Latin Grammy Award

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Latin Grammy Award
Ambox current red.svg 20th Annual Latin Grammy Awards
Latingrammylogo.JPG
Awarded forOutstanding achievements in the Latin music industry, primarily for works recorded in either Spanish or Portuguese
CountryUnited States
Presented by The Latin Recording Academy
First awardedSeptember 13, 2000;18 years ago (2000-09-13)
Website Website
Television/radio coverage
Network CBS: 2000-2004
Univision: 2005-present
Most recent Latin Grammy Award winners
  2016-17 Best in 2017-18 2018-19  
  Luismigueltour.jpg Premios Goya 2018 - Jorge Drexler.jpg
Award Album of the Year Record of the Year
Winner Luis Miguel
( ¡México Por Siempre! )
Jorge Drexler
("Telefonía")
  Premios Goya 2018 - Jorge Drexler.jpg Karol G Telemedellin.jpg
Award Song of the Year Best New Artist
Winner Jorge Drexler
("Telefonía")
Karol G

Previous Record of the Year

"Despacito"

Record of the Year

"Telefonía"

A Latin Grammy Award is an award by The Latin Recording Academy to recognize outstanding achievement in the Latin music industry. The Latin Grammy honors works produced anywhere around the world that were recorded in either Spanish or Portuguese and is awarded in the United States. [1] Submissions of products recorded in regional languages from Latin America and the Iberian Peninsula of Hispanophone or Lusophone countries such as Catalan, Guarani, Quechua may also be considered. [2] Both the regular Grammy Award and the Latin Grammy Award have similar nominating and voting processes, in which the selections are decided by peers within the Latin music industry.

The Latin Recording Academy organization

The Latin Recording Academy, formally known as the Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, is a multinational membership-based association composed of music industry professionals, musicians, producers, recording engineers, and other creative and technical recording professionals. They are dedicated to promoting Latin music and its makers, both inside and outside the United States. The academy is headquartered in Miami. The Latin Recording Academy is internationally known for the Latin Grammy Awards. Gabriel Abaroa serves as President and CEO of the organization.

Music industry companies and individuals that create and sell music

The music industry consists of the companies and individuals that earn money by creating new songs and pieces and selling live concerts and shows, audio and video recordings, compositions and sheet music, and the organizations and associations that aid and represent music creators. Among the many individuals and organizations that operate in the industry are: the songwriters and composers who create new songs and musical pieces; the singers, musicians, conductors and bandleaders who perform the music; the companies and professionals who create and sell recorded music and/or sheet music ; and those that help organize and present live music performances.

Catalan language Romance language

Catalan is a Western Romance language derived from Vulgar Latin and named after the medieval Principality of Catalonia, in northeastern modern Spain. It is the only official language of Andorra, and a co-official language of the Spanish autonomous communities of Catalonia, the Balearic Islands and Valencia. It also has semi-official status in the Italian comune of Alghero. It is also spoken in the eastern strip of Aragon, in some villages of Region of Murcia called Carche and in the Pyrénées-Orientales department of France. These territories are often called Països Catalans or "Catalan Countries".

Contents

The first annual Latin Grammys ceremony was held at the Staples Center in Los Angeles on September 13, 2000. Broadcast by CBS, that first ceremony became the first primarily Spanish language primetime program carried on an English-language American television network. The most-recent ceremony, the 19th Annual Latin Grammy Awards, was held on November 15, 2018 at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada. The upcoming 20th Annual Latin Grammy Awards will be held on November 14, 2019 at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas.

Staples Center Arena in California, United States

Staples Center, officially stylized as STAPLES Center, is a multi-purpose arena in Downtown Los Angeles. Adjacent to the L.A. Live development, it is located next to the Los Angeles Convention Center complex along Figueroa Street. The arena opened on October 17, 1999.

Los Angeles City in California

Los Angeles, officially the City of Los Angeles and often known by its initials L.A., is the most populous city in California, the second most populous city in the United States, after New York City, and the third most populous city in North America. With an estimated population of nearly four million, Los Angeles is the cultural, financial, and commercial center of Southern California. The city is known for its Mediterranean climate, ethnic diversity, Hollywood and the entertainment industry, and its sprawling metropolis. Los Angeles is the largest city on the West Coast of North America.

