Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district

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Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district
Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district
Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district
Interactive map of district boundaries (Lancaster County highlighted in red)
Representative
  Lloyd Smucker
RLancaster
Population (2021)755,278
Median household
income
$75,659
Cook PVI R+13 [1]

Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district is located in the southeast-central part of the state. It includes all of Lancaster County and portions of York County south and east of but not including the city of York. Republican Lloyd Smucker represents the district.

Contents

Prior to 2018, the 11th district was located in the east-central part of the state. The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania redrew the district in February 2018 after ruling the previous map unconstitutional, centering it around Pottsville and renumbering it as the ninth district. The new 11th district is essentially the successor to the old 16th District, with representation per the elections of 2018 onward. [2]

Republican Lou Barletta represented the 11th district within its former boundaries from 2011 to 2019, the first Republican to do so in almost 30 years.

Recent election results in statewide elections

YearOfficeResults
2000 President Gore 54 – 43%
2004 President Kerry 53 – 47%
2008 President Obama 57 – 42%
2012 President Romney 54 – 45%
2016 President Trump 60 – 36%
2020 President Trump 60 – 38%

[ citation needed ]

District boundaries 2003–2019

From 2003 to 2013 the district included Scranton, Wilkes-Barre, Hazleton and most of the Poconos. With a strong base in areas of industry and ethnic groups, it was once considered a very safe Democratic seat but has become more competitive in recent years. Former longtime Democratic incumbent Paul Kanjorski faced his closest contest ever in 2008, narrowly defeating Lou Barletta, the Republican mayor of Hazleton, 138,849 to 129,358. [3] In 2010, Kanjorski was unseated by Barletta in a 45%–55% vote. [4]

The district was substantially redrawn by the state legislature in the course of the 2012 redistricting after the 2010 census, significantly altering the 11th. It lost Scranton and Wilkes-Barre to the 17th district. To make up for the loss in population, the 11th was pushed into more rural and Republican-leaning territory to the north and south. It then stretched from the Poconos all the way to the suburbs of Harrisburg.

The district includes the most Amish communities of any congressional district in the United States. The current representative, Lloyd Smucker, belonged to the Old Order Amish at the time of his birth, but his family left the community when he was five years old. [5]

List of members representing the district

1795–1823: One seat

District created in 1795.

Cong
ress
RepresentativePartyYearsElectoral history
4th
5th
William Findley.jpg
William Findley
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1799
Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1794.
Re-elected in 1796.
Retired.
6th
7th
John Smilie Democratic-Republican March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1803
Elected in 1798.
Re-elected in 1800.
Redistricted to the 9th district .
8th
9th
John Baptiste Charles Lucas from Centennial History of Oregon.png
John B. C. Lucas
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 –
??, 1805
Elected in 1802.
Re-elected in 1804.
Resigned before Congress began to become U.S. District Judge.
9th Vacant ??, 1805 –
December 2, 1805
9th
10th
11th
Samuel Smith Democratic-Republican December 2, 1805 –
March 3, 1811
Elected October 8, 1805, to finish Lucas's term and seated December 2, 1805.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Lost re-election.
12th AbnerLacock.jpg
Abner Lacock
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1811 –
March 3, 1813
Elected in 1810.
Redistricted to the 15th district and re-elected in 1812 but resigned before term started because he was elected U.S. Senator.
13th
14th
William Findley.jpg
William Findley
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1817
Redistricted from the 8th district and Re-elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
Retired.
15th
16th
David Marchand Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1821
Elected in 1816.
Re-elected in 1818.
Retired.
17th George Plumer Democratic-Republican March 4, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
Elected in 1820.
Redistricted to the 17th district .

1823–1833: Two seats

Cong
ress
YearsSeat ASeat B
RepresentativePartyElectoral historyRepresentativePartyElectoral history
18th March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
James Wilson Democratic-Republican Elected in 1822.
Re-elected in 1824.
Re-elected in 1826.
Lost re-election.
John Findlay Democratic-Republican Redistricted from the 5th district and re-elected in 1822.
Re-elected in 1824.
Retired.
19th March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
Jacksonian Jacksonian
20th March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1829
William Ramsey Jacksonian Elected in 1826.
Re-elected in 1828.
Re-elected in 1830.
Died.
21st March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1831
Thomas H. Crawford Jacksonian Elected in 1828.
Re-elected in 1830.
Redistricted to the 12th district and lost re-election.
22nd March 4, 1831 –
September 29, 1831
September 29, 1831 –
November 22, 1831
Vacant
November 22, 1831 –
March 3, 1833
Robert McCoy Jacksonian Elected to finish Ransey's term.
[ data unknown/missing ]

