List of positions filled by presidential appointment with Senate confirmation

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This is a list of positions filled by presidential appointment with Senate confirmation. Under the Appointments Clause of the United States Constitution and law of the United States, certain federal positions appointed by the president of the United States require confirmation (advice and consent) of the United States Senate.

Contents

These "PAS" (Presidential Appointment needing Senate confirmation) [1] positions, as well as other types of federal government positions, are published in the United States Government Policy and Supporting Positions (Plum Book), which is released after each United States presidential election. [2] A 2012 Congressional Research Service study estimated that approximately 1200-1400 positions require Senate confirmation. [3]

Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry

Department of Agriculture

Independent agencies

Committee on Armed Services

Department of Defense

Office of the Secretary of Defense

Department of the Air Force

Department of the Army

Department of the Navy

Joint Chiefs of Staff

Department of Energy

Independent agencies

Judicial branch

Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs

Department of Commerce

Department of Housing and Urban Development

Department of Transportation

Department of the Treasury

Executive Office of the President

Independent agencies

Committee on the Budget

Executive Office of the President

Office of Management and Budget

Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation

Department of Commerce

Department of Homeland Security

Department of Transportation

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Executive Office of the President

Office of Science and Technology Policy

Independent agencies

Committee on Energy and Natural Resources

Department of Energy

Department of the Interior

Committee on Environment and Public Works

Department of Commerce

Department of Defense

Department of the Interior

Department of Transportation

Executive Office of the President

Environmental Protection Agency

Other independent agencies

Committee on Finance

Department of Commerce

Department of Health and Human Services

Department of Homeland Security

Department of the Treasury

Executive Office of the President

Office of the United States Trade Representative

Other independent agencies

Judicial branch

Committee on Foreign Relations

Department of State

United States Mission to the United Nations

United States Agency for International Development

International Bank for Reconstruction and Development

International Development Association

International Finance Corporation

Other independent agencies

Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions

Department of Education

Department of Health and Human Services

Department of Labor

Independent agencies

Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs

Department of Commerce

Department of Homeland Security

Executive Office of the President

Office of Management and Budget

Independent agencies

Legislative branch

Judicial branch

Committee on Indian Affairs

Department of Health and Human Services

Department of the Interior

Select Committee on Intelligence

Department of Justice

Department of State

Department of the Treasury

Central Intelligence Agency

Office of the Director of National Intelligence

Committee on the Judiciary

Department of Commerce

Department of Homeland Security

Department of Justice

Executive Office of the President

Office of National Drug Control Policy

Independent agencies

Judicial branch

Committee on Rules and Administration

Independent agencies

Legislative branch

Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship

Small Business Administration

Committee on Veterans' Affairs

Department of Labor

Department of Veterans Affairs

Judicial branch

Former Senate-confirmed positions

There are a number of positions that required Senate confirmation of appointees in the past, but do not today. The Presidential Appointment Efficiency and Streamlining Act of 2011 (Pub.L.   112–166 (text) (pdf)), signed into law on August 10, 2012, eliminates the requirement of Senate approval for 163 positions, allowing the president alone to appoint persons to these positions: [7] Parts of the act went into effect immediately, while other parts took effect on October 9, 2012, 60 days after enactment. [7]

The act also eliminated entirely the positions of Assistant Secretary of Defense for Networks and Information Integration and Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs. [7]

See also

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References

  1. NLRB v. SW General, Inc. , no. 15-1251 (March 21, 2017) U.S. Supreme Court
  2. "Plum Book: About". Government Publishing Office. Archived from the original on November 30, 2016. Retrieved April 29, 2016.
  3. Plumer, Brad (July 16, 2013). "Does the Senate really need to confirm 1,200 executive branch jobs?". Washington Post. Retrieved June 27, 2014.
  4. "List of Ambassadorial Appointments". American Foreign Service Association. Retrieved November 16, 2016.
  5. Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act, Pub.L.   109–435 (text) (pdf)
  6. #113: 03-17-97 - Fy96 U.S. Attorneys' Report Shows Prosecutors Completed More Cases Against More Criminals
  7. 1 2 3 Maeve P. Carey, Presidential Appointments, the Senate's Confirmation Process, and Changes Made in the 112th Congress, Congressional Research Service, October 9, 2012.