Monroe County, Mississippi

Last updated
Monroe County
MONROE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ABERDEEN, MONROE COUNTY. MS.jpg
Former Monroe County Courthouse in Aberdeen.
Map of Mississippi highlighting Monroe County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Mississippi
Mississippi in United States.svg
Mississippi's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 33°53′N88°29′W / 33.89°N 88.49°W / 33.89; -88.49
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Mississippi.svg  Mississippi
Founded1821
Named for James Monroe
Seat Aberdeen
Largest city Amory
Area
  Total772 sq mi (2,000 km2)
  Land765 sq mi (1,980 km2)
  Water7.0 sq mi (18 km2)  0.9%
Population
 (2010)
  Total36,989
  Estimate 
(2018)
35,564
  Density48/sq mi (18/km2)
Time zone UTC−6 (Central)
  Summer (DST) UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district 1st
Website www.monroems.com

Monroe County is a county on the northeast border of the U.S. state of Mississippi next to Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 36,989. [1] Its county seat is Aberdeen. [2]

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, a county is an administrative or political subdivision of a state that consists of a geographic region with specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs, respectively.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders.

Mississippi State in the United States

Mississippi is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. Mississippi is the 32nd largest and 34th-most populous of the 50 United States. Mississippi is bordered to the north by Tennessee, to the east by Alabama, to the south by the Gulf of Mexico, to the southwest by Louisiana, and to the northwest by Arkansas. Mississippi's western boundary is largely defined by the Mississippi River. Jackson is both the state's capital and largest city. Greater Jackson, with an estimated population of 580,166 in 2018, is the most populous metropolitan area in Mississippi and the 95th-most populous in the United States.

Contents

History

The county is named in honor of James Monroe, fifth President of the United States. [3] Part of the county east of the Tombigbee River originally made-up part of the Alabama Territory, belonging to Marion County, until new lines of demarcation put it in the State of Mississippi in 1821. [4]

James Monroe Fifth President of the United States

James Monroe was an American statesman, lawyer, diplomat and Founding Father who served as the fifth president of the United States from 1817 to 1825. A member of the Democratic-Republican Party, Monroe was the last president of the Virginia dynasty; his presidency coincided with the Era of Good Feelings. He is perhaps best known for issuing the Monroe Doctrine, a policy of opposing European colonialism in the Americas. He also served as the governor of Virginia, a member of the United States Senate, the U.S. ambassador to France and Britain, the seventh Secretary of State, and the eighth Secretary of War.

Tombigbee River river in the United States of America

The Tombigbee River is a tributary of the Mobile River, approximately 200 mi (325 km) long, in the U.S. states of Mississippi and Alabama. Together with the Alabama, it merges to form the short Mobile River before the latter empties into Mobile Bay on the Gulf of Mexico. The Tombigbee watershed encompasses much of the rural coastal plain of western Alabama and northeastern Mississippi, flowing generally southward. The river provides one of the principal routes of commercial navigation in the southern United States, as it is navigable along much of its length through locks and connected in its upper reaches to the Tennessee River via the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway.

Alabama Territory territory of the USA between 1817-1819

The Territory of Alabama was an organized incorporated territory of the United States. The Alabama Territory was carved from the Mississippi Territory on August 15, 1817 and lasted until December 14, 1819, when it was admitted to the Union as the twenty-second state.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 772 square miles (2,000 km2), of which 765 square miles (1,980 km2) is land and 7.0 square miles (18 km2) (0.9%) is water. [5]

In 1922, the Commissioner of Agriculture for the county published a report in a local newspaper which described in some detail the soil conditions and agriculture of the county. [6] He described the areas as the Black Lands and the soil as black lime, a "stiff" soil, derived from the Selma chalk formation and extremely rich in potassium and phosphorus. [6]

Flora

Sweet clover is an indigenous wild ground cover in the county. [6]

Major highways

Mississippi Highway 6 highway in Mississippi

Mississippi Highway 6 (MS 6) runs east–west from MS 161 in Lyon, east to MS 25 near Amory. It travels approximately 136 miles (219 km), serving Coahoma, Quitman, Panola, Lafayette, Pontotoc, Lee, and Monroe Counties. West of Tupelo, it is concurrent with US 278.

Mississippi Highway 8 runs east–west from U.S. Highway 278 northeast of Aberdeen, to MS 1 in Rosedale.

