SpaceX Crew-1

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Notes

  1. From an orbital dynamics perspective, the forward port is easier to approach, and therefore new vehicles use this approach for their first live docking. The Crew Dragon Endeavor made its second docking on Crew-2 on 2 May 2021; therefore, Crew-1 relocated to the zenith port to clear the forward port for Crew-2. [3]
  2. The Crew Dragon Demo-2 mission was the first crewed flight, but was considered as a test flight, not an operational flight
  3. 15 November 2020 19:27:17 Eastern Standard Time (EST), 16 November 2020 00:27:17 UTC

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SpaceX Crew-1
ISS-64 SpaceX Crew-1 docked to IDA-2.jpg
Resilience docked to the International Space Station.
NamesUSCV-1 (2012–2019)
Crew-1
Mission type ISS crew transport
Operator SpaceX
COSPAR ID 2020-084A OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
SATCAT no. 46920 OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
Mission duration167 days, 6 hours and 29 minutes
Spacecraft properties
Spacecraft Crew Dragon   Resilience
Bus SpaceX Dragon 2
ManufacturerSpaceX
Launch mass12,519 kg (27,600 lb)
Landing mass9,616 kg (21,200 lb)
Crew
Crew size4
Members
Expedition Expedition 64 / 65
Start of mission
Launch date16 November 2020,
00:27:17 UTC [1]
Rocket Falcon 9 Block 5 (B1061.1)
Launch site Kennedy Space Center, LC-39A
ContractorSpaceX
End of mission
Recovered by GO Navigator
Landing date2 May 2021, 06:56:33 UTC
Landing site Gulf of Mexico
Orbital parameters
Reference system Geocentric orbit
Regime Low Earth orbit
Inclination 51.66°
Docking with ISS
Docking port Harmony forward
Docking date17 November 2020, 04:01 UTC [2]
Undocking date5 April 2021, 10:30 UTC
Time docked139 days