Boone, North Carolina

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Boone, North Carolina
Town of Boone
Boone NC - King Street.jpg
West King Street
Boone NC logo.png
NCMap-doton-Boone.PNG
Coordinates: 36°12′41″N81°40′7″W / 36.21139°N 81.66861°W / 36.21139; -81.66861 Coordinates: 36°12′41″N81°40′7″W / 36.21139°N 81.66861°W / 36.21139; -81.66861
CountryUnited States
State North Carolina
County Watauga
Incorporated1872
Named for Daniel Boone
Government
  Type Council–manager
  MayorRennie Brantz [1]
Area
[2]
  Total6.33 sq mi (16.39 km2)
  Land6.31 sq mi (16.34 km2)
  Water0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation
3,333 ft (1,015.9 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total17,122
  Estimate 
(2019) [3]
19,667
  Density3,117.79/sq mi (1,203.79/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern (EST))
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP codes
28607-28608
Area code(s) 828
FIPS code 37-07080 [4]
GNIS feature ID1009539 [5]
Website http://www.townofboone.net

Boone is a town in and the county seat of Watauga County, North Carolina, United States. Located in the Blue Ridge Mountains of western North Carolina, Boone is the home of Appalachian State University and the headquarters for the disaster and medical relief organization Samaritan's Purse. The population was 17,122 at the 2010 census.

Contents

The town is named for famous American pioneer and explorer Daniel Boone, and every summer, other than 2020, from 1952 has hosted an outdoor amphitheatre drama, Horn in the West , portraying the British settlement of the area during the American Revolutionary War and featuring the contributions of its namesake. It is the largest community and the economic hub of the seven-county region of Western North Carolina known as the High Country.

History

Boone as seen from Howard Knob Boone NC - aerial.jpg
Boone as seen from Howard Knob

Boone took its name from the famous pioneer and explorer Daniel Boone, who on several occasions camped at a site generally agreed to be within the present city limits. Daniel's nephews, Jesse and Jonathan (sons of brother Israel Boone), were members of the town's first church, [6] Three Forks Baptist, still in existence today. [7]

Boone was served by the narrow gauge East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad (nicknamed "Tweetsie") until the flood of 1940. The flood washed away much of the tracks and it was decided not to replace them.

Boone is the home of Appalachian State University, a constituent member of the University of North Carolina. Appalachian State is the sixth-largest university in the seventeen-campus system. Caldwell Community College & Technical Institute also operates a satellite campus in Boone.

"Horn in the West" is a dramatization of the life and times of the early settlers of the mountain area. [8] It features Daniel Boone as one of its characters, and has been performed in an outdoor amphitheater near the town every summer since 1952, except for when COVID-19 necessitated canceling the 2020 performances. [9] The original actor in the role of "Daniel Boone" was Ned Austin. [10] His "Hollywood Star" stands on a pedestal on King Street in downtown Boone. He was followed in the role by Glenn Causey, who portrayed the rugged frontiersman for 41 years, and whose image is still seen in many of the depictions of Boone featured in the area today.[ citation needed ]

Boone is notable for being home to the Junaluska community. Located in the hills just north of Downtown Boone, a free black community has existed in the area since before the Civil War. Although integration in the mid-20th century led to many of the businesses in the neighborhood closing in favor of their downtown counterparts, descendants of the original inhabitants still live in the neighborhood. Junaluska is also home to one of the few majority-African American Mennonite Brethren congregations. [11]

Boone is a center for bluegrass musicians and Appalachian storytellers. Notable artists associated with Boone include the late Grammy Award-winning bluegrass guitar player Doc Watson, and the late guitarist Michael Houser, one of the founding members of and the lead guitarist for the band Widespread Panic, as well as Old Crow Medicine Show, The Blue Rags, and Eric Church, all who are Boone natives.

The Blair Farm, Daniel Boone Hotel, Jones House, John Smith Miller House, and US Post Office-Boone are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. [12]

Geography and climate

Boone is located at 36°12′41″N81°40′7″W / 36.21139°N 81.66861°W / 36.21139; -81.66861 (36.211364, −81.668657) [13] and has an elevation of 3,333 feet (1015.9 m) above sea level. An earlier survey gave the elevation as 3,332 ft and since then it has been published as having an elevation of 3,333 ft (1,016 m). Boone has the highest elevation of any town of its size (over 10,000 population) east of the Mississippi River. As such, Boone features, depending on the isotherm used, a humid continental climate (Köppen Dfb), a rarity for the Southeastern United States, bordering on a subtropical highland climate (Cfb) and straddles the boundary between USDA Plant Hardiness Zones 6B and 7A; [14] the elevation also results in enhanced precipitation, with 52.7 inches (1,340 mm) of average annual precipitation. Compared to the lower elevations of the Carolinas, winters are long and cold, with frequent sleet and snowfall. The daily average temperature in January is 31.2 °F (−0.4 °C), [15] which gives Boone a winter climate more similar to coastal southern New England rather than the Southeast, where a humid subtropical climate predominates. Blizzard-like conditions are not unusual during many winters. Summers are warm, but far cooler and less humid than lower regions to the south and east, with a July daily average temperature of 68.5 °F (20.3 °C). [15] Boone typically receives on average nearly 35 inches (89 cm) of snowfall annually, far higher than the lowland areas in the rest of North Carolina. On January 18, 1966, the temperature fell to −18 °F (−28 °C). [16]

