Kentucky's 1st congressional district

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Kentucky's 1st congressional district
Kentucky's 1st congressional district
Kentucky's 1st congressional district
Kentucky's 1st congressional district
Kentucky's 1st congressional district
District boundaries
Representative
  James Comer
RTompkinsville
Distribution
  • 63.12% rural [1]
  • 36.88% urban
Population (2019)717,704 [2]
Median household
income
$46,999 [3]
Ethnicity
Cook PVI R+26 [4]
Sign in front of the McCracken, Kentucky Courthouse (in Paducah, Kentucky) commemorating early members of the U.S. House of Representatives representing Jackson Purchase (U.S. historical region). The "First District" in the title actually changed over time. It refers to the Jackson Purchase, which was in the 5th district from 1819 to 1823, the 12th district until 1833, and then the 1st district until the end of the sign's lineage in 1855. Alney-McLean---Paducah-sign-for-Wiki.jpg
Sign in front of the McCracken, Kentucky Courthouse (in Paducah, Kentucky) commemorating early members of the U.S. House of Representatives representing Jackson Purchase (U.S. historical region). The "First District" in the title actually changed over time. It refers to the Jackson Purchase, which was in the 5th district from 1819 to 1823, the 12th district until 1833, and then the 1st district until the end of the sign's lineage in 1855.

Kentucky's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Kentucky. Located in Western Kentucky, the district takes in Henderson, Hopkinsville, Madisonville, Paducah and Murray. The district is represented by Republican James Comer who won a special election to fill the seat of Rep. Ed Whitfield who resigned in September 2016. Comer also won election to the regular term to begin January 3, 2017.

Contents

Characteristics

Voter registration and party enrollment as of 27 April 2022 [5]
PartyNumber of votersPercentage
Democratic 274,76845.52%
Republican 267,33545.26%
Other30,7575.21%
Independent17,7563.01%
Total590,616100%

Until January 1, 2006, Kentucky did not track party affiliation for registered voters who were neither Democratic nor Republican. [6] The Kentucky voter registration card does not explicitly list anything other than Democratic Party, Republican Party, or Other, with the "Other" option having a blank line and no instructions on how to register as something else. [7]

Kentucky counties within the 1st Congressional District: Adair, Allen, Ballard, Caldwell, Calloway, Carlisle, Casey, Christian, Clinton, Crittenden, Cumberland, Fulton, Graves, Henderson, Hickman, Hopkins, Livingston, Logan, Lyon, Marshall, Marion, McCracken, McLean, Metcalfe, Monroe, Muhlenberg, Ohio, Russell, Simpson, Taylor, Todd, Trigg, Union, Washington, and Webster.

Recent presidential elections

Election results from presidential races
YearOfficeResults
2000 President Bush 58 - 40%
2004 President Bush 63 - 36%
2008 President McCain 62 - 37%
2012 President Romney 66 - 32%
2016 President Trump 72 - 24%
2019 Governor Bevin 59.3 - 38.7%
2020 President Trump 73 - 25%

