Waupaca County, Wisconsin

Last updated
Waupaca County, Wisconsin
WaupacaCountyWisconsinCourthouse.jpg
Waupaca County Courthouse
Map of Wisconsin highlighting Waupaca County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Wisconsin
Map of USA WI.svg
Wisconsin's location within the U.S.
Founded1853
Seat Waupaca
Largest city New London
Area
  Total765 sq mi (1,981 km2)
  Land748 sq mi (1,937 km2)
  Water17 sq mi (44 km2), 2.3%
Population (est.)
  (2018)51,128
  Density70/sq mi (30/km2)
Congressional district 8th
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5
Website www.co.waupaca.wi.us

Waupaca County is a county in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2010 census, the population was 52,410. [1] The county seat is Waupaca. [2] The county was created in 1851 and organized in 1853. [3] It is named after the Waupaca River, a Menominee language name meaning 'white sand bottom', 'pale water', or 'tomorrow river'. [4] [5]

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, a county is an administrative or political subdivision of a state that consists of a geographic region with specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs, respectively.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names. The term does not describe or provide for any specific political status or legal relationship when used by a state.

Wisconsin A north-central state of the United States of America

Wisconsin is a U.S. state located in the north-central United States, in the Midwest and Great Lakes regions. It is bordered by Minnesota to the west, Iowa to the southwest, Illinois to the south, Lake Michigan to the east, Michigan to the northeast, and Lake Superior to the north. Wisconsin is the 23rd largest state by total area and the 20th most populous. The state capital is Madison, and its largest city is Milwaukee, which is located on the western shore of Lake Michigan. The state is divided into 72 counties.

Contents

History

Ancient indigenous peoples constructed earthworks that expressed their religious and political concepts. An early European explorer counted 72 such earthen mounds in what is now Waupaca County, many of them in the form of effigy mounds, shaped like "humans, turtles, catfish and others." [6] There were 52 mounds constructed around what is now called Taylor Lake. Most mounds were lost to agricultural development. One mound, shaped like a catfish, is still visible in a private yard along County Hwy. QQ, just east of Taylor Lake. The site was marked by a local women's club with a commemorative plaque installed on a large stone. [6]

Earthworks (archaeology) General term to describe artificial changes in land level

In archaeology, earthworks are artificial changes in land level, typically made from piles of artificially placed or sculpted rocks and soil. Earthworks can themselves be archaeological features, or they can show features beneath the surface.

Effigy Representation of a person through art

An effigy is a representation of a specific person in the form of sculpture or some other three-dimensional medium. The use of the term is normally restricted to certain contexts in a somewhat arbitrary way: recumbent effigies on tombs are so called, but standing statues of individuals, or busts, are usually not. Likenesses of religious figures in sculpture are not normally called effigies. Effigies are common elements of funerary art, especially as a recumbent effigy in stone or metal placed on a tomb, or a less permanent "funeral effigy", placed on the coffin in a grand funeral, wearing real clothing.

Under pressure from European-American development, the Menominee people ceded their title to the United States for these lands by treaty in 1852. Following that, the flow of new migrant settlers greatly increased from the East, with people moving from New England, New York, and Ohio. They developed the land primarily for agricultural use in the early decades, also quickly establishing sawmills on the rivers.

In the 1870s railroads were constructed in the county: the Wisconsin Central in 1872 and the Green Bay and Minnesota Railroad (later known as Green Bay, Minnesota & St. Paul) in 1873. These improved the county's connections to markets for its lumber and other products. For a period, entrepreneurs and merchants gained high profits from the lumber industry, establishing many fine homes in the larger cities.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 765 square miles (1,980 km2), of which 748 square miles (1,940 km2) is land and 17 square miles (44 km2) (2.3%) is water. [7] The water includes 43-acre Taylor Lake, one of a chain of lakes in the county. It has bluegill, brook trout, largemouth bass, muskellunge (muskie), Northern Pike, Tiger Muskellunge (Tiger Muskie) and Walleye fish.

Major highways

Wisconsin Highway 22 highway in Wisconsin

State Trunk Highway 22 is a state highway in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. The route's trajectory is mostly south to north, with the exception of the segment between Shawano and the northern terminus being east–west. It is generally a two-lane surface road providing a connecting route between Waupaca, Shawano, Gillett and Oconto. Various urban sections have multilane segments.

State Trunk Highway 49 is a state highway in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. It runs north–south in central and southeast Wisconsin from Wittenberg to Lomira.

State Trunk Highway 54 is a Wisconsin state highway running east–west across central Wisconsin. It is 243.12 miles (391.26 km) in length.