1833–present: One seat

RepresentativePartyYearsCong
ress
Electoral history
Charles A. Barnitz Anti-Masonic March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1835
23rd Elected in 1832.
Lost re-election.
Henry Logan Jacksonian March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
24th
25th
Elected in 1834.
Re-elected in 1836.
Retired.
Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
James Gerry Democratic March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1843
26th
27th
Elected in 1838.
Re-elected in 1840.
Retired.
Benjamin A. Bidlack Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
28th Redistricted from the 15th district and re-elected in 1843.
[ data unknown/missing ]
Owen D. Leib Democratic March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
29th Elected in 1844.
Lost re-election.
Chester P. Butler Whig March 4, 1847 –
October 5, 1850
30th
31st
Elected in 1846.
Re-elected in 1848.
Died.
VacantOctober 5, 1850 –
January 13, 1851
31st
John Brisbin Democratic January 13, 1851 –
March 3, 1851
Elected to finish Butler's term.
Retired.
Henry M. Fuller (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Henry M. Fuller
Whig March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
32nd Elected in 1850.
Lost renomination.
Christian M. Straub Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd Elected in 1852.
Retired.
James Hepburn Campbell - Brady-Handy.jpg
James H. Campbell
Opposition March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th Elected in 1854.
Lost re-election.
WilliamLDewart.jpg
William L. Dewart
Democratic March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
35th Elected in 1856.
Lost re-election.
James Hepburn Campbell - Brady-Handy.jpg
James H. Campbell
Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1863
36th
37th
Elected in 1858.
Re-elected in 1860.
Retired.
Philip Johnson congressman.jpg
Philip Johnson
Democratic March 4, 1863 –
January 29, 1867
38th
39th
Redistricted from the 13th district and re-elected in 1862.
Re-elected in 1864.
Re-elected in 1866 but died before the next term began.
Died.
VacantJanuary 29, 1867 –
March 3, 1867
39th
Daniel Myers Van Auken - Brady-Handy.jpg
Daniel M. Van Auken
Democratic March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1871
40th
41st
Elected in 1867 to finish Johnson's term. [ citation needed ]
Re-elected in 1868.
Retired.
John B. Storm (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
John B. Storm
Democratic March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1875
42nd
43rd
Elected in 1870.
Re-elected in 1872
Retired.
FrancisDolanCollins.jpg
Francis D. Collins
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879
44th
45th
Elected in 1874.
Re-elected in 1876.
[ data unknown/missing ]
Robert Klotz - Brady-Handy.jpg
Robert Klotz
Democratic March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1883
46th
47th
Elected in 1878
Re-elected in 1880.
[ data unknown/missing ]
John B. Storm (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
John B. Storm
Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1887
48th
49th
Elected in 1882.
Re-elected in 1884.
Retired.
Charles R. Buckalew - Brady-Handy.jpg
Charles R. Buckalew
Democratic March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1889
50th Elected in 1886.
Redistricted to the 17th district .
Joseph A. Scranton (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Joseph A. Scranton
Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1891
51st Elected in 1888.
Lost re-election.
Lemuel Amerman.png
Lemuel Amerman
Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
52nd Elected in 1890.
Lost re-election.
Joseph A. Scranton (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Joseph A. Scranton
Republican March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1897
53rd
54th
Elected in 1892.
Elected in 1894.
Retired.
William Connell (Pennsylvania politician).jpg
William Connell
Republican March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1903
55th
56th
57th
Elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Redistricted to the 10th district .
Henry W. Palmer.jpg
Henry W. Palmer
Republican March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1907
58th
59th
Redistricted from the 12th district and re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
[ data unknown/missing ]
John Thomas Lenahan.png
John T. Lenahan
Democratic March 4, 1907 –
March 3, 1909
60th Elected in 1906.
Retired.
Henry W. Palmer.jpg
Henry W. Palmer
Republican March 4, 1909 –
March 3, 1911
61st Elected in 1908.
[ data unknown/missing ]
CharlesCalvinBowman.jpg
Charles C. Bowman
Republican March 4, 1911 –
December 12, 1912
62nd Elected in 1910.
Election contested [6] and seat declared vacant. [7]
Lost re-election.
VacantDecember 12, 1912 –
March 3, 1913
JohnJosephCasey (cropped).jpg
John J. Casey
Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1917
63rd
64th
Elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Lost re-election.
Thomas Weir Templeton.png
Thomas W. Templeton
Republican March 4, 1917 –
March 3, 1919
65th Elected in 1916.
Retired.
JohnJosephCasey (cropped).jpg
John J. Casey
Democratic March 4, 1919 –
March 3, 1921
66th Elected in 1918.
Lost re-election.
ClarenceDennisCoughlin.jpg
Clarence D. Coughlin
Republican March 3, 1921 –
March 3, 1923
67th Elected in 1920.
Lost re-election.
Laurence H. Waters of Penna. LCCN2016848464.tif
Laurence H. Watres
Republican March 4, 1923 –
March 3, 1931
68th
69th
70th
71st
Elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Retired.
PatrickJBoland.jpg
Patrick J. Boland
Democratic March 4, 1931 –
May 18, 1942
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
Elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Died.
VacantMay 18, 1942 –
November 3, 1942
77th
Veronica Grace Boland.jpg
Veronica Grace Boland
Democratic November 3, 1942 –
January 3, 1943
Elected to finish her husband's term. [lower-alpha 1]
Retired.
JohnWMurphyWedding (cropped).png
John W. Murphy
Democratic January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1945
78th Elected in 1942.
Redistricted to the 10th district .
Dan Flood.jpg
Daniel Flood
Democratic January 3, 1945 –
January 3, 1947
79th Elected in 1944.
Lost re-election.
Mitchell Jenkins (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Mitchell Jenkins
Republican January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1949
80th Elected in 1946.
Retired.
Dan Flood.jpg
Daniel Flood
Democratic January 3, 1949 –
January 3, 1953
81st
82nd
Elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Lost re-election.
Edward Bonin (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Edward Bonin
Republican January 3, 1953 –
January 3, 1955
83rd Elected in 1952.
Lost re-election.
Dan Flood.jpg
Daniel Flood
Democratic January 3, 1955 –
January 31, 1980
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
Elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Resigned due to allegations of bribery.
VacantJanuary 31, 1980 –
April 9, 1980
96th
Ray Musto circa 1980.jpg
Ray Musto
Democratic April 9, 1980 –
January 3, 1981
Elected to finish Flood's term.
Lost re-election.
James Nelligan.png
James Nelligan
Republican January 3, 1981 –
January 3, 1983
97th Elected in 1980.
Lost re-election.
Frank G. Harrison.jpg
Frank Harrison
Democratic January 3, 1983 –
January 3, 1985
98th Elected in 1982
Lost renomination.
Rep. Paul Kanjorski.jpg
Paul Kanjorski
Democratic January 3, 1985 –
January 3, 2011
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
Elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Lost re-election.
Lou Barletta, Official Portrait, 112th Congress (2).JPG
Lou Barletta
Republican January 3, 2011 –
January 3, 2019
112th
113th
114th
115th
Elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Redistricted to the 9th district and retired to run for U.S. Senator.
Lloyd Smucker official congressional photo.jpg
Lloyd Smucker
Republican January 3, 2019 –
present
116th
117th
118th
Redistricted from the 16th district and re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.
Re-elected in 2022.

