United States women's national soccer team

Last updated

United States
United States women's national soccer team logo.svg
Nickname(s) US Women's team
The Stars and Stripes
Association United States Soccer Federation
Confederation CONCACAF
(North, Central America, and the Caribbean)
Sub-confederation NAFU (North America)
Head coach Jill Ellis
Captain Carli Lloyd
Alex Morgan
Megan Rapinoe [1]
Becky Sauerbrunn
Most caps Kristine Lilly (354)
Top scorer Abby Wambach (184)
FIFA code USA
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First colors
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Second colors
FIFA ranking
Current 1 Steady2.svg(July 12, 2019) [2]
Highest1 (various times)
Lowest2 (various times)
First international
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 1–0 United States  Flag of the United States (Pantone).svg
(Jesolo, Italy; August 18, 1985)
Biggest win
Flag of the United States (Pantone).svg  United States 14–0 Dominican Rep.  Flag of the Dominican Republic.svg
(Vancouver, Canada; January 20, 2012)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 4–0 United States  Flag of the United States (Pantone).svg
(Hangzhou, China; September 27, 2007)
World Cup
Appearances8 (first in 1991 )
Best resultChampions: 1991, 1999, 2015, 2019
Olympic Games
Appearances6 (first in 1996 )
Best resultGold medal.svgGold: 1996, 2004, 2008, 2012
CONCACAF Championship
& Gold Cup
Appearances9 (first in 1991 )
Best resultChampions: 1991, 1993, 1994, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2014, 2018

The United States women's national soccer team (USWNT) represents the United States in international women's soccer. The team is the most successful in international women's soccer, winning four Women's World Cup titles (including the first Women's World Cup in 1991), four Olympic gold medals (including the first Olympic women's soccer tournament in 1996) and eight CONCACAF Gold Cups. It medaled in every World Cup and Olympic tournament in women's soccer history from 1991 to 2015, before being knocked out in the quarterfinal of the 2016 Summer Olympics. The team is governed by United States Soccer Federation and competes in CONCACAF (the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football).

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of more than 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the most populous city is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

FIFA Womens World Cup Association football competition for womens national teams

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China. The tournament's current format, national teams vie for 23 slots in a three-year qualification phase. The host nation's team is automatically entered as the 24th slot. The tournament proper, alternatively called the World Cup Finals, is contested at venues within the host nation(s) over a period of about one month.

1991 FIFA Womens World Cup 1991 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup was the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It took place in Guangdong, China from 16 to 30 November 1991. FIFA, football's international governing body selected China as host nation as Guangdong had hosted a prototype world championship three years earlier, the 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament. Matches were played in the state capital, Guangzhou, as well as in Foshan, Jiangmen and Zhongshan. The competition was sponsored by Mars, Incorporated. With FIFA still reluctant to bestow their "World Cup" brand, the tournament was officially known as the 1st FIFA World Championship for Women's Football for the M&M's Cup.

Contents

After being ranked No. 2 on average from 2003 to 2008 in the FIFA Women's World Rankings, [3] the team was ranked No. 1 continuously from March 2008 to November 2014, [4] falling back behind Germany, the only other team to occupy the No. 1 position in the ranking's history. The team dropped to 2nd on March 24, 2017, due to its last-place finish in the 2017 SheBelieves Cup, then returned to 1st on June 23, 2017, after victories in friendlies against Russia, Sweden, and Norway. [5] The team was selected as the U.S. Olympic Committee's Team of the Year in 1997 and 1999, [6] and Sports Illustrated chose the entire team as 1999 Sportswomen of the Year for its usual Sportsman of the Year honor. [7] On April 5, 2017, U.S. Women's Soccer and U.S. Soccer reached a deal on a new collective bargaining agreement that would, among other things, lead to a pay increase. [8] ,

The FIFA Women's World Rankings for football were introduced in 2003, with the first rankings published in March of that year, as a follow-on to the existing Men's FIFA World Rankings. They attempt to compare the strength of internationally active women's national teams at any given time.

Germany womens national football team womens national association football team representing Germany

The Germany women's national football team is governed by the German Football Association (DFB).

The 2017 SheBelieves Cup was the second edition of the SheBelieves Cup, an invitational women's football tournament held in the United States. It took place between March 1 and 7, 2017.

