern Pacific's 3rd and Townsend terminal was replaced in 1975 by the current station. Southern Pacific Terminus, 3rd and Townsend, San Francisco.jpg
Southern Pacific's 3rd and Townsend terminal was replaced in 1975 by the current station.

The station is in the Mission Bay/China Basin area, bordered on the north by Townsend Street, east by 4th Street, and south by King Street. All 13 tracks approaching from the west presently terminate here, just short of 4th Street. The facility opened on June 21, 1975, replacing a station built in 1914 at 3rd and Townsend, one block away to the east.

4th & King is one block from Oracle Park, the home of the San Francisco Giants. Caltrain runs extra trains on game days to shuttle fans to and from the ballpark.

The Muni light-rail extension to the station was opened in 1998. [4]

Future

The Downtown Rail Extension project to the rebuilt Transbay Terminal includes the construction of an underground 4th and King station. The underground portion will be adjacent to the current station on the Townsend Street side, [5] but Caltrain will continue using the surface platforms. [6] Until that time, California High-Speed Rail trains are planned to utilize the existing station with modifications for that service. [6] [7] [8]

Following the opening of the Downtown Rail Extension project, California High-Speed Rail service will be extended to the new Transbay Terminal, though most trains are intended to stop at the underground 4th and Townsend as an additional, secondary stop for San Francisco. [9]

Muni service

N Judah trains at 4th and King N Judah trains at 4th and King, April 2018.JPG
N Judah trains at 4th and King

4th and King hosts a number of Muni bus lines, the E Embarcadero historic streetcar line, and Muni's T Third Street and N Judah lines run to Market St downtown. The N Judah station platform is located on the median of King Street immediately southwest of the 4th and King intersection, while The T Third Street station platform is located on the median of 4th Street immediately southeast of the intersection. [2]

N Judah service replaced the J Church on June 30, 2007, two months after the J Church replaced the N Judah on April 7, 2007, on the Caltrain connection to downtown following the opening of the T line. The nearest BART access is the Powell Street station, a 1-mile (1.6 km) walk up 4th street then left on Market St.

Service to Chinatown via Muni's Central Subway will connect to this station in 2022 after a realignment of the T Third Street line's route. [10]

Related Research Articles

San Francisco Municipal Railway Public transport company in San Francisco, California, USA

The San Francisco Municipal Railway (SF Muni or Muni) is the public transit system for the City and County of San Francisco. Despite the name, the network has 54 bus lines and 17 trolleybus lines, in addition to seven light rail lines that operate above ground and in the city's lone subway tube, three historic cable car lines, and two historic streetcar lines.

Caltrain California commuter rail line

Caltrain is a California commuter rail line serving the San Francisco Peninsula and Santa Clara Valley. The southern terminus is in San Jose at Tamien station with weekday rush hour service running as far as Gilroy. The northern terminus of the line is in San Francisco at 4th and King Streets. Caltrain has 28 regular stops, one limited-service weekday-only stop, one weekend-only stop (Broadway), and one football-only stop (Stanford). Weekday ridership in February 2018 averaged 65,095.

Muni Metro Light rail system in San Francisco, California

Muni Metro is a hybrid light rail/streetcar system serving San Francisco, California, United States, operated by the San Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni), a division of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA). With a pre-COVID average weekday ridership of 157,700 passengers, Muni Metro is the United States' second-busiest light rail system. Muni Metro operates a fleet of 151 Breda high-floor light rail vehicles (LRVs), which are currently being replaced by a fleet of 249 Siemens S200 LRVs.

N Judah San Francisco light rail line

The N Judah is a hybrid light rail/streetcar line of the Muni Metro system in San Francisco, California. The line is named after Judah Street that it runs along for much of its length, named after railroad engineer Theodore Judah. It links downtown San Francisco to the Cole Valley and Sunset neighborhoods. It is the busiest line in the Muni Metro system, serving an average of 41,439 weekday passengers in 2013. It was one of San Francisco's streetcar lines, beginning operation in 1928, and was partially converted to modern light-rail operation with the opening of the Muni Metro system in 1980. While many streetcar lines were converted to bus lines after World War II, the N Judah remained a streetcar line due to its use of the Sunset Tunnel.