Mississippi Highway 25 highway in Mississippi

Mississippi Highway 25 runs from I-55 in Jackson, Mississippi to the Tennessee state line north of Iuka. The largely controlled-access part from Jackson to Starkville connects the state capital with the main campus of Mississippi State University.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1820 2,721
1830 3,86141.9%
1840 9,250139.6%
1850 21,172128.9%
1860 21,2830.5%
1870 22,6316.3%
1880 28,55326.2%
1890 30,7307.6%
1900 31,2161.6%
1910 35,17812.7%
1920 32,613−7.3%
1930 36,14110.8%
1940 37,6484.2%
1950 36,543−2.9%
1960 33,953−7.1%
1970 34,0430.3%
1980 36,4046.9%
1990 36,5820.5%
2000 38,0143.9%
2010 36,989−2.7%
Est. 201835,564 [7] −3.9%
U.S. Decennial Census [8]
1790-1960 [9] 1900-1990 [10]
1990-2000 [11] 2010-2013 [1]

As of the census [12] of 2000, there were 38,014 people, 14,603 households, and 10,660 families residing in the county. The population density was 50 people per square mile (19/km²). There were 16,236 housing units at an average density of 21 per square mile (8/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 68.37% White, 30.77% Black or African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.11% from other races, and 0.47% from two or more races. 0.69% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 14,603 households out of which 34.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.00% were married couples living together, 17.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.00% were non-families. 24.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the county, the population was spread out with 27.20% under the age of 18, 8.70% from 18 to 24, 27.60% from 25 to 44, 22.50% from 45 to 64, and 14.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 89.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,307, and the median income for a family was $36,749. Males had a median income of $30,232 versus $20,411 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,072. About 13.60% of families and 17.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.30% of those under age 18 and 21.70% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

As of 1922, both the largest creamery and the largest hog-feeding plant "in the South" were located in the county. [6]

As of 1922, corn was the most important grain crop grown in the county. [6] Corn was typically planted after the planting and harvest of a crop of clover or oats. [6] At that time, oat crops typically yielded forty to sixty bushels per acre. [6] Other crops grown, either for harvest or pasture, included wheat, rye, barley, rape, cotton, Japan clover. [6] Monroe had the largest acreage devoted to alfalfa production and exported more alfalfa hay than any other county in the state. [6]

Communities

Cities

Towns

Village

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Ghost towns

Politics

Presidential election results
Presidential election results [13]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 64.0%10,16734.8% 5,5241.2% 193
2012 57.5%9,72341.7% 7,0560.8% 139
2008 58.2%10,18441.0% 7,1690.8% 143
2004 59.5%9,30839.9% 6,2370.6% 87
2000 55.4%7,39743.3% 5,7831.4% 180
1996 46.0%5,20645.8% 5,1848.3% 934
1992 49.0%5,99440.4% 4,93310.6% 1,297
1988 57.7%6,44741.8% 4,6690.5% 57
1984 62.3%7,38737.4% 4,4370.3% 36
1980 39.2% 4,79357.2%6,9983.7% 448
1976 42.2% 4,73754.3%6,0973.6% 400
1972 84.1%7,27314.8% 1,2791.1% 96
1968 11.1% 1,16714.3% 1,50674.6%7,856
1964 85.1%5,62714.9% 985
1960 28.8% 1,40039.1%1,90132.1% 1,559
1956 15.3% 70578.5%3,6306.3% 289
1952 28.8% 1,41771.3%3,512
1948 1.8% 5421.1% 62477.1%2,281
19444.9% 15995.1%3,104
19402.8% 9497.1%3,2630.1% 3
19361.7% 5598.2%3,1990.1% 3
19322.3% 8297.6%3,4480.1% 3
192811.0% 37689.0%3,033
19244.9% 12193.8%2,3261.3% 32
19206.8% 13992.5%1,8810.7% 14
19164.6% 8294.6%1,6840.8% 15
19121.7% 2595.8%1,3772.5% 36

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 22, 2011. Retrieved September 4, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 212.
  4. John M. Allman III (ed.), "An Abbreviated History of Marion County, Ala.", The Marion County Historical & Genealogical Societies, Alabama Tracks vol. XI #4 1992. See online at: "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-04-07. Retrieved 2014-04-02.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 28, 2013. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Holmes, G.M. (August 11, 1922). "Types of soils and crops of Monroe County, Miss". The Aberdeen Examiner. 57 (8). Aberdeen, Mississippi: The Examiner Printing Company. p. 1 via Newspapers.com.
  7. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved November 9, 2019.
  8. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  9. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  10. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  11. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  12. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  13. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-05.

Coordinates: 33°53′N88°29′W / 33.89°N 88.49°W / 33.89; -88.49