History

Origins in the 1980s

The passing of Title IX in 1972, which outlawed gender-based discrimination for federally-funded education programs, spurred the creation of college soccer teams across the United States at a time when women's soccer was rising in popularity internationally. [9] The U.S. Soccer Federation tasked coach Mike Ryan to select a roster of college players to participate in the 1985 Mundialito tournament in Italy, its first foray into women's international soccer. [10] The team played its first match on August 18, 1985, losing 1–0 to Italy, and finished the tournament in fourth place after failing to win its remaining matches against Denmark and England. [11] [12]

Title IX United States federal law prohibiting sex discrimination in federally-funded education programs

Title IX is a federal civil rights law in the United States of America that was passed as part of the Education Amendments of 1972. This is Public Law No. 92‑318, 86 Stat. 235, codified at 20 U.S.C. §§ 1681–1688. It was co-authored and introduced by Senator Birch Bayh in the U.S. Senate, and Congresswoman Patsy Mink in the House. It was later renamed the Patsy T. Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act following Mink's death in 2002. The following is the original text as written and signed into law by President Richard Nixon in 1972:

Mike Ryan was an Irish soccer coach from Dublin. He was the coach of the 1985 United States women's national soccer team for its first international games in Italy in August 1985. He finished his career by coaching at Nathan Hale High School before retiring in 2012 after having coached for over 60 years.

The Mundialito was a global invitational tournament for national teams in women's association football. Held on four occasions in the northern region of Italy since 1984, it was one of the most prestigious women's football events, prior to the advent of the Women's World Cup and Women's Olympic Football.

University of North Carolina coach Anson Dorrance was hired as the team's first full-time manager in 1986 with the goal of fielding a competitive women's team at the next Mundialito and at future tournaments. [12] In their first Mundialito under Dorrance, the United States defeated China, Brazil, and Japan before finishing as runners-up to Italy. [13] Dorrance gave national team appearances to teenage players, including future stars Mia Hamm, Julie Foudy, and Kristine Lilly, instead of the college players preferred by the federation. [14] The United States played in the 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament in China, a FIFA-sanctioned competition to test the feasibility of a regular women's championship, and lost in the quarterfinals to eventual champions Norway. [12]

North Carolina Tar Heels womens soccer

The North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer team represent the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the Atlantic Coast Conference of NCAA Division I soccer. The team has won 20 of the 27 Atlantic Coast Conference championships, and 22 of the 36 NCAA national championships.

Anson Dorrance American soccer player-coach

Albert Anson Dorrance IV is an American soccer coach. He is currently the head coach of the women's soccer program at the University of North Carolina. He has one of the most successful coaching records in the history of athletics. Under Dorrance's leadership, the Tar Heels have won 21 of the 31 NCAA Women's Soccer Championships. The Tar Heels' record under Dorrance stood at 809-67-36 over 33 seasons at the end of the 2017 season. He has led his team to a 101-game unbeaten streak and coached 13 different women to a total of 20 National Player of the Year awards. The NCAA has recognized Dorrance as the Women's Soccer Coach of the Year seven times and as the Men's Soccer Coach of the Year in 1987. On March 10, 2008 Dorrance was elected to the National Soccer Hall of Fame.

China womens national football team Womens national association football team representing the Peoples Republic of China

The China women's national football team, recognized as China PR by FIFA, is governed by the Chinese Football Association. The team is colloquially referred to as "Zhōngguó Nǚzú".

1990s

Following the 1988 tournament, FIFA announced plans for a new women's tournament, named the 1st FIFA World Championship for Women's Football for the M&M's Cup until it was retroactively given the "World Cup" name. The United States qualified for the tournament by winning the inaugural CONCACAF Women's Championship, hosted by Haiti in April 1991, outscoring their opponents 49–0 for the sole CONCACAF berth in the tournament. [12] [15] The team played several exhibition matches abroad against European opponents to prepare for the world championship, while its players quit their regular jobs to train full-time with meager compensation. [16] [17] Dorrance utilized a 4–3–3 formation that was spearheaded by the "Triple-Edged Sword" of forward Michelle Akers-Stahl and wingers Carin Jennings and April Heinrichs. [18]

The 1991 CONCACAF Women's Championship was the first staging of the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup, the international women's association football tournament for North American, Central American and Caribbean nations organized by CONCACAF. The tournament took place in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, between 18 and 27 April 1991 and consisted of eight national teams. The matches were 80 minutes long.

CONCACAF International sport governing body

The Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football is one of FIFA's 6 continental governing bodies for association football. Its 41 members include nations and territories in North America, including Central America and the Caribbean. Three geographically South American entities are also members — Guyana, Suriname, and the French overseas department of French Guiana and Martinique. CONCACAF's primary functions are to organize competitions for national teams and clubs, and to conduct World Cup and Women's World Cup qualifying tournaments.

The Triple-Edged Sword was the forward line of the victorious United States women's national soccer team at the 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup. The line-up in coach Anson Dorrance's 4–3–3 formation consisted of center forward Michelle Akers and wingers Carin Jennings-Gabarra and April Heinrichs.

At the Women's World Cup, the United States won all three of its group stage matches and outscored its opponents 11–2. In the opening match against Sweden, the U.S. took a 3–0 lead early in the second half, but conceded two goals to end the match with a narrower 3–2 victory. The U.S. proceeded to win 5–0 in its second match against Brazil and 3–0 in its third match against Japan in the following days, clinching first place in the group and a quarterfinal berth. [19] The United States proceeded with a 7–0 victory in the quarterfinals over Chinese Taipei, fueled by a five-goal performance by Akers-Stahl in the first fifty minutes of the match. [19]

Sweden womens national football team womens national association football team representing Sweden

The Sweden women's national football team represents Sweden in international women's football competition and is controlled by the Swedish Football Association. The national team has won the European Competition for Women's Football in 1984, one World Cup-silver (2003), as well as three European Championship-silvers. The team has participated in six Olympic Games, eight World Cups, as well as ten European Championships. Sweden won bronze medals at the World Cups in 1991, 2011 and 2019.