List of members representing the district

MemberPartyServiceCong
ress
Electoral historyLocation
Christopher Greenup.jpg
Christopher Greenup
Anti-Administration November 9, 1792 –
March 3, 1795
2nd
3rd
4th
Elected September 7, 1792.
Re-elected in 1793.
Re-elected in 1795.
Retired.
1792 – 1803
"Southern district": Jefferson, Lincoln, Madison, Mercer, Nelson, Shelby, and Washington counties
Added in 1797: Green, Hardin, and Logan counties
Added in 1799: Barren, Bullitt, Christian, Cumberland, Garrard, Henderson, Henry, Livingston, Muhlenberg, Ohio, Pulaski, and Warren counties
Added in 1801: Breckinridge, Knox, and Wayne counties
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1797
Thomas T. Davis Democratic-Republican March 4, 1797 –
March 3, 1803
5th
6th
7th
Elected in 1797.
Re-elected in 1799.
Re-elected in 1801.
Retired.
Matthew Lyon (Vermont Congressman) 2.jpg
Matthew Lyon
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1811
8th
9th
10th
11th
Elected in 1803.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Lost re-election.
1803 – 1813
Adair, Barren, Christian, Cumberland, Henderson, Livingston, Logan, Muhlenberg, Ohio, Pulaski, Warren, and Wayne counties
Anthony New Democratic-Republican March 4, 1811 –
March 3, 1813
12th Elected in 1810.
Redistricted to the 5th district and retired.
JClark.jpg
James Clark
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1813 –
August 1816
13th
14th
Elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
Leave of absence April 8, 1816.
Resigned prior to August 1816.
1813 – 1823
Bath, Clark, Estill, Fleming, Floyd, Greenup, and Montgomery counties
VacantAugust 1816 –
December 2, 1816
14th
Thomas Fletcher Democratic-Republican December 2, 1816 –
March 3, 1817
Elected to finish Clark's term.
Retired.
David Trimble Democratic-Republican [lower-alpha 1] March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1825
15th
16th
17th
18th
19th
Elected in 1816.
Re-elected in 1818.
Re-elected in 1820.
Re-elected in 1822.
Re-elected in 1824.
Lost re-election.
1823 – 1833
Bath, Fleming, Floyd, Greenup, Lawrence, Lewis, Montgomery, and Pike counties
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
Henry Daniel Jacksonian March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1833
20th
21st
22nd
Elected in 1827.
Re-elected in 1829.
Re-elected in 1831.
Lost re-election.
Chittenden Lyon Jacksonian March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1835
23rd Redistricted from the 12th district and re-elected in 1833.
Retired.
1833 – 1843
[ data unknown/missing ]
LinnBoyd.jpg
Linn Boyd
Jacksonian March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
24th Elected in 1835.
Lost re-election.
John L. Murray Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
25th Elected in 1837.
Retired.
LinnBoyd.jpg
Linn Boyd
Democratic March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1855
26th
27th
28th
29th
30th
31st
32nd
33rd
Elected in 1839.
Re-elected in 1841.
Re-elected in 1843.
Re-elected in 1845.
Re-elected in 1847.
Re-elected in 1849.
Re-elected in 1851.
Re-elected in 1853.
Retired.
1843 – 1853
[ data unknown/missing ]
1853 – 1863
[ data unknown/missing ]
Henry Cornelius Burnett - Brady-Handy (cropped).jpg
Henry C. Burnett
Democratic March 4, 1855 –
December 3, 1861
34th
35th
36th
37th
Elected in 1855.
Re-elected in 1857.
Re-elected in 1859.
Re-elected in 1861.
Expelled due to collaborating with the Confederacy.
VacantDecember 3, 1861 –
March 10, 1862
37th
Samuel L. Casey Unionist March 10, 1862 –
March 3, 1863
Elected to finish Burnett's term.
Retired.
Lucien Anderson (Kentucky Congressman).jpg
Lucien Anderson
Unconditional Unionist March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1865
38th Elected in 1863.
Retired.
1863 – 1873
[ data unknown/missing ]
LawrenceSTrimble.jpg
Lawrence S. Trimble
Democratic March 4, 1865 –
March 3, 1871
39th
40th
41st
Elected in 1865.
Re-elected in 1867.
Re-elected in 1868.
Lost renomination.
Edward Crossland (Kentucky Congressman).jpg
Edward Crossland
Democratic March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1875
42nd
43rd
Elected in 1870.
Re-elected in 1872.
Retired.
1873 – 1883
[ data unknown/missing ]
AndrewBoone.jpg
Andrew Boone
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879
44th
45th
Elected in 1874.
Re-elected in 1876.
Retired.
Oscar Turner cropped.jpg
Oscar Turner
Independent Democratic March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1881
46th
47th
48th
Elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Re-elected in 1882.
Retired.
Democratic March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1883
Independent Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1885
1883 – 1893
[ data unknown/missing ]
William-J.-Stone.jpg
William J. Stone
Democratic March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1895
49th
50th
51st
52nd
53rd
Elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886.
Re-elected in 1888.
Re-elected in 1890.
Re-elected in 1892.
Retired.
1893 – 1903
[ data unknown/missing ]
John-Hendrick.jpg
John K. Hendrick
Democratic March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1897
54th Elected in 1894.
Lost renomination.
Charles-K.-Wheeler-1899.jpg
Charles K. Wheeler
Democratic March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1903
55th
56th
57th
Elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Retired.
Ollie Murray James, senator from Kentucky.jpg
Ollie M. James
Democratic March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1913
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
Elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
1903–1913
[ data unknown/missing ]
Alben Barkley, photo portrait upper body, 1913.jpg
Alben W. Barkley
Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1927
63rd
64th
65th
66th
67th
68th
69th
Elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
1913 – 1923
[ data unknown/missing ]
1923 – 1933
[ data unknown/missing ]
William Voris Gregory (Kentucky Congressman).jpg
William V. Gregory
Democratic March 4, 1927 –
March 3, 1933
70th
71st
72nd
Elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Redistricted to the at-large district .
District not in useMarch 4, 1933 –
March 3, 1935
73rd
William Voris Gregory (Kentucky Congressman).jpg
William V. Gregory
Democratic March 4, 1935 –
October 10, 1936
74th Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1934.
Died.
1933 – 1943
[ data unknown/missing ]
VacantOctober 10, 1936 –
January 3, 1937
Noble J. Gregory (Kentucky Congressman).jpg
Noble J. Gregory
Democratic January 3, 1937 –
January 3, 1959
75th
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
Elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Lost renomination.
1943 – 1953
[ data unknown/missing ]
1953 – 1963
[ data unknown/missing ]
Frank Stubblefield.jpg
Frank Stubblefield
Democratic January 3, 1959 –
December 31, 1974
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
Elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Lost renomination and resigned early.
1963 – 1973
[ data unknown/missing ]
1973 – 1983
[ data unknown/missing ]
VacantDecember 31, 1974 –
January 3, 1975
93rd
Carroll Hubbard.png
Carroll Hubbard
Democratic January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1993
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
Elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Lost renomination.
1983 – 1993
[ data unknown/missing ]
Thomas J. Barlow.jpg
Tom Barlow
Democratic January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 1995
103rd Elected in 1992.
Lost re-election.
1993 – 2003
[ data unknown/missing ]
Edwhitfield.jpg
Ed Whitfield
Republican January 3, 1995 –
September 6, 2016
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
Elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Retired and resigned early.
2003 – 2013
United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 1 map.png
2013 – Present
Kentucky US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
Adair, Allen, Ballard, Caldwell, Calloway, Carlisle, Casey, Christian, Clinton, Crittenden, Cumberland, Fulton,
Graves, Henderson, Hickman, Hopkins, Livingston, Logan, Lyon, Marshall, Marion, McCracken, McLean,
Metcalfe, Monroe, Muhlenberg, Ohio, Russell, Simpson, Taylor, Todd, Trigg, Union, and Webster counties
VacantSeptember 6, 2016 –
November 8, 2016
114th
James Comer 116th Congress.jpg
James Comer
Republican November 8, 2016 –
Present
114th
115th
116th
117th
Elected to finish Whitfield's term.
Also elected in 2016 to the next term.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.

