Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district

Last updated

Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district
Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district
Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district
Interactive map of district boundaries
Representative
  Scott Perry
RDillsburg
Population (2021)758,088 [1]
Median household
income
$72,620
Ethnicity
Cook PVI R+5 [2]

Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district is located in the south-central region of the state. It encompasses all of Dauphin County as well as parts of Cumberland County and York County. The district includes the cities of Harrisburg and York. Prior to 2019, the district was located in the northeastern part of the state. The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania redrew the district in 2018 after ruling the previous map unconstitutional due to gerrymandering. The court added State College to the old district's boundaries while removing some Democratic-leaning areas and redesignated it the twelfth district, and they reassigned the tenth district to an area around Harrisburg and York. The new tenth district is represented by Republican Scott Perry, who previously represented the old fourth district. [3]

Contents

The district was one of the 12 original districts created prior to the 4th Congress. In 2006, when it was still located in northeastern Pennsylvania, the 10th district experienced one of the greatest party shifts among all House seats that switched party control: in 2004, Republican Don Sherwood won with an 86% margin of victory over his nearest opponent and two years later, Democrat Chris Carney unseated Sherwood by a 53%–47% margin. [4] In 2008, Carney won reelection by 12 points but the district swung back in 2010, electing Republican Tom Marino. The district was mostly Republican in its political composition, an aspect of the district that was reflected especially well in presidential elections. In 2004, President George W. Bush won 60 percent of the vote in the district and in 2008, Senator John McCain beat Senator Barack Obama here by a margin of 54 percent to 45 percent. Nonetheless, Carney easily won reelection as a Democrat the same year McCain won the district. However, in the 2010 midterm elections, Marino unseated Carney by a 55%–45% margin. In 2016, local businessman and former mayor of Lewisburg, Mike Molesevich challenged Marino for the seat, but he fell to the Republican in November by more than two to one. In 2018, Marino won election to a redrawn 12th district; while he remained the congressman for the 10th district into January 2019, he moved within the new district's boundaries beforehand.

Demographics

According to the APM Research Lab's Voter Profile Tools [5] (featuring the U.S. Census Bureau's 2019 American Community Survey), the district contained about 559,000 potential voters (citizens, age 18+). Of these, 80% are White, 10% Black, and 6% Latino. Immigrants make up 5% of the district's potential voters. Median income among households (with one or more potential voter) in the district is about $67,300, while 9% of households live below the poverty line. As for the educational attainment of potential voters in the district, 9% of those 25 and older have not earned a high school diploma, while 30% hold a bachelor's or higher degree.

District boundaries 2003–2013

2003-2013 Pa10 109.gif
2003–2013

The Pennsylvania 10th was the third-largest congressional district in the state. The district encompassed the following counties and areas: [6] [7]

District boundaries 2013–2019

2013-2019 Pennsylvania US Congressional District 10 (since 2013).tif
2013–2019

On June 8, 2012, The Pennsylvania Legislative Reapportionment Commission adopted a revised final redistricting plan. [8] On May 8, 2013, The state Supreme Court unanimously approved the Legislative Reapportionment Commission's 2012 Revised Final Plan. [9] The resulting district encompassed the following areas: [10]

2016 election

Primary

Rep. Tom Marino declared his intent to run for his 4th term and was uncontested in the Republican primary. Originally, no Democratic candidates filed to run for office, upon this revelation, Mike Molesevich, an environmental contractor and former Lewisburg mayor, announced he would seek a write-in campaign to get on the general election ballot. [11] [12] Write-in candidates need over 1,000 votes in the primary election to appear on the ballot in the 2016 general election. [13] Mike Molesevich succeeded in his effort, receiving 2425 votes, earning a spot on the general election ballot. [14] Jerry Kairnes of Lycoming County announced that he would seek to be on the November ballot as an Independent, but dropped out after Molesevich earned a spot on the ballot [15]

Recent elections

2006 election

2006 United States House of Representatives elections: Pennsylvania District 10 [16]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Christopher Carney 110,11552.90
Republican Don Sherwood 97,86247.01

2008 election

2008 United States House of Representatives elections: Pennsylvania District 10 [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Christopher Carney (incumbent)160,83756.33
Republican Chris Hackett 124,68143.67

2010 election

2010 United States House of Representatives elections: Pennsylvania District 10 [18]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Tom Marino 109,60355
Democratic Christopher Carney (incumbent)89,17045