Chinese Taipei womens national football team womens national association football team representing Taiwan

The Chinese Taipei women's national football team is the international women's football team for Taiwan.

In the semifinals against Germany, Carin Jennings scored a hat-trick in the first half as the team clinched a place in the final with a 5–2 victory. [20] The team's lopsided victories in the earlier rounds had brought attention from American media outlets, but the final match was not televised live in the U.S. [19] The United States won the inaugural Women's World Cup title by defeating Norway 2–1 in the final, played in front of 65,000 spectators at Tianhe Stadium in Guangzhou, as Akers-Stahl scored twice to create and restore a lead for the Americans. [21] Akers-Stahl finished as the top goalscorer at the tournament, with ten goals, and Carin Jennings was awarded the Golden Ball as the tournament's best player. [22]

Despite their Women's World Cup victory, the U.S. team remained in relative obscurity and received a small welcome from several U.S. Soccer Federation officials upon arrival at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City. [23] The team were given fewer resources and little attention from the federation as they focused on improving the men's national team in preparation for the 1994 men's World Cup that would be hosted in the United States. [24] The women's team was placed on hiatus after the tournament, only playing twice in 1992, but returned the following year to play in several tournaments hosted in Cyprus, Canada, and the United States, including a second CONCACAF Championship title. The program was still supported better than those of the former Soviet Union, where football was considered a "men's game". [25] [24] [26]

The United States played in several friendly tournaments to prepare for the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup and its qualification campaign. The first was the inaugural staging of the Algarve Cup in Portugal, which saw the team win its two group stage matches but lose 1–0 to Norway in the final. It followed by a victory in the Chiquita Cup, an exhibition tournament hosted in August on the U.S. East Coast against Germany, China, and Norway. [27] [28] Dorrance resigned from his position as head coach in early August and was replaced by his assistant, Tony DiCicco, a former professional goalkeeper who played in the American Soccer League. [24] [29] DiCicco led the United States to a berth in the Women's World Cup by winning the 1994 CONCACAF Championship, where the team scored 36 goals and conceded only one. [27]

In February 1995, the U.S. women's program opened a permanent training and treatment facility in Sanford, Florida, and began a series of warm-up friendlies that were paid for by American company Nike. [30] The team topped their group in the Women's World Cup, despite a 3–3 tie with China in the opening match and losing goalkeeper Brianna Scurry to a red card in their second match. The United States proceeded to beat Japan 4–0 in the quarterfinals, but lost 1–0 to eventual champions Norway in the semifinals. The team finished in third place, winning 2–0 in its consolation match against China.

The team won the gold medal in the inaugural Olympics women's soccer tournament in the 1996 Summer Olympics, hosted in Atlanta before large crowds.[ citation needed ] Julie Foudy, Kristine Lilly, and the rest of the 1999 team started a revolution towards women's team sports in America. An influential victory came in the 1999 World Cup when they defeated China 5–4 in a penalty shoot-out following a 0–0 draw after extended time. [31] With this win they emerged onto the world stage and brought significant media attention to women's soccer and athletics. On July 10, 1999, over 90,000 people (the largest ever for a women's sporting event and one of the largest attendances in the world for a tournament game final) filled the Rose Bowl to watch the United States play China in the Final. After a back and forth game, the score was tied 0–0 at full-time, and remained so after extra time, leading to a penalty kick shootout. With Briana Scurry's save of China's third kick, the score was 4–4 with only Brandi Chastain left to shoot. She scored and won the game for the United States. Chastain dropped to her knees and whipped off her shirt, celebrating in her sports bra, which later made the cover of Sports Illustrated and the front pages of newspapers around the country and world. [32] This win influenced many girls to want to play on a soccer team. [33]

2000s

In the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, the U.S. defeated Norway 1–0 in the quarterfinals, but lost 0–3 to Germany in the semifinals. The team then defeated Canada 3–1 to claim third place. [34] Abby Wambach was the team's top scorer with three goals; Joy Fawcett and Shannon Boxx made the tournament's all-star team.

At the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, the U.S. defeated England 3–0 in the quarterfinals but then suffered its most lopsided loss in team history when it lost to Brazil 0–4 in the semifinals. [35] The U.S. recovered to defeat Norway to take third place. Abby Wambach was the team's leading scorer with 6 goals, and Kristine Lilly was the only American named to the tournament's all-star team.