S Shuttle San Francisco light rail line

The S Shuttle is a light rail service on the Muni Metro system in San Francisco, California. The service began in 2001 as the S Castro Shuttle, an effort to reduce crowding at Castro station. It was briefly discontinued in 2007 when the T Third Street line was opened. Service was extended to St. Francis Circle station in 2013, but cut back to West Portal station in 2016. In 2020, it was changed to full-time service as part of a reconfiguration of Muni Metro service.

Embarcadero station Combined rapid transit and light rail station in San Francisco

Embarcadero station is a combined BART and Muni Metro rapid transit station in the Market Street subway. Located under Market Street between Drumm Street and Beale Street near The Embarcadero, it serves the Financial District neighborhood and surrounding areas. The three-level station has a large fare mezzanine level, with separate platform levels for Muni Metro and BART below. Embarcadero opened in May 1976 – almost two years after service began through the Transbay Tube – as an infill station.

Third Street Light Rail Project San Francisco Muni tram line

The Third Street Light Rail Project was the construction project that expanded the Muni Metro system in San Francisco, California, linking downtown San Francisco to the historically underserved southeastern neighborhoods of Bayview-Hunters Point and Visitacion Valley along the eastern side of the city. Construction was finished in late 2006, non-revenue weekend service began on January 13, 2007, and full service began on April 7, 2007. The new service, as the T Third Street Metro line, replaced the 15 Third bus line, which ran south from the Caltrain Depot at 4th and King streets, along Third Street and Bayshore Boulevard to the southeastern neighborhoods.

Market Street subway BART-Muni Metro main line, San Francisco

The Market Street subway is a double-decker subway tunnel that carries Muni Metro and BART train traffic in San Francisco, California. It runs under the length of Market Street between Embarcadero Station and Castro Street Station. The upper level is used by Muni Metro lines and the lower level is used by BART lines. BART does not run through the whole subway; it turns south and runs under Mission Street southwest of Civic Center Station. The northeastern end of the BART level is connected to the Transbay Tube. On the Muni Metro level, the southwestern end of the Market Street subway connects to the much-older Twin Peaks Tunnel, and the northeastern end connects to surface tracks along the Embarcadero.

San Francisco Transbay Terminal former transit terminal in San Francisco, CA, USA

The San Francisco Transbay Terminal was a transportation complex in San Francisco, California, United States, roughly in the center of the rectangle bounded north–south by Mission Street and Howard Street, and east–west by Beale Street and 2nd Street in the South of Market area of the city. It opened on January 14, 1939 as a train station and was converted into a bus depot in 1959. The terminal mainly served San Francisco's downtown and Financial District, as transportation from surrounding communities of the Bay Area terminated there such as: Golden Gate Transit buses from Marin County, AC Transit buses from the East Bay, and SamTrans buses from San Mateo County. Long-distance buses from beyond the Bay Area such as Greyhound and Amtrak also served the terminal. Several bus lines of the San Francisco Municipal Railway connected with the terminal.

T Third Street San Francisco light rail line

The T Third Street is a Muni Metro line in San Francisco, California. It is the first new light rail line in San Francisco in more than half a century, and the first fully accessible line in the system. It is also the first true light rail line in the mostly streetcar Muni Metro system, as it operates mostly in a street median, rather than in mixed traffic.

E Embarcadero San Francisco heritage streetcar line

The E Embarcadero is a historic streetcar line that is the San Francisco Municipal Railway's second heritage streetcar line in San Francisco, California. Trial service first ran during the Sunday Streets events on The Embarcadero in 2008. The line initially ran on weekends only, but expanded to weeklong service in late April 2016.

