Administrative divisions of Greece

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Administrative divisions of Greece
Διοικητική διαίρεση της Ελλάδας  (Greek)
Kallikratis dioikisi.png
Category Unitary state
Location Hellenic Republic
Number13 regions, 325 municipalities, 1 autonomous entity
PopulationsTotal: 10,815,197
AreasTotal: 131,957 km2 (50,949 sq mi)
Coat of arms of Greece.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Greece

Following the implementation on 1 January 2011 of the Kallikratis Plan, the administrative divisions of Greece consist of two main levels: the regions and the municipalities. In addition, a number of decentralized administrations overseeing the regions exist as part of the Ministry of the Interior, but are not entities of local government. The old prefectures were either abolished and split up or transformed into regional units in 2011. The administrative regions are divided into regional units which are further subdivided into municipalities. The Eastern Orthodox monastic community on Mount Athos is an autonomous self-governing entity.

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Administrative divisions

Municipalities

The first level of government is constituted by the municipalities (δήμοι, dímoi; sing. δήμος, dímos ), which have resulted from merging several former municipalities and communities (themselves the subject of a previous reform with the 1997 Kapodistrias plan). They are run by a mayor (δήμαρχος, dímarchos ) and a municipal council (δημοτικό συμβούλιο, dimotikó symvoúlio), elected every 5 years. The municipalities are further subdivided into municipal units (δημοτικές ενότητες, dimotikés enótites) and finally into communities (κοινότητες, koinótites). Although communities have their own councils, their role is purely advisory to the municipal-level government.

Regions

The second level is composed of the regions (περιφέρειες, periféreies; sing. περιφέρεια, periféreia), run by a regional governor (περιφερειάρχης, perifereiárchis) and a regional council (περιφερειακό συμβούλιο, perifereiakó symvoúlio), popularly elected every 5 years.

The regions are divided into 74 regional units (περιφερειακές ενότητες, perifereiakés enótites), usually but not always coterminous with the former prefectures. Each regional unit is headed by a vice-regional governor (αντιπεριφερειάρχης, antiperifereiárchis), drawn from the same political block as the regional governor.

Decentralized administrations

The third level is composed of the new decentralized administrations (αποκεντρωμένες διοικήσεις, apokentroménes dioikíseis), comprising one to three regions, run by a government-appointed general secretary, assisted by an advisory council drawn from the regional governors and the representatives of the municipalities.

Kallikratis administrative divisions as of 2010 Kallikratis dioikisi.png
Kallikratis administrative divisions as of 2010

     Decentralized Administration of Attica, with the capital of Athens
         Decentralized Administration of Macedonia and Thrace, with the capital of Thessaloniki
         Decentralized Administration of Epirus and Western Macedonia, with the capital of Ioannina
         Decentralized Administration of Thessaly and Central Greece, with the capital of Larissa
             Decentralized Administration of Peloponnese, Western Greece and the Ionian, with the capital of Patras
         Decentralized Administration of the Aegean, with the capital of Piraeus
     Decentralized Administration of Crete, with the capital of Heraklion

     Mount Athos (self-governing, excluded from the Kallikratis Plan)

History

From 1 January 2011, in accordance with the Kallikratis programme, the administrative system of Greece was drastically overhauled. The former system of 13 regions, 54 prefectures and 1033 municipalities and communities was replaced by 7 decentralized administrations, 13 regions and 325 municipalities.

The first elections to the restructured Greek local government areas were held between 7 November and 14 November 2010.

See also

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A local government is a form of public administration which, in a majority of contexts, exists as the lowest tier of administration within a given state. The term is used to contrast with offices at state level, which are referred to as the central government, national government, or federal government and also to supranational government which deals with governing institutions between states. Local governments generally act within powers delegated to them by legislation or directives of the higher level of government. In federal states, local government generally comprises the third tier of government, whereas in unitary states, local government usually occupies the second or third tier of government, often with greater powers than higher-level administrative divisions.

A prefecture is an administrative jurisdiction or subdivision in any of various countries and within some international church structures, and in antiquity a Roman district governed by an appointed prefect.

Administrative regions of Greece First administrative subdivisions of Greece

The administrative regions of Greece are the country's thirteen first-level administrative entities, each comprising several second-level units, originally prefectures and, since 2011, regional units.

During the first administrative division of independent Greece in 1833–1836 and again from 1845 until their abolition with the Kallikratis reform in 2010, the prefectures were the country's main administrative unit. They are now defunct, and have been approximately replaced by regional units.