The team earned gold medals in both the 2004 and 2008 Olympics, but interest in the Women's National Team had diminished since their performance in the '99 World Cup. However, the second women's professional league was created in March of 2009, Women's Professional Soccer.

2010s

In the quarterfinal of the 2011 Women's World Cup in Germany, the U.S. defeated Brazil 5–3 on penalty kicks. Abby Wambach's goal in the 122nd minute to tie the game 2–2 has been voted the greatest goal in U.S. soccer history and the greatest goal in Women's World Cup history. [36] [37] The U.S. then beat France 3–1 in the semifinal, but lost to Japan 3–1 on penalty kicks in the Final after drawing 1–1 in regulation and 2–2 in overtime. Hope Solo was named the tournament's best goalkeeper and Abby Wambach won the silver ball as the tournament's second best player.

In the 2012 Summer Olympics, the U.S. won the gold medal for the fourth time in five Olympics by defeating Japan 2–1 in front of 80,203 fans at Wembley Stadium, a record for a women's soccer game at the Olympics. [38] The United States advanced to face Japan for the gold medal by winning the semifinal against Canada, a 4–3 victory at the end of extra time. [39] The 2012 London Olympics marked the first time the USWNT won every game en route to the gold medal and set an Olympic women's team record of 16 goals scored. [39]

A ticker tape parade in Manhattan celebrating the USWNT's 2015 World Cup victory Womens World Cup parade July 2015.JPG
A ticker tape parade in Manhattan celebrating the USWNT's 2015 World Cup victory

The National Women's Soccer League started in 2013, and provided competitive games as well as opportunities to players on the fringes of the squad. [40] [41] The U.S. had a 43-game unbeaten streak that spanned two years the streak began with a 4–0 win over Sweden in the 2012 Algarve Cup, and came to an end after a 1–0 loss against Sweden in the 2014 Algarve Cup. [42] [43]

The USA defeated Japan 5–2 in the final of the 2015 World Cup, becoming the first team in history to win three Women's World Cup titles. In the 16th minute, Carli Lloyd achieved the fastest hat-trick from kick-off in World Cup history, and Abby Wambach was greeted with a standing ovation for her last World Cup match. [44] Following their 2015 World Cup win, the team was honored with a ticker tape parade in New York City, the first for a women's sports team, and honored by President Barack Obama at the White House. [45] On December 16, 2015, however, a 0–1 loss to China in Wambach's last game meant the team's first home loss since 2004, ending their 104-game home unbeaten streak. [46]

In the 2016 Summer Olympics, the U.S. drew against Sweden in the quarterfinal; in the following penalty kick phase, Sweden won the game 4–3. The loss marked the first time that the USWNT did not advance to the gold medal game of the Olympics, and the first time that the USWNT failed to advance to the semifinal round of a major tournament. [47]

After the defeat in the 2016 Olympics, the USWNT underwent a year of experimentation which saw them losing 3 home games. If not for a comeback win against Brazil, the USWNT was on the brink of losing 4 home games in one year, a low never before seen by the USWNT. 2017 saw the USWNT play 12 games against teams ranked in the top-15 in the world. [48]

Throughout 2018, the U.S. would pick up two major tournament wins, winning both the SheBelieves Cup [49] and the Tournament of Nations. [50] The team would enter qualifying for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup on a 21-game unbeaten streak and dominated the competition, winning all five of its games and the tournament whilst qualifying for the World Cup as well as scoring 18 goals and conceding none. [51] On November 8, 2018, the U.S. earned their 500th victory in team history after a 1–0 victory over Portugal. [52] The start of 2019 saw the U.S. lose an away game to France, 3–1, marking the end of a 28-game unbeaten streak and their first loss since a 1–0 defeat to Australia in July 2017. [53]

The USWNT started off their 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup campaign with a 13–0 victory against Thailand, setting a new Women's World Cup record. Alex Morgan equaled Michelle Akers' record of scoring five goals in a single World Cup match, while four of her teammates scored their first World Cup goals in their debut at the tournament. [54] The U.S. would win its next match against Chile 3–0 [55] before concluding the group stage with a win of 2–0 over Sweden. [56] The team emerged as the winners of Group F and would go on to face Spain in the Round of 16, whom they would defeat 2–1 thanks to a pair of Megan Rapinoe penalties. [57] The team would achieve identical results in their next two games. With 2–1 victories over France [58] and then England [59] seeing them advance to a record third straight World Cup final, they played against the Netherlands for the title. They beat the Netherlands 2-0 in the final on July 7, 2019, becoming the first team in history to win four Women's World Cup titles.