Airports

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1860 8,851
1870 15,53975.6%
1880 20,95534.9%
1890 26,79427.9%
1900 31,61518.0%
1910 32,7823.7%
1920 34,2004.3%
1930 33,513−2.0%
1940 34,6143.3%
1950 35,0561.3%
1960 35,3400.8%
1970 37,7806.9%
1980 42,83113.4%
1990 46,1047.6%
2000 51,73112.2%
2010 52,4101.3%
Est. 201851,128 [8] −2.4%
U.S. Decennial Census [9]
1790–1960 [10] 1900–1990 [11]
1990–2000 [12] 2010–2014 [1]
2000 Census Age Pyramid for Waupaca County USA Waupaca County, Wisconsin age pyramid.svg
2000 Census Age Pyramid for Waupaca County

As of the census [13] of 2000, there were 51,731 people, 19,863 households, and 13,884 families residing in the county. The population density was 69 per square mile (27/km2). There were 22,508 housing units at an average density of 30 per square mile (12/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.93% White, 0.17% Black or African American, 0.42% Native American, 0.27% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.54% from other races, and 0.66% from two or more races. 1.38% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 53.1% were of German, 8.5% Norwegian and 6.8% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000. 96.6% spoke English, 1.4% Spanish and 1.3% German as their first language.

There were 19,863 households out of which 32.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.40% were married couples living together, 7.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.10% were non-families. 25.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.01.

By age, 25.70% of the population was under 18, 7.10% from 18 to 24, 27.80% from 25 to 44, 22.70% from 45 to 64, and 16.70% who were 65 or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 100.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.40 males.

In 2017, there were 505 births, giving a general fertility rate of 63.4 births per 1000 women aged 15–44, the 37th highest rate out of all 72 Wisconsin counties. Of these, 26 of the births occurred at home. [14] Additionally, there were 23 reported induced abortions performed on women of Waupaca County residence in 2017, a figure lower than the records for the preceding four years. [15]

Government

County offices

Politics

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [16]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 62.1%16,20932.4% 8,4515.5% 1,435
2012 54.2%14,00244.8% 11,5781.0% 260
2008 48.0% 12,23250.8%12,9521.3% 327
2004 59.1%15,94140.0% 10,7920.9% 241
2000 56.9%12,98038.5% 8,7874.5% 1,037
1996 45.1%8,67940.5% 7,80014.4% 2,764
1992 44.3%10,25228.8% 6,66627.0% 6,241
1988 61.6%11,55937.7% 7,0780.6% 120
1984 68.3%13,09730.8% 5,8950.9% 175
1980 61.7%12,56831.4% 6,4016.9% 1,397
1976 60.1%10,84938.0% 6,8571.9% 337
1972 70.1%11,04028.1% 4,4181.8% 284
1968 67.1%10,60625.2% 3,9787.7% 1,215
1964 54.5%8,38145.4% 6,9900.1% 18
1960 72.6%12,24727.3% 4,6060.1% 14
1956 78.6%11,79820.9% 3,1330.5% 72
1952 81.4%13,69318.5% 3,1050.2% 28
1948 67.5%8,76431.0% 4,0201.5% 198
1944 74.4%11,49525.1% 3,8790.4% 68
1940 70.0%11,09929.1% 4,6161.0% 151
1936 45.9% 6,68047.5%6,9206.6% 961
1932 37.5% 5,08260.4%8,1792.0% 275
1928 72.3%8,92826.8% 3,3070.9% 110
1924 33.9% 3,6546.2% 66559.9%6,462
1920 83.0%8,3028.9% 8888.1% 807
1916 69.9%4,49226.8% 1,7203.4% 219
1912 37.7%2,20426.7% 1,56335.6% 2,086
1908 71.9%4,78522.3% 1,4835.8% 384
1904 81.3%5,47114.0% 9424.7% 313
1900 76.3%5,28420.0% 1,3833.7% 259
1896 75.2%5,47221.7% 1,5773.2% 229
1892 57.2%3,39736.8% 2,1865.9% 353

Communities

Waupaca County Fairgrounds WaupacaCountyWisconsinFairgrounds.jpg
Waupaca County Fairgrounds

Cities

Villages

Towns

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Ghost towns/neighborhoods

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2014.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. "Wisconsin: Individual County Chronologies". Wisconsin Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2007. Retrieved August 15, 2015.
  4. "Here's How Iron Got Its Name". The Rhinelander Daily News. June 16, 1932. p. 2. Retrieved August 24, 2014 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  5. "Winnebago Took Its Name from an Indian Tribe". The Post-Crescent. December 28, 1963. p. 14. Retrieved August 25, 2014 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  6. 1 2 Waupaca Area Chamber of Commerce
  7. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2015.
  8. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved July 26, 2019.
  9. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 9, 2015.
  10. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 9, 2015.
  11. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 9, 2015.
  12. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved August 9, 2015.
  13. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  14. Annual Wisconsin Birth and Infant Mortality Report, 2017 P-01161-19 (June 2019): Detailed Tables
  15. Reported Induced Abortions in Wisconsin, Office of Health Informatics, Division of Public Health, Wisconsin Department of Health Services. Section: Trend Information, 2013-2017, Table 18, pages 17-18
  16. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-08-14.

Further reading

Coordinates: 44°29′N88°58′W / 44.48°N 88.97°W / 44.48; -88.97