Cloud Peak

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Cloud Peak
Cloud Peak viewed from Paint Rock Creek.jpg
Cloud Peak, from Paint Rock Creek drainage.
Highest point
Elevation 13,171 ft (4,015 m) [1]
Prominence 7,067 ft (2,154 m) [2]
Listing
Coordinates 44°22′56″N107°10′26″W / 44.3821°N 107.173914436°W / 44.3821; -107.173914436 Coordinates: 44°22′56″N107°10′26″W / 44.3821°N 107.173914436°W / 44.3821; -107.173914436
Geography
USA Wyoming location map.svg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Cloud Peak
Wyoming
Location Big Horn / Johnson counties, Wyoming, U.S.
Parent range Bighorn Mountains
Topo map USGS Cloud Peak
Climbing
First ascent 1897
Easiest route Hike/scramble

Cloud Peak is the highest peak within the Bighorn Mountains in the U.S. state of Wyoming. It rises to an elevation of 13,171 feet (4,015 m) [1] and provides onlookers with dramatic views and vistas. The mountain can be climbed most easily from the western side, accessed by either the Battle Park or West Tensleep trail-heads and is roughly 24 miles round-trip from both. The peak is located in the 189,000 acre (765 km²) Cloud Peak Wilderness within Bighorn National Forest. The northeast slope of Cloud Peak is a deep cirque which harbors Cloud Peak Glacier, the last active glacier in the Bighorn Mountains.

Contents

Cloud Peak is on the border between Johnson County and Big Horn County in Wyoming and is the high point of both counties. [2] As the high point of an isolated range, Cloud Peak has the greatest topographic prominence in the state, 7,077 feet (2,157 m), one foot more than the state's highest mountain, 13,810 foot (4,210 m) Gannett Peak, [3] and fifteenth greatest in the contiguous United States. [4]

See also

Related Research Articles

Gannett Peak

Gannett Peak is the highest mountain peak in the U.S. state of Wyoming at 13,810 feet (4,210 m). It lies in the Wind River Range within the Bridger Wilderness of the Bridger-Teton National Forest. Straddling the Continental Divide along the boundary between Fremont and Sublette counties, it has the second greatest topographic prominence in the state (7076') after Cloud Peak (7077'), and is the highest ground for 290.36 miles in any direction.

Castle Peak (Colorado)

Castle Peak is the ninth highest summit of the Rocky Mountains of North America and the U.S. state of Colorado. The prominent 14,279-foot (4352.2 m) fourteener is the highest summit of the Elk Mountains and the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness. The peak is located 11.6 miles (18.7 km) northeast by north of the Town of Crested Butte, Colorado, United States, on the drainage divide separating Gunnison National Forest and Gunnison County from White River National Forest and Pitkin County. The summit of Castle Peak is the highest point of both counties.

Mount Jefferson (Nevada)

Mount Jefferson is the highest mountain in both the Toquima Range and Nye County in Nevada, United States. It is the sixth highest mountain in the state. As the high point of a range which is well separated from other ranges by low basins, Mount Jefferson has a high topographic prominence of 5,861 feet (1,786 m). This makes it the most prominent peak in Nye County and the third most prominent peak in Nevada. For similar reasons, it is also the highest mountain for over 90 miles in all directions. It is located about 50 miles (80 km) northeast of the county seat of Tonopah within the Alta Toquima Wilderness of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, near the smaller towns of Carvers and Round Mountain. Three distinct summits are located on a broad area of subalpine tundra: North Summit rises to 11,820 feet (3,603 m), Middle Summit to 11,692 feet (3,564 m), and South Summit to 11,949 feet (3,642 m). During the Pleistocene, alpine glaciers eroded several cirques east of the summit plateau.

Black Tooth Mountain

Black Tooth Mountain is located in the Bighorn Mountains in the U.S. state of Wyoming. The peak is the second highest in the range after Cloud Peak, which is only 1.5 miles (2.4 km) to the south, and the summit is located in the Cloud Peak Wilderness of Bighorn National Forest. The sharp dark profile of the mountain resembles a dark tooth or fang, hence the name. Because of the steep terrain, Black Tooth Mountain is one of the hardest mountains to climb in the Bighorns. Many of the trails up the mountain are unmarked which adds to the difficulty of reaching the summit. Mount Woolsey is an adjacent summit only .20 mi (0.32 km) to the southeast. Another high peak of the Bighorns known as Hallelujah Peak is situated along a knife-like ridge known as an arête .64 mi (1.03 km) to the northeast. Several tiny remnant glaciers can be found on the north slopes of Black Tooth Mountain.

Mount Woolsey

Mount Woolsey is located in the Bighorn Mountains in the U.S. state of Wyoming. The peak is the third highest in the range after Cloud Peak, which is only 1.3 miles (2.1 km) to the south, and the summit is located in the Cloud Peak Wilderness of Bighorn National Forest. Black Tooth Mountain, the second highest mountain in the Bighorns, is an adjacent summit only .20 mi (0.32 km) to the northwest. Mount Woolsey is on a knife-like ridge known as an arête and is connected to both Black Tooth Mountain and Cloud Peak by this ridge. Along the arête is another mountain peak known as The Innominate. A small glacier lies below the arête to the southeast of Mount Woolsey.

Darton Peak

Darton Peak is located in the Bighorn Mountains in the U.S. state of Wyoming. The peak is the eighth-highest in the range and it is in the Cloud Peak Wilderness of Bighorn National Forest. Darton Peak is 1.5 miles (2.4 km) north of Bighorn Peak and 4.5 mi (7.2 km) southeast of Mather Peaks.

References

  1. 1 2 "Cloud Peak". NGS data sheet. U.S. National Geodetic Survey.
  2. 1 2 "Cloud Peak, Wyoming". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2011-05-13.
  3. "Wyoming 13,000-foot Peaks" . Retrieved 2011-05-09.
  4. "Most Prominent Peaks of the U.S. States". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2011-05-13.