Team image

Media coverage

U.S. TV coverage for the five Women's World Cups from 1995 to 2011 was provided by ESPN/ABC and Univision, [60] [61] while coverage rights for the three Women's World Cups from 2015 to 2023 were awarded to Fox Sports and Telemundo. [62] [63] In May 2014 a deal was signed to split TV coverage of other USWNT games between ESPN, Fox Sports, and Univision through the end of 2022. [64] The USWNT games in the 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship and the 2015 Algarve Cup were broadcast by Fox Sports. [65] [66]

The 1999 World Cup final set the original record for largest US television audience for a women's soccer match with 18 million viewers on average [67] [68] and was the most viewed English-language US broadcast of any soccer match until the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Final between the United States and Japan. [69]

The 2015 Women's World Cup Final between the US and Japan was the most watched soccer match – men's or women's – in American broadcast history. [70] It averaged 23 million viewers and higher ratings than the NBA finals and the Stanley Cup finals. [70] [71] The final was also the most watched US-Spanish language broadcast of a FIFA Women's World Cup match in history.

Overall, there were over 750 million viewers for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, making it the most watched Women's World Cup in history. The FIFA Women's World Cup is now the second most watched FIFA tournament, with only the men's FIFA World Cup attracting more viewership. [72]

Attendance

The 1999 World Cup final, in which the USA defeated China, set a world attendance record for a women's sporting event of 90,185 in a sellout at the Rose Bowl in Southern California. [73] The record for Olympic women's soccer attendance was set by the 2012 Olympic final between the USWNT and Japan, with 80,023 spectators at Wembley Stadium. [74]

Collective bargaining

In recent years, the players of the USWNT have waged an escalating legal fight with the United States Soccer Federation over gender discrimination. Central to their demands is equal pay. The players point to their lower paychecks as compared to the U.S. men’s national team, despite their higher record of success in recent years. [75]

In April 2016, five players filed a wage-discrimination action against the U.S. Soccer Federation with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. [76] The group consisted of Hope Solo, Carli Lloyd, Alex Morgan, Megan Rapinoe, and Becky Sauerbrunn.

One year later, in April 2017, it was announced that a new collective bargaining agreement, or CBA, with U.S soccer had been made. The agreement stated that the players would have an increased base pay and improved match bonuses. These changes could increase their previous pay from $200,000 to $300,000. This 2017 CBA, however, does not guarantee the U.S national women's team equal pay with the men's national team. The CBA's five year term, through 2021, ensured that the next negotiation would not become an issue for the team in its next major competitions. On top of this CBA, U.S Soccer had agreed to pay the players for two years' worth of unequal per-diem payments. [77]

On March 8, 2019, all 28 members of the U.S. team filed a gender discrimination lawsuit against the United States Soccer Federation. [78] The lawsuit, filed in the United States District Court in Los Angeles, accused the Federation of "institutional gender discrimination." [79] The lawsuit claims that the discrimination affects not only the amount the players are paid but also their playing, training, and travel conditions.

Coaching staff

RoleNameStart date
Head coach Flag of the United States.svg Jill Ellis May 2014
Assistant coach Flag of Sweden.svg Tony Gustavsson June 2012
Goalkeeper coach Flag of England.svg Graeme AbelMarch 2015
Fitness coach Flag of England.svg Dawn Scott February 2011
Talent identification Flag of the United States.svg B.J. Snow February 2017

Team

Current squad

The following 23 players were named to the roster for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. [80]

Caps and goals are current as of July 7, 2019, after match against Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands.

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Alyssa Naeher (1988-04-20) April 20, 1988 (age 31)530 Flag of the United States.svg Chicago Red Stars
181 GK Ashlyn Harris (1985-10-19) October 19, 1985 (age 33)210 Flag of the United States.svg Orlando Pride
211 GK Adrianna Franch (1990-11-12) November 12, 1990 (age 28)10 Flag of the United States.svg Portland Thorns

42 DF Becky Sauerbrunn (1985-06-06) June 6, 1985 (age 34)1640 Flag of the United States.svg Utah Royals
52 DF Kelley O'Hara (1988-08-04) August 4, 1988 (age 30)1242 Flag of the United States.svg Utah Royals
72 DF Abby Dahlkemper (1993-05-13) May 13, 1993 (age 26)470 Flag of the United States.svg North Carolina Courage
112 DF Ali Krieger (1984-07-28) July 28, 1984 (age 34)1031 Flag of the United States.svg Orlando Pride
122 DF Tierna Davidson (1998-09-19) September 19, 1998 (age 20)211 Flag of the United States.svg Chicago Red Stars
142 DF Emily Sonnett (1993-11-25) November 25, 1993 (age 25)340 Flag of the United States.svg Portland Thorns
192 DF Crystal Dunn (1992-07-03) July 3, 1992 (age 27)9224 Flag of the United States.svg North Carolina Courage

33 MF Sam Mewis (1992-10-09) October 9, 1992 (age 26)5614 Flag of the United States.svg North Carolina Courage
63 MF Morgan Brian (1993-02-26) February 26, 1993 (age 26)836 Flag of the United States.svg Chicago Red Stars
83 MF Julie Ertz (1992-04-06) April 6, 1992 (age 27)8819 Flag of the United States.svg Chicago Red Stars
93 MF Lindsey Horan (1994-05-26) May 26, 1994 (age 25)7410 Flag of the United States.svg Portland Thorns
163 MF Rose Lavelle (1995-05-14) May 14, 1995 (age 24)3310 Flag of the United States.svg Washington Spirit
203 MF Allie Long (1987-08-13) August 13, 1987 (age 31)466 Flag of the United States.svg Reign FC