CBS is an American English language commercial broadcast television and radio network that is a flagship property of CBS Corporation. The company is headquartered at the CBS Building in New York City with major production facilities and operations in New York City and Los Angeles.

Since 2005, the awards are broadcast in the United States by the television network Univision. [3] In 2013, 9.8 million people watched the Latin Grammy Awards on Univision, making the channel a top-three network for the night in the U.S. [4]

Univision US-based Spanish-language TV channel

Univision is an American Spanish-language free-to-air television network that is owned by Univision Communications. It is the country's largest provider of Spanish-language content, followed by American competitor Telemundo. The network's programming is aimed at Hispanic Americans and includes telenovelas and other drama series, sports, sitcoms, reality and variety series, news programming, and imported Spanish-language feature films. Univision is headquartered in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, and has its major studios, production facilities, and business operations based in Doral, Florida.

The Big Three television networks are the three major traditional commercial broadcast television networks in the United States: the American Broadcasting Company (ABC), CBS and the National Broadcasting Company (NBC). Until the 1980s, the Big Three networks dominated U.S. television.

History

The Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences (now The Latin Recording Academy) was formed by the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences (now The Recording Academy) in 1997. It was founded by Michael Greene and Producers & Songwriters Rudy Pérez & Mauricio Abaroa. Rudy Pérez was the Grammy Florida chapter's first President of the Board. The concept of a separate Grammy Awards for Latin music began in 1989. [5] According to organizers, the Latin Grammy Awards was established as the Latin music universe was deemed too large to fit on the Grammy Awards. [6] The Latin Grammy Awards mainly encompasses music from Latin America, Spain, Portugal, and the United States. [7] [8] In 2000, it was announced that the 1st Annual Latin Grammy Awards would take place at the Staples Center on September 13, 2000. On July 7, 2000, the nominations were announced in Miami, Florida, United States. The Latin Grammys were introduced with over 39 categories included limited to Spanish and Portuguese-speaking recordings. The first telecast took place at the Staples Center and was broadcast. The following year's show was canceled due to the September 11, 2001 attacks, which was the same day the show was to take place. [9] In 2002, the academy elected its first independent Board of Trustees. In 2005, the broadcast was moved from CBS to Univision where the whole telecast was in Spanish. [10]

The Recording Academy U.S. organization of musicians, producers, recording engineers and other recording professionals

The Recording Academy is an American learned academy of musicians, producers, recording engineers, and other musical professionals. It is famous for its Grammy Awards, which recognize achievements in the music industry.

Rudy Pérez American musician

Rudy Amado Pérez is a Cuban-born American musician, songwriter, composer, producer, arranger, sound engineer, musical director and singer, as well as entertainment entrepreneur, and philanthropist. His area of specialty is ballads, although he has also worked in a variety of other genres.

The music of Latin America refers to music originating from Latin America, namely the Romance-speaking countries and territories of the Americas and the Caribbean south of the United States. Latin American music also incorporates African music from slaves who were transported to the Americas by European settlers as well as music from the indigenous peoples of the Americas. Due to its highly syncretic nature, Latin American music encompasses a wide variety of styles, including influential genres such as cumbia, bachata, bossa nova, merengue, rumba, salsa, samba, son, and tango. During the 20th century, many styles were influenced by the music of the United States giving rise to genres such as Latin pop, rock, jazz, hip hop, and reggaeton.

Voting members live in various regions in the US and outside of the US including Latin America, Spain, and Portugal. [11] To be eligible a recording must have at least 51% of its content recorded in Spanish or Portuguese and has been commercially released in North America, Central America, South America, the Caribbean, Spain, or Portugal. [12] Products recorded in languages and dialects such as Catalan, Nahuatl, Quechua, Galician, Valencian, Mayan, may be accepted by majority vote of the committees of the Latin Recording Academy. For instrumental music, the Latin Recording Academy accepts recordings that have been composed or interpreted by an Iberian American musician. [1] The eligibility period is June 1 to May 30 for a respective awards ceremony. Recordings are first entered and then reviewed to determine the awards they are eligible for. Following that, nominating ballots are mailed to voting members of the academy. The votes are tabulated and the five recordings in each category with the most votes become the nominees. Final voting ballots are sent out to voting members and the winners are determined. Winners are later announced at the Latin Grammy Awards. The current President & CEO of the Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences is Gabriel Abaroa, [13] who is related to Mauricio, one of the founders.

