Tibetan Volunteers for Animals

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Tibetan Volunteers for Animals or TVA is an environmental group in parts of India and Tibet which aim to improve the quality and treatment of wild animals such as the yak in Tibet by encouraging local people to become vegetarian or to restrict their intake of meat.

India Country in South Asia

India, also known as the Republic of India, is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh largest country by area and with more than 1.3 billion people, it is the second most populous country and the most populous democracy in the world. Bounded by the Indian Ocean on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal on the southeast, it shares land borders with Pakistan to the west; China, Nepal, and Bhutan to the northeast; and Bangladesh and Myanmar to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka and the Maldives, while its Andaman and Nicobar Islands share a maritime border with Thailand and Indonesia.

Tibet plateau region in Asia

Tibet is a historical region covering much of the Tibetan Plateau in Inner Asia. It is the traditional homeland of the Tibetan people as well as some other ethnic groups such as Monpa, Tamang, Qiang, Sherpa, and Lhoba peoples and is now also inhabited by considerable numbers of Han Chinese and Hui people. Tibet is the highest region on Earth, with an average elevation of 4,900 metres (16,000 ft). The highest elevation in Tibet is Mount Everest, Earth's highest mountain, rising 8,848 m (29,029 ft) above sea level.

Meat animal flesh eaten as food

Meat is animal flesh that is eaten as food. Humans have hunted and killed animals for meat since prehistoric times. The advent of civilization allowed the domestication of animals such as chickens, sheep, rabbits, pigs and cattle. This eventually led to their use in meat production on an industrial scale with the aid of slaughterhouses.

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The group has been involved in various information campaigns since 2000. [1]

Some issues of TVA's magazine Semchen, in Tibetan and English, highlight the Buddha's teachings about living meat-free. [2]

See also

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Tibet Autonomous Region Autonomous region

The Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) or Xizang Autonomous Region, called Tibet or Xizang for short, is a province-level autonomous region in southwest China. It was formally established in 1965 to replace the Tibet Area, an administrative division the People's Republic of China (PRC) took over from the Republic of China (ROC), about five years after the dismissal of the Kashag by the PRC following the 1959 Tibetan uprising, and about 13 years after Tibet's incorporation into the PRC in 1951.

Domestic yak the domestic yak as a species, for the wild yak or the joint species use Q26547; for the domestic yak as a subspecies use Q12022233

The domestic yak is a long-haired domesticated bovid found throughout the Himalayan region of the Indian subcontinent, the Tibetan Plateau and as far north as Mongolia and Russia. It is descended from the wild yak.

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Tibetan people ethnic group

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Changpa

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References

  1. Zangmo, Chonyid (May 23, 2005). "Tibetan Volunteers for Animals: Campaign in Nepal", Phayul.com. Retrieved July 30, 2010.
  2. Caroline Martin, TVA Brings Vegetarianism to Buddhism's Birthplace, December 30, 2006