24 FW Mallory Pugh (1998-04-29) April 29, 1998 (age 21)5617 Flag of the United States.svg Washington Spirit
104 FW Carli Lloyd (co-captain) (1982-07-16) July 16, 1982 (age 36)281113 Flag of the United States.svg Sky Blue FC
134 FW Alex Morgan (co-captain) (1989-07-02) July 2, 1989 (age 30)169107 Flag of the United States.svg Orlando Pride
154 FW Megan Rapinoe (co-captain) (1985-07-05) July 5, 1985 (age 34)15850 Flag of the United States.svg Reign FC
174 FW Tobin Heath (1988-05-29) May 29, 1988 (age 31)15630 Flag of the United States.svg Portland Thorns
224 FW Jessica McDonald (1988-02-28) February 28, 1988 (age 31)82 Flag of the United States.svg North Carolina Courage
234 FW Christen Press (1988-12-29) December 29, 1988 (age 30)12349 Flag of the United States.svg Utah Royals

Recent call-ups

The following players were also named to a squad in the last 12 months.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Jane Campbell (1995-02-17) February 17, 1995 (age 24)30 Flag of the United States.svg Houston Dash v. Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia; April 4, 2019 PRE

DF Casey Short (1990-08-23) August 23, 1990 (age 28)270 Flag of the United States.svg Chicago Red Stars v. Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium; April 7, 2019 PRE
DF Emily Fox (1998-07-05) July 5, 1998 (age 21)30 Flag of the United States.svg North Carolina Tar Heels 2019 SheBelieves Cup
DF Merritt Mathias (1990-07-02) July 2, 1990 (age 29)10 Flag of the United States.svg North Carolina Courage 2019 SheBelieves Cup PRE
DF Hailie Mace (1997-03-24) March 24, 1997 (age 22)30 Flag of Sweden.svg FC Rosengård 2018 CONCACAF Championship
DF Jaelene Hinkle (1993-05-28) May 28, 1993 (age 26)80 Flag of the United States.svg North Carolina Courage 2018 CONCACAF Championship PRO
DF Sofia Huerta (1992-12-14) December 14, 1992 (age 26)70 Flag of the United States.svg Houston Dash 2018 CONCACAF Championship PRO

MF Andi Sullivan (1995-12-20) December 20, 1995 (age 23)110 Flag of the United States.svg Washington Spirit v. Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium; April 7, 2019
MF McCall Zerboni (1986-12-13) December 13, 1986 (age 32)90 Flag of the United States.svg North Carolina Courage v. Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium; April 7, 2019
MF Danielle Colaprico (1993-05-06) May 6, 1993 (age 26)20 Flag of the United States.svg Chicago Red Stars 2019 SheBelieves Cup PRE

FW Savannah McCaskill (1996-07-31) July 31, 1996 (age 22)50 Flag of the United States.svg Chicago Red Stars 2018 CONCACAF Championship PRO
FW Kealia Ohai (1992-01-31) January 31, 1992 (age 27)31 Flag of the United States.svg Houston Dash 2018 CONCACAF Championship PRO
FW Amy Rodriguez (1987-02-17) February 17, 1987 (age 32)13230 Flag of the United States.svg Utah Royals 2018 CONCACAF Championship PRO
FW Lynn Williams (1993-05-21) May 21, 1993 (age 26)184 Flag of the United States.svg North Carolina Courage 2018 CONCACAF Championship PRO

Notes:

Recent schedule and results

The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

2018

GS: group stage SF: semi-final F: final

2019

Competitive record

For results in minor tournaments, see the History of the United States women's national football team

