Noxubee County, Mississippi

Last updated
Noxubee County
Macon-ms-noxubee-courthouse.jpg
Noxubee County courthouse in Macon
Map of Mississippi highlighting Noxubee County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Mississippi
Mississippi in United States.svg
Mississippi's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 33°07′N88°34′W / 33.11°N 88.57°W / 33.11; -88.57
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Mississippi.svg  Mississippi
Founded1833
Seat Macon
Largest cityMacon
Area
  Total700 sq mi (2,000 km2)
  Land695 sq mi (1,800 km2)
  Water4.8 sq mi (12 km2)  0.7%
Population
 (2010)
  Total11,545
  Estimate 
(2018)
10,535
  Density16/sq mi (6.4/km2)
Time zone UTC−6 (Central)
  Summer (DST) UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district 3rd

Noxubee County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 11,545. [1] Its county seat is Macon. [2] The name is derived from the Choctaw word nakshobi meaning to stink. [3]

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, a county is an administrative or political subdivision of a state that consists of a geographic region with specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs, respectively.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders.

Mississippi State in the United States

Mississippi is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. Mississippi is the 32nd largest and 34th-most populous of the 50 United States. Mississippi is bordered to the north by Tennessee, to the east by Alabama, to the south by the Gulf of Mexico, to the southwest by Louisiana, and to the northwest by Arkansas. Mississippi's western boundary is largely defined by the Mississippi River. Jackson is both the state's capital and largest city. Greater Jackson, with an estimated population of 580,166 in 2018, is the most populous metropolitan area in Mississippi and the 95th-most populous in the United States.

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 700 square miles (1,800 km2), of which 695 square miles (1,800 km2) is land and 4.8 square miles (12 km2) (0.7%) is water. [4]

Major highways

Mississippi Highway 14 is a 139.332-mile-long (224.233 km) state highway that runs from west to east in the U.S. State of Mississippi. MS 14 serves the counties of Issaquena, Sharkey, Humphreys, Holmes, Attala, Winston, and Noxubee. MS 14 exists in two sections. The first section runs from west to east, beginning at River Road in Mayersville and ending at a junction with MS 149 near Louise. The second section begins at Ebenezer Coxburg Road / Ebenezer Road in Ebenezer and runs eastward to the Mississippi/Alabama state line near Macon where it continues as Alabama State Route 32.

Mississippi Highway 21 highway in Mississippi

Mississippi Highway 21 is a state highway in Mississippi. It runs from north to south for 73.5 miles (118.3 km) and serves six counties: Scott, Leake, Newton, Neshoba, Kemper, and Noxubee.

Mississippi Highway 39 is a south to north highway that is 49.8 miles (80.1 km) long, between Meridian, MS and Shuqualak, MS.

Adjacent counties

Lowndes County, Mississippi U.S. county in Mississippi

Lowndes County is a county located on the eastern border of the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 59,779. Its county seat is Columbus. The county is named for U.S. Congressman William Jones Lowndes.

Pickens County, Alabama U.S. county in Alabama

Pickens County is a county located on the west central border of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 19,746. Its county seat is Carrollton, located in the center of the county. It is a prohibition, or dry county, although the communities of Carrollton and Aliceville voted to become wet in 2011 and 2012, respectively.

Sumter County, Alabama U.S. county in Alabama

Sumter County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 13,763. Its county seat is Livingston. Its name is in honor of General Thomas Sumter of South Carolina.

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1840 9,975
1850 16,29963.4%
1860 20,66726.8%
1870 20,9051.2%
1880 29,87442.9%
1890 27,338−8.5%
1900 30,84612.8%
1910 28,503−7.6%
1920 23,710−16.8%
1930 25,5607.8%
1940 25,6690.4%
1950 20,022−22.0%
1960 16,826−16.0%
1970 14,288−15.1%
1980 13,212−7.5%
1990 12,604−4.6%
2000 12,548−0.4%
2010 11,545−8.0%
Est. 201810,535 [5] −8.7%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1790-1960 [7] 1900-1990 [8]
1990-2000 [9] 2010-2013 [1]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 11,545 people residing in the county. 71.6% were Black or African American, 27.1% White, 0.2% Asian, 0.2% Native American, 0.4% of some other race and 0.5% of two or more races. 0.8% were Hispanic or Latino (of any race).

2010 United States Census 23rd national census of the United States, taken in 2010

The 2010 United States Census is the twenty-third and most recent United States national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010. The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired. The population of the United States was counted as 308,745,538, a 9.7% increase from the 2000 Census. This was the first census in which all states recorded a population of over half a million people as well as the first in which all 100 largest cities recorded populations of over 200,000.

Native Americans in the United States Indigenous peoples of the United States (except Hawaii)

Native Americans, also known as American Indians, Indigenous Americans and other terms, are the indigenous peoples of the United States, except Hawaii and territories of the United States. More than 570 federally recognized tribes live within the US, about half of which are associated with Indian reservations. The term "American Indian" excludes Native Hawaiians and some Alaskan Natives, while "Native Americans" are American Indians, plus Alaska Natives of all ethnicities. The US Census does not include Native Hawaiians or Chamorro, instead being included in the Census grouping of "Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander".