Ibero-America Countries in the Americas which were formerly colonies of Spain or Portugal

Ibero-America or Iberian America is a region in the Americas comprising countries or territories where Spanish or Portuguese are predominant languages, usually former territories of Portugal or Spain. Portugal and Spain are themselves included in some definitions, such as that of the Ibero-American Summit and the Organization of Ibero-American States. The Organization of Ibero-American States also includes Spanish-speaking Equatorial Guinea, in Central Africa, but not the Portuguese-speaking African countries.

Gabriel Abaroa Jr. is the current president & CEO of the Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences (LARAS), which presents the Latin Grammy Awards. LARAS was established in 1997 and the first Latin Grammy Awards took place in 2000.

Altogether there are three events: the Life Achievement when renowned artists are honored for lifetime achievement; Person of the Year, when one artist is honored at a gala dinner, and Grammy itself, an award that brings together artists from all over Latin America and the Iberian Peninsula and that today is broadcast live to 80 countries, including Brazil, by channel Univision (TNT in Brazil). [14]

The Latin Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award is an honor presented annually by the Latin Recording Academy, the same organization that distributes the Latin Grammy Awards, to commend performers "who have made unprecedented contributions of outstanding artistic significance to Latin music and the Latin community". Award recipients are honored during "Latin Grammy Week", a string of galas just prior to the annual Latin Grammy Awards ceremony.

The Latin Recording Academy Person of the Year is an award presented annually by the Latin Recording Academy, the same organization that distributes the Latin Grammy Awards, to commend musicians for their artistic achievement in the Latin music industry and dedication to philanthropy. Award recipients are honored during "Latin Grammy Week", a string of galas just prior to the annual Latin Grammy Awards ceremony.

Awards

Award categories

Alike from the Grammy Award there is a general field consisting of four genre-less award categories:

The rest of the fields are genre-specific. [15] Special non-competitive awards are also given out for more long-lasting contributions to the Latin music industry.

The first telecast had 40 awards presented however the following year 38 awards were presented. The most recent telecast in 2010 had a total of 46 awards presented.[ citation needed ]

Leading winners

With 21 Latin Grammy Awards, Calle 13 have won the most Latin Grammy Awards. Juanes, with 19 Latin Grammy Awards, holds the record for most awards won by a solo artist. Shakira is the biggest winner among female artists with 13 awards.

Criticism

As with its Grammy Awards counterpart, the Latin Grammy Awards has also received criticism from various recording artists and music journalists.

Upon the announcement of the Latin Grammy Awards in 1999, several musical journalists raised concerns about the awards being used as a marketing tool by the mainstream media. Manny S. Gonzalez of the Vista En L.A felt that the award would just be used to advertise artists being promoted by Emilio Estefan. The lack of categories for non Spanish and Portuguese-speaking music has been criticized, namely by artists who consider their work to be "Latin" but are not eligible for a Latin Grammy including those from Haiti and Celtic musicians from the Galicia and Asturias regions of Spain. [6] [16] The linguistic requirement has also been criticized by Tony Succar whose album, Unity: The Latin Tribute to Michael Jackson , was not eligible for a Latin Grammy Award despite the album being recorded in salsa. In response to the criticism, a spokesman for the Latin Recording Academy stated: "The Latin Recording Academy considers music based on the contents of the recording itself -- the technical elements that go into the art of music making -- not based on how a recording or an artist is marketed externally." [17] In 2001, Cuban exiles living in Miami protested at the Latin Grammy Awards for allowing musicians living in Cuba to perform at the stage. This resulted in the Latin Grammys being moved to Los Angeles for the second annual awards (which would eventually be canceled due to the aforementioned September 11 attacks). [18]

Venezuelan singer-songwriter Franco de Vita called the Latin Grammys "fake and a lie" and stated that if he were to win the award, he would not accept it. [19] He later received a Latin Grammy for his album En Primera Fila . American musician Willie Colón observed the relationship between the Latin Grammys and major Latin record labels. [20] Mexican singer-songwriter Aleks Syntek noted that Mexican artists in general were apathetic towards the awards. [21]

Ceremony locations

The Latin Grammy Awards are held annually in Las Vegas. The ceremony has been held there annually since 2009 and was first held there in 2007. The ceremony spent its first few years being held in Los Angeles and in 2003 took place in Miami. The ceremony had also been held once in New York City and Houston.