All-time results

YearMWDLGFGA Athlete of the Year Scoring leaderGAssist leaderACoachMajor tournam. result
19854013 Sharon Remer Michelle Akers 2 Mike Ryan
19866402 April Heinrichs Marcia McDermott 4 Anson Dorrance
198711614 Carin Gabarra April Heinrichs 7 Anson Dorrance
19888323 Joy Fawcett Carin Gabarra 5 C. Gabarra, K. Lilly 2 Anson Dorrance
19891010 April Heinrichs (none)(none) Anson Dorrance
19906600 Michelle Akers Michelle Akers 9 Kristine Lilly 3 Anson Dorrance
1991282116 Michelle Akers Michelle Akers 39 Carin Gabarra 21 Anson Dorrance World Cup (Champions)
19922002 Carin Gabarra (3 players tied)1 Tisha Venturini 2 Anson Dorrance
1993171304 Kristine Lilly Mia Hamm 10 Michelle Akers 6 Anson Dorrance
1994131201 Mia Hamm Michelle Akers 11 Michelle Akers 7 Anson Dorrance
1995231922 Mia Hamm Mia Hamm 19 Mia Hamm 18 Tony DiCicco World Cup (3rd place)
1996242121 Mia Hamm Tiffeny Milbrett 13 Mia Hamm 18 Tony DiCicco Olympics (Gold medal)
1997181602 Mia Hamm Mia Hamm 18 Tiffeny Milbrett 14 Tony DiCicco
1998252221 Mia Hamm Mia Hamm 20 Mia Hamm 20 Tony DiCicco
1999292522 Michelle Akers Tiffeny Milbrett 21 Mia Hamm 16 Tony DiCicco World Cup (Champions)
2000412696 Tiffeny Milbrett Cindy Parlow 19 Mia Hamm 14L. Gregg, A. Heinrichs Olympics (Silver medal)
200110325 Tiffeny Milbrett Tiffeny Milbrett 3 Mia Hamm 2 April Heinrichs
2002191522 Shannon MacMillan Shannon MacMillan 17 Aly Wagner 11 April Heinrichs
2003231742 Abby Wambach Abby Wambach 9 Mia Hamm 9 April Heinrichs World Cup (3rd place)
2004342842 Abby Wambach Abby Wambach 31 Mia Hamm 22 April Heinrichs Olympics (Gold medal)
20059810 Kristine Lilly Christie Welsh 7 A. Wagner, A. Wambach 5 Greg Ryan
2006221840 Kristine Lilly Abby Wambach 17 Abby Wambach 8 Greg Ryan
2007241941 Abby Wambach Abby Wambach 20 Kristine Lilly 8 Greg Ryan World Cup (3rd place)
2008363321 Carli Lloyd Natasha Kai 15 H. O'Reilly, A. Wambach 10 Pia Sundhage Olympics (Gold medal)
20098710 Hope Solo (3 players tied)2 Heather O'Reilly 3 Pia Sundhage
2010181521 Abby Wambach Abby Wambach 16 Lori Lindsey 7 Pia Sundhage
2011201343 Abby Wambach Abby Wambach 8 L. Holiday, M. Rapinoe 5 Pia Sundhage World Cup (2nd place)
2012322831 Alex Morgan Alex Morgan 28 Alex Morgan 21 P. Sundhage, J. Ellis Olympics (Gold medal)
2013161330 Abby Wambach Abby Wambach 11 L. Holiday, A. Wambach 6 Tom Sermanni
2014241653 Lauren Holiday Carli Lloyd 15 Carli Lloyd 8 T. Sermanni, J. Ellis
2015272052 Carli Lloyd Carli Lloyd 18 Megan Rapinoe 10 Jill Ellis World Cup (Champions)
2016252203 Tobin Heath C. Lloyd, A. Morgan17Carli Lloyd11 Jill Ellis
2017161213 Julie Ertz Alex Morgan 7Megan Rapinoe5Jill Ellis
2018201820Alex MorganAlex Morgan18Megan Rapinoe12Jill Ellis
Total63949970701,162250
Sources [81] [82] [83] [84]

Major

The two highest-profile tournaments the U.S. team participates in are the quadrennial FIFA Women's World Cup and the quadrennial Olympic Games.

World Cup

The team has participated in every World Cup through 2019 and won a medal in each.

YearResultMatchesWinsDrawsLossesGFGACoach
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 Champion6600255 Anson Dorrance
Flag of Sweden.svg 1995 Third Place6411155 Tony DiCicco
Flag of the United States.svg 1999 Champion6510183
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 Third Place6501155 April Heinrichs
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007 Third Place6411127 Greg Ryan
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 Second Place6321137 Pia Sundhage
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 Champion7610143 Jill Ellis
Flag of France.svg 2019 Champion7700263
Total8/850406413838

Olympic Games

The team has participated in every Olympic tournament through 2016 and reached the gold medal game in each until 2016, when they were eliminated in the quarterfinals on a penalty shootout loss to Sweden.

YearResultMatchesWinsDrawsLossesGFGACoach
Flag of the United States.svg 1996 Gold medal541093 Tony DiCicco
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 2000 Silver medal531195 April Heinrichs
Flag of Greece.svg 2004 Gold medal6510124
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2008 Gold medal6501125 Pia Sundhage
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg 2012 Gold medal6600166
Flag of Brazil.svg 2016 5th place422063 Jill Ellis
Flag of Japan.svg 2020 TBD-not yet qualified
Flag of France.svg 2024
Flag of the United States.svg 2028 Qualified as host
Total6/63326526325

Minor

CONCACAF Championship and Gold Cup

YearResultMatchesWinsDrawsLossesGFGACoach
Flag of Haiti.svg 1991 Champion5500490 Anson Dorrance
Flag of the United States.svg 1993 Champion3300130
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 1994 Champion4400161 Tony DiCicco
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 1998 Did not participate1
Flag of the United States.svg 2000 Champion5410241 April Heinrichs
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Flag of the United States.svg 2002 Champion5500241
Flag of the United States.svg 2006 Champion220041 Greg Ryan
Flag of Mexico.svg 2010 Third place5401222 Pia Sundhage
Flag of the United States.svg 2014 Champion5500210 Jill Ellis
Flag of the United States.svg 2018 Champion5500260
Total 8/93937111996

1 The US team directly qualified for the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup as hosts of the event. Because of this, they did not participate in the 1998 CONCACAF Championship, which was the qualification tournament for the World Cup.