2012 election

2012 10th Congressional District of Pennsylvania elections
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Tom Marino (Incumbent)179,56365.6
Democratic Phil Scollo 94,22734.4

2014 election

2014 10th Congressional District of Pennsylvania elections
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Tom Marino (Incumbent)112,85162.6
Democratic Scott Brion 44,73724.8
Independent Nick Troiano 22,73412.6

2016 election

2016 10th Congressional District of Pennsylvania elections [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Tom Marino (Incumbent)211,28270.2
Democratic Michael Molesevich89,82329.8

2018 election

2018 10th congressional district of Pennsylvania election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Scott Perry (redistricted incumbent) 149,365 51.3
Democratic George Scott141,66848.7
Total votes291,033 100.0
Republican hold

2020 election

2020 10th congressional district of Pennsylvania election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Scott Perry (Incumbent) 208,896 53.3 +2.0
Democratic Eugene DePasquale 182,93846.7−2.0
Total votes391,834 100.0
Republican hold Swing +2.0

2022 election

2022 10th congressional district of Pennsylvania election [20]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Scott Perry (incumbent) 169,331 53.8
Democratic Shamaine Daniels145,21546.2
Total votes314,546 100.0
Republican hold

List of members representing the district

District created in 1795.

1795–1813: One seat

Cong
ress
YearsRepresentativePartyElectoral history
4th
5th
March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1799
David Bard Democratic-Republican Elected in 1794.
Re-elected in 1796.
Lost re-election.
6th
7th
March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1803
Henry Woods, 1764 - 1826.jpg
Henry Woods
Federalist Elected in 1798.
Re-elected in 1800.
Redistricted to the 7th district and lost re-election.
8th March 4, 1803 –
October 15, 1804
William Hoge Democratic-Republican Redistricted from the 12th district and re-elected in 1802.
Resigned.
October 15, 1804 –
November 27, 1804
Vacant
November 27, 1804 –
March 3, 1805
John Hoge Democratic-Republican Elected November 2, 1804 to finish his brother's term and seated November 27, 1804.
Retired.
9th March 4, 1805 –
March 3, 1807
John Hamilton Democratic-Republican Elected in 1804.
Lost re-election.
10th March 4, 1807 –
March 3, 1809
William Hoge Democratic-Republican Elected in 1806.
Retired.
11th
12th
March 4, 1809 –
March 3, 1813
Aaron Lyle Democratic-Republican Elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Redistricted to the 12th district .

1813–1823: Two seats

Cong
ress
YearsSeat ASeat B
RepresentativePartyElectoral historyRepresentativePartyElectoral history
13th March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1815
Isaac Smith Democratic-Republican Elected in 1812.
Lost re-election.
Jared Irwin Democratic-Republican Elected in 1812.
Retired.
14th March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1817
William Wilson Democratic-Republican Elected in 1814.
Re-elected in 1816.
Retired.
15th March 4, 1817 –
?, 1817
David Scott Democratic-Republican Elected in 1816.
Resigned.
 ?, 1817 –
October 14, 1817
Vacant
October 14, 1817 –
March 3, 1819
John Murray Democratic-Republican Elected to finish Scott's term.
Re-elected in 1818.
Retired.
16th March 4, 1819 –
March 3, 1821
George Denison Democratic-Republican Elected in 1818.
Re-elected in 1820.
Retired.
17th March 4, 1821 –
?, 1821
William Cox Ellis Democratic-Republican Elected in 1820.
Resigned and lost re-election.
 ?, 1821 –
October 9, 1821
Vacant
October 9, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
Thomas Murray Jr. Democratic-Republican Elected to finish Ellis's term.
Retired.