Recent election results

2000

Kentucky's 1st Congressional District Election (2000)
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Ed Whitfield* 132,115 58.00
Democratic Brian Roy95,80642.000
Total votes227,921 100.00
Republican hold

2002

Kentucky's 1st Congressional District Election (2002)
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Ed Whitfield* 117,600 65.26
Democratic Klint Alexander62,61734.74
Total votes180,217 100.00
Republican hold

2004

Kentucky's 1st Congressional District Election (2004)
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Ed Whitfield* 175,972 67.37
Democratic Billy Cartwright85,22932.63
Total votes261,201 100.00
Republican hold

2006

Kentucky's 1st Congressional District Election (2006)
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Ed Whitfield* 123,618 59.58
Democratic Tom Barlow83,86540.42
Total votes207,483 100.00
Republican hold

2008

Kentucky's 1st Congressional District Election (2008)
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Ed Whitfield* 178,107 64.35
Democratic Heather Ryan98,67435.65
Total votes276,781 100.00
Turnout  
Republican hold

2010

Kentucky's 1st Congressional District Election (2010)
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Ed Whitfield* 153,519 71.25
Democratic Charles K. Hatchett61,69028.75
Total votes215,209 100.00
Republican hold

2012

Kentucky's 1st Congressional District Election (2012)
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Ed Whitfield* 199,956 69.63
Democratic Charles K. Hatchett87,19930.37
Total votes287,155 100.00
Republican hold

2014

2014 United States House of Representatives elections in Kentucky
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Ed Whitfield (incumbent) 173,022 73.1
Democratic Charles Kendall Hatchett63,59626.9
Total votes236,618 100.0
Republican hold

2016

2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Kentucky
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican James Comer 216,959 72.6
Democratic Sam Gaskins81,71027.3
Independent Terry McIntosh (write-in)3320.1
Total votes299,001 100.0
Republican hold

2018

2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Kentucky
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican James Comer (incumbent) 172,167 68.6
Democratic Paul Walker78,84931.4
Total votes251,016 100.0
Republican hold

2020

2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Kentucky
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican James Comer (incumbent) 246,329 75.0
Democratic James Rhodes82,14125.0
Total votes328,470 100.0
Republican hold

See also

Notes

  1. Supported the Adams-Clay faction in the 1824 United States presidential election

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References

  1. Geography, US Census Bureau. "Congressional Districts Relationship Files (state-based)". www.census.gov. Archived from the original on July 17, 2017. Retrieved February 11, 2018.
  2. Bureau, Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP), US Census. "My Congressional District". www.census.gov.
  3. Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP), US Census Bureau. "My Congressional District". www.census.gov.
  4. "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  5. "Registration Statistics". Kentucky State Board of Elections. January 2022.
  6. "Kentucky Administrative Regulations 31KAR4:150". Kentucky Legislative Research Commission. November 2005. Retrieved February 6, 2014.
  7. "Register To Vote". Kentucky State Board of Elections. August 2003. Retrieved February 6, 2014.

Coordinates: 37°05′05″N87°11′06″W / 37.08472°N 87.18500°W / 37.08472; -87.18500