In Las Vegas the ceremony has been held at three different venues over the years; the Mandalay Bay Events Center, the MGM Grand Garden Arena and the T-Mobile Arena.

See also

Related Research Articles

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A Grammy Award, or Grammy, is an award presented by The Recording Academy to recognize achievements in the music industry. The annual presentation ceremony features performances by prominent artists, and the presentation of those awards that have a more popular interest. The Grammys are the second of the Big Three major music awards held annually.

The Grammy Award for Best Latin Pop Album is an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for releasing albums in the Latin pop genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".

The Latin Grammy Award for Album of the Year is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and creates a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally. The award is given to the performers, producers, audio engineers and mastering engineers for vocal or instrumental albums with 51% of new recorded songs. Albums of previously released recordings, such as reissues, compilations of old recordings and greatest hits albums packages are not eligible. Due to the increasing musical changes in the industry, from 2012 the category includes 10 nominees, according to a restructuration made by the academy for the four general categories: Song of the Year, Record of the Year, Best New Artist and Album of the Year. Beginning in 2018, songwriters are eligible for the accolade if 33% of the playing time are composed by them.

The Latin Grammy Award for Best New Artist is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and creates a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists, nationally and internationally. The award is given to solo artists or groups that first establish an identity to the public as a performer and release a Spanish or Portuguese language recording during the period of eligibility. In 2012, the Academy announced the category would include ten nominees to reflect changes within the music industry.

The Latin Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album is an honor presented annually by the Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and promotes a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally. According to the category description guide for the 2012 Latin Grammy Awards, the award is for vocal or instrumental alternative albums containing at least 51 percent newly recorded material. It is awarded to solo artists, duos or groups.

The Latin Grammy Award for Best Urban Music Album is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and promotes a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally. According to the category description guide for the 13th Latin Grammy Awards, the award is for vocal or instrumental merengue house, R&B, reggaeton, rap and/or hip hop music albums containing at least 51 percent playing time of newly recorded material. The award was first presented as the Best Rap/Hip-Hop Album until it received its current name, Best Urban Music Album, at the 5th Latin Grammy Awards ceremony in 2004.

The Latin Grammy Award for Best Urban Song is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and promotes a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally. According to the category description guide for the 13th Latin Grammy Awards, the award is for new songs that contain at least 51% of the lyrics in Spanish or Portuguese. The accolade is awarded to the songwriter(s) of said song. Instrumental recordings and cover songs are not eligible for the category.

The Latin Grammy Award for Best Singer-Songwriter Album is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and creates a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally. According to the category description guide for the 13th Latin Grammy Awards, the award is reserved for solo artists or duos and they "must compose and interpret 75 percent of the album on their own to be eligible in this category". Additionally, live albums are eligible if they contain at least 51 percent of new unreleased material released within the eligibility period.

The 8th Lo Nuestro Awards ceremony, presented by Univision honoring the best Latin music of 1995 and 1996 took place on May 9, 1996, at a live presentation held at the James L. Knight Center in Miami, Florida. The ceremony was broadcast in the United States and Latin America by Univision.

The 11th Lo Nuestro Awards ceremony, presented by Univision honoring the best Latin music of 1998 and 1999 took place on May 6, 1999, at a live presentation held at the James L. Knight Center in Miami, Florida. The ceremony was broadcast in the United States and Latin America by Univision.

The 12th Lo Nuestro Awards ceremony, presented by Univision honoring the best Latin music of 1999 and 2000 took place on May 5, 2000, at a live presentation held at the James L. Knight Center in Miami, Florida. The ceremony was broadcast in the United States and Latin America by Univision.

The 2nd Lo Nuestro Awards ceremony, presented by Univision honoring the best Latin music of 1989 and 1990 took place on May 24, 1990, at a live presentation held at the Knight Center in Miami, Florida. The ceremony was broadcast in the United States and Latin America by Univision.

The 1st Lo Nuestro Awards ceremony, presented by Univision honoring the best Latin music of 1988 and 1989 took place in May 31, 1989 at the Knight Center, in Miami, Florida, United States. The ceremony was broadcast in the United States and Latin America by Univision.