Climate data for Boone, 1991–2020 normals, extremes 1980–present
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)70
(21)
72
(22)
81
(27)
85
(29)
85
(29)
91
(33)
93
(34)
91
(33)
86
(30)
84
(29)
76
(24)
72
(22)
93
(34)
Mean maximum °F (°C)60
(16)
63
(17)
70
(21)
77
(25)
80
(27)
84
(29)
86
(30)
84
(29)
81
(27)
76
(24)
68
(20)
62
(17)
87
(31)
Average high °F (°C)41.4
(5.2)
44.7
(7.1)
51.7
(10.9)
61.7
(16.5)
69.4
(20.8)
75.8
(24.3)
79.0
(26.1)
77.8
(25.4)
72.2
(22.3)
63.0
(17.2)
53.0
(11.7)
45.0
(7.2)
61.2
(16.2)
Daily mean °F (°C)31.5
(−0.3)
34.2
(1.2)
40.5
(4.7)
49.3
(9.6)
57.6
(14.2)
64.7
(18.2)
68.4
(20.2)
67.1
(19.5)
61.3
(16.3)
51.2
(10.7)
41.3
(5.2)
34.9
(1.6)
50.2
(10.1)
Average low °F (°C)21.6
(−5.8)
23.8
(−4.6)
29.2
(−1.6)
36.9
(2.7)
45.8
(7.7)
53.7
(12.1)
57.7
(14.3)
56.3
(13.5)
50.3
(10.2)
39.3
(4.1)
29.6
(−1.3)
24.7
(−4.1)
39.1
(3.9)
Mean minimum °F (°C)4
(−16)
9
(−13)
14
(−10)
24
(−4)
33
(1)
44
(7)
50
(10)
49
(9)
38
(3)
26
(−3)
18
(−8)
10
(−12)
2
(−17)
Record low °F (°C)−24
(−31)
−8
(−22)
−6
(−21)
14
(−10)
26
(−3)
36
(2)
40
(4)
38
(3)
30
(−1)
18
(−8)
10
(−12)
−11
(−24)
−24
(−31)
Average precipitation inches (mm)4.39
(112)
3.64
(92)
4.77
(121)
5.52
(140)
5.46
(139)
5.59
(142)
5.11
(130)
5.56
(141)
5.73
(146)
4.69
(119)
4.44
(113)
4.23
(107)
59.13
(1,502)
Average snowfall inches (cm)6.6
(17)
6.7
(17)
4.8
(12)
1.0
(2.5)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.3
(0.76)
1.0
(2.5)
5.2
(13)
25.6
(65)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in)11.711.512.312.914.014.314.113.310.99.89.211.9145.9
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in)3.73.82.50.70.00.00.00.00.00.20.72.614.6
Source: NOAA [15] [17]
Climate data for Boone, extremes 1920-1980
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)78
(26)
75
(24)
80
(27)
89
(32)
86
(30)
94
(34)
96
(36)
91
(33)
92
(33)
87
(31)
80
(27)
73
(23)
96
(36)
Mean maximum °F (°C)61.1
(16.2)
62.8
(17.1)
70.0
(21.1)
77.6
(25.3)
80.8
(27.1)
84.8
(29.3)
85.9
(29.9)
84.6
(29.2)
82.3
(27.9)
75.7
(24.3)
69.4
(20.8)
61.4
(16.3)
87.8
(31.0)
Mean minimum °F (°C)3.3
(−15.9)
5.7
(−14.6)
12.9
(−10.6)
23.4
(−4.8)
32.8
(0.4)
41.2
(5.1)
48.1
(8.9)
45.5
(7.5)
36.2
(2.3)
24.2
(−4.3)
13.1
(−10.5)
5.5
(−14.7)
−2.5
(−19.2)
Record low °F (°C)−18
(−28)
−8
(−22)
−1
(−18)
13
(−11)
24
(−4)
33
(1)
38
(3)
33
(1)
25
(−4)
14
(−10)
−6
(−21)
−10
(−23)
−18
(−28)
Source: WRCC [16]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 167
1890 144−13.8%
1900 1557.6%
1910 17915.5%
1920 374108.9%
1930 1,295246.3%
1940 1,78838.1%
1950 2,97366.3%
1960 3,68624.0%
1970 8,754137.5%
1980 10,19116.4%
1990 12,91526.7%
2000 13,4724.3%
2010 17,12227.1%
2019 (est.)19,667 [3] 14.9%
U.S. Decennial Census [18]

As of the census [4] of 2000, there were 13,472 people, 4,374 households, and 1,237 families residing in the town. The population density was 2,307.0 people per square mile (890.7/km2). There were 4,748 housing units at an average density of 813.0 per square mile (313.9/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 93.98% White, 3.42% Black or African American, 0.30% Native American, 1.19% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.46% from other races, and 0.60% from two or more races. 1.64% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. [4]