Hispanic Americans are Americans who are descendants of people from Spain or Spanish America. More generally, it includes all Americans who speak the Spanish language natively, and who self-identify as Hispanic, whether of full or partial ancestry. For the 2010 United States Census, people counted as "Hispanic" or "Latino" were those who identified as one of the specific Hispanic or Latino categories listed on the census questionnaire as well as those who indicated that they were "other Spanish, Hispanic or Latino." The national origins classified as Hispanic or Latino by the United States Census Bureau are the following: Argentine, Cuban, Colombian, Peruvian, Puerto Rican, Dominican, Mexican, Costa Rican, Guatemalan, Honduran, Nicaraguan, Panamanian, Salvadoran, Bolivian, Spanish American, Chilean, Ecuadorian, Paraguayan, Uruguayan, and Venezuelan. Brazilian Americans, other Portuguese-speaking Latin American groups, and non-Spanish speaking Latin American groups in the United States are solely defined as "Latino" by some U.S. government agencies. The Census Bureau uses the terms Hispanic and Latino interchangeably.

As of the census [10] of 2000, there were 12,548 people, 4,470 households, and 3,222 families residing in the county. The population density was 18 people per square mile (7/km²). There were 5,228 housing units at an average density of 8 per square mile (3/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 69.30% Black, 29.49% White, 0.15% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.37% from other races, and 0.58% from two or more races. 1.12% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Census Acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population

A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. This term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include traditional culture, business, supplies, and traffic censuses. The United Nations defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every ten years. United Nations recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practices.

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area, or exceptionally unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

There were 4,470 households, out of which 35.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.00% were married couples living together, 24.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.90% were non-families. 25.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.36.

In the county, the population was spread out with 30.70% under the age of 18, 10.30% from 18 to 24, 26.70% from 25 to 44, 19.50% from 45 to 64, and 12.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 90.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $22,330, and the median income for a family was $27,312. Males had a median income of $25,008 versus $17,636 for females. The per capita income for the county was $12,018. About 29.20% of families and 32.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 43.60% of those under age 18 and 25.30% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Public elementary and secondary education is administered by the Noxubee County School District.

Noxubee County is within the service area of the East Mississippi Community College system. [11] The system offers classes in the Macon Extension at Noxubee County High School in Macon. [12]

At one time, many more schools existed within the county. In the early twentieth century, nineteen of these were consolidated into two districts consisting of six schools, which were Salem, Lynn Creek, Center Point, Cliftonville, Cooksville-Paulette, Mashulaville, and Brooksville. The old Salem School was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1989. [13] The Noxubee County Agricultural School at Mashulaville opened in 1910 and included a forty acre farm and provided living arrangements for up to 40 boarding students. [14]

The public school population is 1% white, compared to 27% of the county population. [15] Central Academy in Macon, which was founded in 1968 as a segregation academy, [16] , closed in 2017. In 1982, private deals that had been made between board members to use public funds to aid Central Academy became public. As a result, the NAACP called for the resignation of all Noxubee county school board members who had knowledge of the board’s aid to Central Academy, which at the time did not enroll any black students. [17]

United States v. Ike Brown

In 2005, the U.S. Department of Justice began an investigation and the following year filed suit under the Voting Rights Act alleging that the chairman of the Noxubee County Democratic Party, Ike Brown, had conspired to orchestrate "relentless racial discrimination" against white voters. [18] [19]

The court ruled that Brown, in conjunction with the Noxubee Democratic Executive Committee, had "manipulated the political process in ways specifically intended and designed to impair and impede participation of white voters and to dilute their votes". [18] This was the first time the voting rights act of 1965 had been used to allege discrimination against whites. [20]

Communities

City

Towns

Unincorporated communities

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved September 4, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. Byington, Cyrus (1909). Choctaw Language Dictionary. Global Bible Society.
  4. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 28, 2013. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  5. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved November 9, 2019.
  6. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  7. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  8. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  9. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  10. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  11. "CATALOG 2007-09 Archived 2010-12-18 at the Wayback Machine , eastms.edu. 3 (3/147); retrieved March 1, 2011.
  12. CATALOG 2007-09, eastms.edu, 10 (10/147) Archived 2010-12-18 at the Wayback Machine ; retrieved on March 1, 2011.
  13. "STORES OF THE SOUTH - OLD SALEM SCHOOL" . Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  14. "The Mashulaville School". Macon Beacon. 11 August 1911. Retrieved 18 December 2017.
  15. "2006-07 State, District, and School Enrollment by Race/Gender with Poverty Data" (XLS). Mississippi Department of Education. 2008-01-16. Retrieved 2008-05-18.[ dead link ]
  16. Bolton, Charles C. (2005). The Hardest Deal of All. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi. ISBN   9781578067176.
  17. "Schools board member resigns before NAACP asks". Clarksdale Press-Register. May 19, 1982. p. 11.
  18. 1 2 Nossiter, Adam (2006-10-11). "U.S. Says Blacks in Mississippi Suppress White Vote". The New York Times.
  19. Shapiro, Ari (2005-11-14). "White Voters in Mississippi Allege Voting Discrimination" (audio). National Public Radio.
  20. "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA V. IKE BROWN NOXUBEE COUNTY DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE" . Retrieved 28 November 2017.

Coordinates: 33°07′N88°34′W / 33.11°N 88.57°W / 33.11; -88.57