Recent election results

2012

Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district, 2012 [8]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Lou Barletta (incumbent) 166,967 58.5
Democratic Gene Stilp118,23141.5
Total votes285,198 100.0
Republican hold

2014

Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district, 2014 [9]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Lou Barletta (incumbent) 122,464 66.3
Democratic Andrew Ostrowski62,22833.7
Total votes184,692 100.0
Republican hold

2016

Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district, 2016 [10]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Lou Barletta (incumbent) 199,421 63.7
Democratic Michael Marsicano113,80036.3
Total votes313,221 100.0
Republican hold

2018

Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district, 2018 [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Lloyd Smucker (incumbent) 163,708 59.0
Democratic Jess King113,87641.0
Total votes277,584 100.0
Republican hold

2020

Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district, 2020 [12]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Lloyd Smucker (incumbent) 241,915 63.1
Democratic Sarah Hammond141,32536.9
Total votes383,240 100.0
Republican hold

2022

Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district, 2022 [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Lloyd Smucker (incumbent) 194,991 61.5
Democratic Bob Hollister121,83538.5
Total votes316,826 100.0
Republican hold

Historical district boundaries

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. "2022 Cook PVI℠: District Map and List". Cook Political Report. Retrieved January 10, 2023.
  2. Cohn, Nate; Bloch, Matthew; Quealy, Kevin (February 19, 2018). "The New Pennsylvania House Districts Are In. We Review the Mapmakers' Choices". The Upshot. The New York Times. Retrieved February 20, 2018.
  3. http://scrantontimes.com/articles/2008/11/05/news/sc_times_trib.20081105.a.pg3.tt05congress11_s1.2062365_top3.txt [ bare URL plain text file ]
  4. "Election 2010: Pennsylvania: House of Representatives". The New York Times. Retrieved April 12, 2022.
  5. Writer, SAM JANESCH | Staff. "Meet Lloyd Smucker: Amish-born congressman seeking a second term on tax cuts and conservative record". LancasterOnline. Retrieved December 17, 2022.
  6. Cannon's Precedents (PDF). p. 168. Retrieved February 5, 2021.
  7. United States Congress. "Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district (id: B000703)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress .
  8. "Statistics of Presidential and Congressional Election of November 6, 2012". Karen Haas, Clerk of the United States House of Representatives. February 28, 2013. Retrieved April 7, 2013.
  9. "Pennsylvania 2014 General Election – November 4, 2014 Official Results". Pennsylvania Secretary of State. November 4, 2014. Retrieved March 8, 2021.
  10. "Pennsylvania 2016 General Election – November 8, 2016 Official Results". Pennsylvania Secretary of State. November 8, 2016. Retrieved December 28, 2016.
  11. "2018 General Election: Representative in Congress". Pennsylvania Secretary of State. November 6, 2018. Retrieved November 12, 2018.
  12. "2020 Presidential Election – Representative in Congress". Pennsylvania Department of State. Retrieved November 25, 2020.
  13. "2022 General Election Official Returns - Representative in Congress". Pennsylvania Department of State.

Coordinates: 40°52′53″N76°27′06″W / 40.88139°N 76.45167°W / 40.88139; -76.45167