1823–present: One seat

Cong
ress
YearsRepresentativePartyElectoral history
18th
19th
March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
James S. Mitchell Democratic-Republican Redistricted from the 4th district and re-elected in 1822.
Re-elected in 1824.
Retired.
March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
Jacksonian
20th
21st
22nd
March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1833
Adam King Jacksonian Elected in 1826.
Re-elected in 1828.
Re-elected in 1830.
Lost re-election.
23rd
24th
March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1837
William Clark Anti-Masonic Elected in 1832.
Re-elected in 1834.
Retired.
25th March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
Luther Reily Democratic Elected in 1836.
Retired.
26th
27th
March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1843
William Simonton Whig Elected in 1838.
Re-elected in 1840.
[ data unknown/missing ]
28th
29th
30th
March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1849
Richard Brodhead (US Senator from Pennsylvania).jpg
Richard Brodhead
Democratic Elected in 1843.
Re-elected in 1844.
Re-elected in 1846.
Retired.
31st
32nd
March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1853
Milo M. Dimmick Democratic Elected in 1848.
Re-elected in 1850.
Retired.
33rd March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
Ner Middleswarth (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Ner Middleswarth
Whig Elected in 1852.
Retired.
34th
35th
March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
John C. Kunkel (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
John C. Kunkel
Opposition Elected in 1854.
Re-elected in 1856.
Retired.
March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
Republican
36th
37th
March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1863
John W. Killinger Republican Elected in 1858.
Re-elected in 1860.
Retired.
38th
39th
March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1867
Myer Strouse (Pennsylvania Congressman) cropped.jpg
Myer Strouse
Democratic Elected in 1862.
Re-elected in 1864.
Retired.
40th
41st
March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1871
Henry L. Cake (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Henry L. Cake
Republican Elected in 1866.
Re-elected in 1868.
Lost renomination.
42nd
43rd
March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1875
John W. Killinger Republican Elected in 1870.
Re-elected in 1872.
Retired.
44th March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
William Mutchler (Congressman from Pennsylvania).jpg
William Mutchler
Democratic Elected in 1874.
Retired.
45th March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1879
Samuel Augustus Bridges - Brady-Handy.jpg
Samuel A. Bridges
Democratic Elected in 1876.
Retired.
46th March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1881
ReubenKnechtBachman1.jpg
Reuben K. Bachman
Democratic Elected in 1878.
Retired.
47th
48th
March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1885
William Mutchler (Congressman from Pennsylvania).jpg
William Mutchler
Democratic Elected in 1880.
Re-elected in 1882.
Retired.
49th
50th
March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1889
William H. Sowden (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
William H. Sowden
Democratic Elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886.
Retired.
51st
52nd
53rd
54th
55th
56th
57th
March 4, 1889 –
March 16, 1901
BROSIUS, Marriott (BEP engraved portrait).jpg
Marriott Brosius
Republican Elected in 1888.
Re-elected in 1890.
Re-elected in 1892.
Re-elected in 1894.
Re-elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Died.
57th March 16, 1901 –
November 5, 1901
Vacant
November 5, 1901 –
March 3, 1903
Henry Burd Cassel.jpg
Henry B. Cassel
Republican Elected to finish Brosius's term.
Redistricted to the 9th district .
58th March 4, 1903 –
February 10, 1904
GeorgeHowellPA.jpg
George Howell
Democratic Lost contested election.
February 10, 1904 –
March 3, 1905
William Connell (Pennsylvania politician).jpg
William Connell
Republican Won contested election.
[ data unknown/missing ]
59th March 4, 1905 –
March 3, 1907
Thomas H. Dale (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Thomas H. Dale
Republican Elected in 1904.
Lost re-election.
60th
61st
March 4, 1907 –
March 3, 1911
ThomasDavidNicholls.jpg
Thomas D. Nicholls
Independent
Democratic
Elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Retired.
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
March 4, 1911 –
March 3, 1919
JohnRFarr.jpg
John R. Farr
Republican Elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Lost re-election.
66th March 4, 1919 –
February 25, 1921
PatrickMcLane.jpg
Patrick McLane
Democratic Lost contested election.
February 25, 1921 –
March 3, 1921
JohnRFarr.jpg
John R. Farr
Republican Won contested election.
Lost renomination.
67th March 4, 1921 –
September 26, 1922
Charles R. Connell (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Charles R. Connell
Republican Elected in 1920.
Died.
September 26, 1922 –
March 3, 1923
Vacant
68th
69th
70th
71st
March 4, 1923 –
December 5, 1929
William W. Griest (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
William W. Griest
Republican Redistricted from the 9th district and re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Died.
71st December 5, 1929 –
January 28, 1930
Vacant
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
January 28, 1930 –
January 3, 1945
JRolandKinzer.jpg
J. Roland Kinzer
Republican Elected to finish Griest's term.
Re-elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Redistricted to the 9th district .
79th January 3, 1945 –
July 17, 1946
JohnWMurphyWedding (cropped).png
John W. Murphy
Democratic Redistricted from the 11th district and re-elected in 1944.
Resigned to become U.S. District Judge.
80th November 5, 1946 –
January 3, 1949
James P. Scoblick Republican Elected to complete Murphy's term.
Elected in 1946.
Lost renomination.
81st
82nd
January 3, 1949 –
January 3, 1953
Harry P. O'Neill (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Harry P. O'Neill
Democratic Elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Lost renomination.
83rd
84th
85th
January 3, 1953 –
January 3, 1959
Joseph L. Carrigg, Pennsylvania Congressman.jpg
Joseph L. Carrigg
Republican Redistricted from the 14th district and re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Lost renomination.
86th January 3, 1959 –
January 3, 1961
Stanley A. Prokop (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Stanley A. Prokop
Democratic Elected in 1958.
Lost renomination.
87th January 3, 1961 –
January 3, 1963
Wm Scranton Pennsylvania 87th Cong.png
William Scranton
Republican Elected in 1960.
Elected Governor of Pennsylvania.
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1999
JoeMcDade.jpg
Joseph M. McDade
Republican Elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Retired.
106th
107th
108th
109th
January 3, 1999 –
January 3, 2007
Don Sherwood portrait.jpg
Don Sherwood
Republican Elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Lost re-election.
110th
111th
January 3, 2007 –
January 3, 2011
Chris Carney.jpg
Chris Carney
Democratic Elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Lost re-election.
112th
113th
114th
115th
January 3, 2011 –
January 3, 2019
Tom Marino Official Portrait, 112th Congress (cropped 2).jpg
Tom Marino
Republican Elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Redistricted to the 12th district .
116th
117th
118th
January 3, 2019 –
present
Scott Perry official photo.jpg
Scott Perry
Republican Redistricted from the 4th district and re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.
Re-elected in 2022.