Central Macedonia administrative region of Greece

Central Macedonia is one of the thirteen administrative regions of Greece, consisting of the central part of the geographical and historical region of Macedonia. With a population of almost 1.9 million, it is the second most populous in Greece after Attica.

Eastern Macedonia and Thrace administrative region of Greece

Eastern Macedonia and Thrace is one of the thirteen administrative regions of Greece. It consists of the northeastern parts of the country, comprising the eastern part of the region of Greek Macedonia along with the region of Western Thrace, and the islands of Thasos and Samothrace.

Western Greece administrative region of Greece

Western Greece Region is one of the thirteen regions of Greece. It comprises the western part of continental Greece and the northwestern part of the Peloponnese peninsula. The capital of the Western Greece is Patras, the third-largest-city in the country with a population of about 280,000 inhabitants

Western Macedonia administrative region of Greece

Western Macedonia is one of the thirteen regions of Greece, consisting of the western part of Greek Macedonia. Located in north-western Greece, it is divided into the regional units of Florina, Grevena, Kastoria, and Kozani. With a population of approximately 280,000 people, as of 2017, the region had one of the highest unemployment rates in the European Union.

The municipalities of Greece are the lowest level of government within the organizational structure of that country. Since the 2011 Kallikratis reform, there are 325 municipalities. Thirteen administrative regions form the largest unit of government beneath the State. Within these regions are 74 second-level areas called regional units. Regional units are then divided into municipalities. The new municipalities can be subdivided into municipal units, which are subdivided into municipal communities or local communities.

Geographic regions of Greece

The traditional geographic regions of Greece are the country's main historical-geographic regions, and were also official administrative regional subdivisions of Greece until the 1987 administrative reform. Despite their replacement as first-level administrative units by the newly defined administrative regions, the nine traditional geographic divisions—six on the mainland and three island groups—are still widely referred to in unofficial contexts and in daily discourse.

Central Greece (region) administrative region of Greece

Central Greece is one of the thirteen administrative regions of Greece. The region occupies the eastern half of the traditional region of Central Greece, including the island of Euboea. To the south it borders the regions of Attica and the Peloponnese, to the west the region of West Greece and to the north the regions of Thessaly and Epirus. Its capital city is Lamia.

Attica (region) administrative region of Greece

Attica Region is an administrative region of Greece, that encompasses the entire metropolitan area of Athens, the country's capital and largest city. The region is coextensive with the former Attica Prefecture of Central Greece, but covers a greater area than the historical region of Attica.

Regional units of Greece administrative territorial entity of Greece

The 74 regional units are administrative units of Greece. They are subdivisions of the country's 13 regions, further subdivided into municipalities. They were introduced as part of the Kallikratis administrative reform on 1 January 2011 and are comparable in area and, in the mainland, coterminous with the 'pre-Kallikratis' prefectures of Greece.

Decentralized Administration of Macedonia and Thrace

The Decentralized Administration of Macedonia and Thrace is one of the seven decentralized administrations of Greece, consisting of the peripheries of Central Macedonia and Eastern Macedonia and Thrace. Seated in Thessaloniki, Central Macedonia.

Kallikratis Plan Greek administrative reform

The Kallikratis Programme is the common name of Greek law 3852/2010, a major administrative reform in Greece. It brought upon the second major reform of the country's administrative divisions following the 1997 Kapodistrias reform.

Decentralized Administration of Epirus and Western Macedonia

The Decentralized Administration of Epirus and Western Macedonia is one of the seven decentralized administrations of Greece, consisting of the peripheries of Epirus and Western Macedonia. Seated in Ioannina, Epirus, it is currently led by Acting Secretary-General Vasileios Michelakis.

Decentralized Administration of Thessaly and Central Greece

The Decentralized Administration of Thessaly and Central Greece is one of the seven decentralized administrations of Greece, consisting of the peripheries of Thessaly and Central Greece. Seated in Larissa, Thessaly, it is currently led by Acting Secretary-General Ilias Tseligas.

Decentralized Administration of Crete administrative area of Greece covering the island of Crete

The Decentralized Administration of Crete is one of the seven decentralized administrations of Greece, solely consisting of the region of Crete. Its seat is in Heraklion.

The decentralized administrations are the third level of administrative divisions in Greece. They were created in January 2011 as part of a far-reaching reform of the country's administrative structure, the Kallikratis reform.

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