There were 4,374 households, out of which 9.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 21.0% were married couples living together, 5.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 71.7% were non-families. 38.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.97 and the average family size was 2.63. [4]

In the town, the population was spread out, with 5.8% under 18, 65.9% from 18 to 24, 12.1% from 25 to 44, 9.1% from 45 to 64, and 7.1% who were 65 or older. The median age was 21 years. For every 100 females, there are 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.7 males. [4]

The median income for a household in the town was $20,541, and the median income for a family was $49,762. The per capita income was $12,256. Males had a median income of $28,060 versus $20,000 for females. About 9.2% of families and 37.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under the age of 18 and 9.1% of those 65 and older. [4]

Media

Newspaper

Boone is mainly served by three local newspapers:

A smaller newspaper, The Appalachian, is Appalachian State University's campus newspaper; it is published once a week on Thursdays. [20] In addition to the locally printed papers, a monthly entertainment pamphlet named Kraut Creek Revival has limited circulation and is funded by a Denver, NC-based newspaper.

Radio

Law and government

Boone operates under a mayor–council government. The city council consists of five members. The mayor presides over the council and casts a vote on issues only in the event of a tie. As of February 2021, the Town Council members were: Mayor Rennie Brantz, and Councilors: Connie Ulmer (Mayor Pro-Tem), Dustin Hicks, Sam Furgiuele, Virginia Roseman and Nancy LaPlaca. [22]

Development

Industrial, commercial, and residential development in the town of Boone is a controversial issue due to its location in the mountains of Appalachia. On October 16, 2009, the town council accepted the "Boone 2030 Land Use Plan." [23] While the document itself is not in any way actual law, it is used by the town council, board of adjustment, and other committees to guide decision making as to what types of development are appropriate. [24]

In 2009, the North Carolina Department of Transportation began widening 1.1 miles of U.S. 421 (King Street) to a 4-to-6-lane divided highway with a raised concrete median from U.S. 321 (Hardin Street) to east of N.C. 194 (Jefferson Road), including a new entrance and exit to the new Watauga High School, at a cost of $16.2 million. [25] The widening has displaced 25 businesses and 63 residences east of historic downtown King Street. [26] The project was slated to be completed by December 31, 2011, but construction continued into the spring of 2012.

Points of interest

Notable residents

Doc Watson sculpture in downtown Boone DocW Sculpture Boone.jpg
Doc Watson sculpture in downtown Boone

Sister city

Boone has one sister city, as designated by Sister Cities International:

Related Research Articles

Watauga County, North Carolina U.S. county in North Carolina

Watauga County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 51,079. Its county seat and largest town is Boone. The county is in an exceptionally mountainous region. It is the home of Appalachian State University, which has approximately 20,023 students as of August 20, 2020.

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Appalachian State University

Appalachian State University is a public university in Boone, North Carolina. It was founded as a teachers college in 1899 by brothers B.B. and D.D. Dougherty and D.D.’s wife, Lillie Shull Dougherty. The university expanded to include other programs in 1967 and joined the University of North Carolina System in 1971.

Watauga River river in the United States of America

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Pisgah National Forest National forest in North Carolina

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WATA Radio station in Boone, North Carolina

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Western North Carolina

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Sycamore Shoals United States historic place

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Eaglenest Mountain

Eaglenest Mountain is a mountain located 2 miles south of Maggie Valley, North Carolina in Haywood County. It is part of the Plott Balsams, a range of the Appalachian Mountains, and less than a mile south of North Eaglenest Mountain, a higher mountain which used to be called Mount Junaluska and is the highest mountain overlooking Lake Junaluska from the southwest. The closest town that is accessible by road is Hazelwood. Hazelwood was absorbed into the larger incorporated Town of Waynesville in 1995.

Howard Knob

Howard Knob is a mountain in the North Carolina High Country, located in the town of Boone. According to the US Geological Survey, the mountain's proper name is Howard Knob, but it is known to locals and tourists as Howard's Knob. Howard Knob and the surrounding area are part of the Appalachian Mountain Range. The mountain has an elevation of 4,396 feet (1,340 m) above sea level, and rises nearly 1,000 feet (300 m) above the town of Boone and the campus of Appalachian State University.

The High Country Grizzlies were a professional indoor football team that began play in the 2017 season. Based in Boone, North Carolina, the Grizzlies played their home games at the George M. Holmes Convocation Center on the campus of Appalachian State University.

The Northern Peaks State Trail is a unit of the North Carolina state park system in Ashe and Watauga Counties, North Carolina in the United States. The State Trail is planned as a hiking trail connecting Downtown Boone, Howard Knob County Park, Elk Knob State Park, Three Top Mountain Gameland, Downtown West Jefferson and Mount Jefferson State Natural Area. The trail is a collaboration between local governments and the state, with development coordinated by the North Carolina Division of Parks and Recreation (NCDPR).

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