Algarve Cup

The Algarve Cup is a global invitational tournament for national teams in women's football hosted by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). Held annually in the Algarve region of Portugal since 1994, it is one of the most prestigious women's football events, [85] alongside the Women's World Cup and Women's Olympic Football. Since 2016, the SheBelieves Cup has gained more interest from the very top ranked teams (USA, Germany, France and England) and thus shifted some attention from the tournament.

YearResultMatchesWinsDrawsLossesGFGACoach
1994 320161 Tony DiCicco
1995 4th Place421185
1996
1997
1998 4301106Tony DiCicco
1999 421184
2000 4400111 April Heinrichs
2001 6th Place410359
2002 5th Place421186
2003 422052
2004 4301115
2005 440090 Greg Ryan
2006 422091
2007 440083
2008 4400121 Pia Sundhage
2009 431051
2010 440093
2011 4400123
2012 4301112
2013 4310111 Tom Sermanni
2014 7th Place411277
2015 431071 Jill Ellis
Total [86] 20/227956111217262

SheBelieves Cup

The SheBelieves Cup is a global invitational tournament for national teams in women's football hosted in the United States.

YearResultMatchesWinsDrawsLossesGFGACoach
2016 330041 Jill Ellis
2017 4th Place310214
2018 321031
2019 312054
Total 4/4127321310

Player records

As of July 7, 2019. Active players are shown in Bold.

The women's national team boasts the first six players in the history of the game to have earned 200 caps.[ citation needed ] These players have since been joined in the 200-cap club by several players from other national teams, as well as by five more Americans: Kate Markgraf, Abby Wambach, Heather O'Reilly, Carli Lloyd and Hope Solo. Kristine Lilly and Christie Rampone are the only players to earn more than 300 caps.

In March 2004, Mia Hamm and Michelle Akers were the only two women and the only two Americans named to the FIFA 100, a list of the 125 greatest living football players chosen by Pelé as part of FIFA's centenary observances.

The USWNT All-Time Best XI was chosen In December 2013 by the United States Soccer Federation:


Most goals in a match
PlayerDateOpponentLocationCompetitionLine-up
Brandi Chastain April 18, 1991 [96] Flag of Mexico.svg Mexico [96] Port-au-Prince, Haiti World Cup Qualifying Tournament Substitute
Michelle Akers November 24, 1991 [96] Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei [96] Foshan, China 1991 FIFA World Cup Starting
Tiffeny Milbrett November 2, 2002 [96] Flag of Panama.svg Panama [96] Seattle, United States 2002 CONCACAF Gold Cup Starting
Abby Wambach October 23, 2004 [96] Flag of Ireland.svg Republic of Ireland [96] Houston, United States International Friendly Starting
Amy Rodriguez January 20, 2012 [96] Flag of the Dominican Republic.svg Dominican Republic [96] Vancouver, Canada 2012 Olympic Qualifying Tournament Substitute (46')
Sydney Leroux January 22, 2012 [96] Flag of Guatemala.svg Guatemala [96] Vancouver, Canada 2012 Olympic Qualifying Tournament Substitute (46')
Crystal Dunn February 15, 2016 [96] Flag of Puerto Rico.svg Puerto Rico [96] Frisco, United States 2016 Olympic Qualifying Tournament Starting
Alex Morgan June 11, 2019 [96] Flag of Thailand.svg Thailand [96] Reims, France 2019 FIFA World Cup Starting

The goal record is five for most scored in a match by a member of the USWNT, which has been accomplished by eight players.[ citation needed ]

Head coaches

As of July 7, 2019
NameYearsMatchesWonTiedLostWin %Pts÷MWorld CupOlympics
Flag of Ireland.svg Mike Ryan 19854013.1250.25
Flag of the United States.svg Anson Dorrance 1986–19949265522.7342.17
Flag of the United States.svg Tony DiCicco 1994–199912110588.9012.66
Flag of the United States.svg Lauren Gregg 1997, 20003210.8332.33
Flag of the United States.svg April Heinrichs 2000–2004124872017.7822.27
Flag of the United States.svg Greg Ryan 2005–2007554591.9002.62
Flag of Sweden.svg Pia Sundhage 2007–201210791106.8972.64
Flag of Scotland.svg Tom Sermanni 2013–2014241842.8332.42
Flag of the United States.svg Flag of England.svg Jill Ellis 127102187.8742.55
Totals6575157666.8422.47

Source [97]

Honors

See also

Related Research Articles

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