The 25th Lo Nuestro Awards ceremony, presented by the American network Univision, honored the best Latin music of 2012 in the United States and took place on February 21, 2013, at the American Airlines Arena in Miami, Florida beginning at 5:00 p.m. PST / 8:00 p.m. EST. During the ceremony, Lo Nuestro Awards were presented in 33 categories. The ceremony, televised in the United States by Univision, was produced by Antonio Guzmán. Mexican performers Ninel Conde and Pedro Fernández hosted the show.

The 28th Lo Nuestro Awards ceremony, presented by the American network Univision, honoring the best Latin music of 2015 in the United States, took place on February 18, 2016, at the American Airlines Arena in Miami, Florida beginning at 5:00 p.m. PST. During the ceremony, Lo Nuestro Awards were presented in 26 categories. The ceremony was televised in the United States by Univision. Mexican actors Galilea Montijo and Arath de la Torre hosted the show.

This is a list of notable events in Latin music that took place in 1996.

This is a list of notable events in Latin music that took place in 1998.

This is a list of notable events in Latin music that took place in 2001.

References

  1. 1 2 "FAQ". Latin Grammy Awards . Latin Recording Academy . Retrieved November 18, 2014.
  2. Kathy (September 26, 2012). "The Cathedral of Latin Music". Hispanic Executive. Retrieved December 11, 2016.
  3. "Latin Grammys on Univision for another six years: Latin Recording Academy extends deal with network". June 26, 2012. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  4. "The Latin Grammy Awards Celebrates Obama's Immigration Plan". November 21, 2014. p.  Time . Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  5. Pareles, Jon (September 16, 2000). "Critic's Notebook; Latin Faces Light Up TV Courtesy of The Grammys". The New York Times . The New York Times Company . Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  6. 1 2 Valdes-Rodriguez, Alisa (September 12, 2000). "One Little Word, Yet It Means So Much". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Company. Retrieved December 25, 2013.
  7. "Billboard Spotlights Spain & Portugal". Billboard . Nielsen N.V. 111 (47): 91. November 20, 1999. ISSN   0006-2510 . Retrieved September 3, 2015.
  8. Fernandez, Enrique (March 5, 2000). "After Birthing Pains, Latin Grammys Should Grow Strong". Sun-Sentinel . Retrieved March 9, 2017.
  9. O'Toole, Caitlin (September 11, 2001). "Emmys, Latin Grammys Canceled". People . Retrieved July 25, 2011.
  10. http://corporate.univision.com/corp/en/pr/MIAMI_31102005-0.html%5B%5D
  11. Garza, Augustin (May 18, 2002). "Latin Grammys Struggle With Loss of Momentum". Los Angeles Times . Tribune Company . Retrieved September 24, 2014.
  12. "Membership Application" (PDF). Latingrammy.com. Latin Recording Academy. Retrieved June 24, 2015.
  13. Academy, The Latin Recording. "The Latin Recording Academy® Promotes Gabriel Abaroa Jr. to President/CEO" . Retrieved February 3, 2017.
  14. "Grammy Latino 2013" . Retrieved February 3, 2017.
  15. Have You Listened to Hispanic Christian Music Lately? Archived July 18, 2012, at Archive.today Andree Farias CCM Magazine July 12, 2005 – “Now the Latin GRAMMYs have a category for Hispanic Christian music, and so do the Latin Billboard awards.” Unlike the GRAMMYs (which ..."
  16. Valdes-Rodriguez, Alisa (June 25, 1999). "New Latin Grammys Introduced". Los Angeles Times . Tribune Company . Retrieved December 25, 2013.
  17. Cantor-Navas, Judy (September 22, 2015). "Michael Jackson Salsa Tribute Album Producer Protests Not Being Eligible for Latin Grammys". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved October 2, 2015.
  18. Vanhorn, Teri (August 20, 2001). "Latin Grammys Relocated To Avoid Miami Protests". MTV . Retrieved August 30, 2014.
  19. "Franco De Vita Dice Que Los Premios Latin Grammy Son Falsos". La Grande 107.5 (in Spanish). October 7, 2010. Retrieved August 30, 2014.
  20. Música “Latina” y los Premios Grammy: una visión critica (un texto deWillie Colon) (*). Introducción y traducción del inglés de Alejandro Cardona. Suplemento 33 (in Spanish)
  21. Aleks Syntek critica al GRAMMY (in Spanish) Univision.com Accessed on August 30, 2014

Further reading