San Francisco Transbay development

The San Francisco Transit Center District Plan is a massive redevelopment plan for the neighborhood surrounding the Salesforce Transit Center site, South of Market near the Financial District in San Francisco, California. The new Salesforce Transit Center has replaced the since-demolished San Francisco Transbay Terminal, and new skyscrapers, such as Salesforce Tower, take advantage of the height increases allowed through the Transit Center District Plan. The sale of several land parcels formerly owned by the state and given to the managing Transbay Joint Powers Authority helped finance the construction of the Transit Center.

The Embarcadero and Folsom station

The Embarcadero and Folsom station is a Muni Metro light rail station located in the median of The Embarcadero between Folsom Street and Harrison Street in the Rincon Hill area of San Francisco, California. Muni Metro trains use a high-level island platform, while historic streetcars use a pair of side platforms at the southeast end of the station next to the Harrison Street grade crossing.

The Embarcadero and Brannan station

The Embarcadero and Brannan station is a Muni Metro light rail station located in the median of The Embarcadero south of Brannan Street in the South Beach area of San Francisco, California. Muni Metro trains use a high-level island platform, while historic streetcars use a pair of side platforms at the south end of the station.

2nd and King station Light rail station in San Francisco, California

2nd and King station is a Muni Metro light rail station located in the median of King Street near Second Street in the China Basin neighborhood of San Francisco, California. It is adjacent to Oracle Park. Muni Metro trains use a high-level island platform, while historic streetcars use a pair of side platforms just to the south.

Transbay Transit Center Transit station in San Francisco, US

Salesforce Transit Center is a transit station in downtown San Francisco. It serves as the primary bus terminal — and potentially as a future rail terminal — for the San Francisco Bay Area. The centerpiece of the San Francisco Transbay development, the construction is governed by the Transbay Joint Powers Authority (TJPA). The 1,430-foot (440 m)-long building is located one block south of Market Street, a primary commercial and transportation artery in San Francisco.

The Downtown Rail Extension (DTX) is a planned second phase of the San Francisco Transbay Transit Center (TTC). When complete, it will extend the Caltrain Peninsula Corridor commuter rail line from its current northern terminus at 4th and King via a 1.3 mi (2.1 km) tunnel. The new terminus will be near the Financial District and will provide intermodal connections to BART, Muni, Transbay AC Transit buses, and long-distance buses. In addition, the California High Speed Rail Authority (CHSRA) plans to use DTX and the Caltrain-owned Peninsula Corridor for service on the CHSRA San Francisco–San Jose segment. Because DTX uses a long tunnel, current diesel locomotives are not suitable and the Caltrain Modernization Project (CalMod), which includes electrification of the line and acquisition of electrified rolling stock, is a prerequisite.

References

  1. SMA Rail Consulting (April 2016). "California Passenger Rail Network Schematics" (PDF). California Department of Transportation. p. 13.
  2. 1 2 3 4 San Francisco Municipal Railway Route Map (Map). San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. December 5, 2009. Archived from the original on February 23, 2013. Retrieved January 14, 2010.
  3. "2018 Annual Count Key Findings Report" (PDF). Caltrain. 2018.
  4. Epstein, Edward (26 August 1998). "Brown Tries To Soothe Muni Riders / Service on N-Judah line has been abysmal all week". Hearst Communications. SFGate. Retrieved 27 October 2015.
  5. Caltrain 2025 North Terminal Plan
  6. 1 2 "San Francisco to San Jose Project Section Draft Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement Volume 1 Chapter 2" (PDF). CHSRA. July 2020. pp. 2–5. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  7. "Caltrain/California HSR Blended Operations Analysis" (PDF). Caltrain.com. LTK Engineering Services. Retrieved 13 November 2016.
  8. Thadani, Trisha (10 July 2020). "Plan for high-speed rail rolls out for San Francisco to San Jose - but with little cash". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 12 July 2020.
  9. "2020 Business Plan Service Planning Methodology" (PDF). Retrieved March 14, 2021.
  10. "Project Overview [Central Subway]". San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA).

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