See also

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References

Notes

  1. "My Congressional District: Congressional District 10 (117th Congress), Pennsylvania". United States Census Bureau .
  2. "2022 Cook PVI℠: District Map and List". Cook Political Report. Retrieved January 10, 2023.
  3. Cohn, Nate; Bloch, Matthew; Quealy, Kevin (February 19, 2018). "The New Pennsylvania House Districts Are In. We Review the Mapmakers' Choices". The Upshot. The New York Times. Retrieved February 20, 2018.
  4. "2006 Election Results: U.S. House". The New York Times . November 8, 2006. Retrieved November 9, 2006.
  5. "Representing US: 2020 Voter Profiles". APM Research Lab. Retrieved October 22, 2020.
  6. "109th Congressional District Wall Maps". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 11, 2007.
  7. "Pennsylvania 109th Congressional Districts and Counties". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 11, 2007.
  8. "PA Redistricting Press Release" (PDF).
  9. "Welcome to Pennsylvania Redistricting – Legislative Redistricting". www.redistricting.state.pa.us. Retrieved April 9, 2016.
  10. "PA Final Redistricting Map PDF" (PDF).
  11. "Home". Mike for Congress. Archived from the original on June 10, 2016. Retrieved June 23, 2016.
  12. "Molesevich mounts campaign". standard-journal.com. Retrieved April 9, 2016.
  13. "Mike Molesevich of Lewisburg is running for US congress |". wkok.com. Retrieved April 9, 2016.
  14. KRAWCZENIUK, BORYS. "Marino to have Dem opponent" . Retrieved July 7, 2016.
  15. "North Central PA" . Retrieved April 11, 2016.
  16. "State Races: Pennsylvania". Pennsylvania 2006 Midterm Election. The Green Papers. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  17. "State Races: Pennsylvania". Pennsylvania 2008 General Election. The Green Papers. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  18. "State Races: Pennsylvania". Pennsylvania 2010 Mid-Term Election. MSNBC. Archived from the original on November 7, 2010. Retrieved November 7, 2010.
  19. "2016 Presidential Election Official Returns: Representative in Congress". Pennsylvania Department of State. November 8, 2016. Retrieved July 21, 2018.
  20. "2022 General Election Official Returns - Representative in Congress". Pennsylvania Department of State.

Coordinates: 41°22′22″N76°31′24″W / 41.37278°N 76.52333°W / 41.37278; -76.52333