Timeline of Leicester

Last updated

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Leicester , England.

Contents

Prehistoric & Roman Eras

Medieval Era

16th–18th centuries

19th century

[7]

20th century

21st century

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Market Harborough</span> Town in Leicestershire, England

Market Harborough is a market town in the Harborough district of Leicestershire, England, close to the border with Northamptonshire. The population was 24,779 at the 2021 census. It is the administrative headquarters of the Harborough district.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Nuneaton</span> Market town in Warwickshire, England

Nuneaton is a market town in Warwickshire, England, close to the county border with Leicestershire to the north-east. Nuneaton's population at the 2021 census was 88,813, making it the largest town in Warwickshire. Nuneaton's urban area, which also includes the large villages of Bulkington and Hartshill, had a population of 99,372 at the 2021 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Evington</span> Human settlement in England

Evington is an area of Leicester, and electoral ward of the Leicester district, in the ceremonial county of Leicestershire, England. It used to be a small village centred on Main Street and the Anglican church of St Denys but was close enough to Leicester to become one of the outer suburbs in the 1930s. Today, the ward comprises the historical village of Evington, as well as the modern ex-council estates of Rowlatts Hill and Goodwood. The population of the ward at the 2011 census was 11,133.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Oadby</span> Town in Leicestershire, England

Oadby is a town in the borough of Oadby and Wigston in Leicestershire, England. Oadby is a district centre 4 miles (6.4 km) south-east of Leicester on the A6 road. Leicester Racecourse is situated on the border between Oadby and Stoneygate. The University of Leicester Botanical Garden is in Oadby. Oadby had a population of 23,849 in 2011, and like its neighbour Wigston is made up of five wards. The Borough of Oadby and Wigston is twinned with Maromme in France, and Norderstedt in Germany.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Knighton, Leicester</span> Area of Leicester, England

Knighton is a residential suburban area of Leicester, England. It situated between Clarendon Park to the north, Stoneygate to the east, Oadby and Wigston to the south and the Saffron Lane estate to the west.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">History of Leicestershire</span>

This article is intended to give an overview of the history of Leicestershire.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Thurnby</span> Human settlement in England

Thurnby is a village and former civil parish, now in the parish of Thurnby and Bushby, in the Harborough district, in the county of Leicestershire, England. It is just east of Leicester's city boundaries.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Knaptoft</span> Human settlement in England

Knaptoft is a deserted medieval village and civil parish in the Harborough district of Leicestershire and lies approximately 9.7 miles (15.6 km) south of the city of Leicester, England. According to the University of Nottingham English Place-names project, the settlement name Knaptoft could mean "cnafa" for 'a boy, a young man, a servant, a menial, or a personal name' and 'toft', the plot of ground in which a dwelling stands. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 census was 47.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Stockerston</span>

Stockerston is a village and civil parish in the Harborough district of Leicestershire, England, located on the border with Rutland, by the Eye Brook. According to the 2001 census the parish had a population of 35. The population remained less than 100 at the 2011 census and is included in the civil parish of Horninghold.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Frisby, Leicestershire</span> Human settlement in England

Frisby is a hamlet and civil parish in the Harborough district of Leicestershire that lies approximately 7.3 miles (11.7 km) southeast of the city of Leicester, that is now largely a deserted medieval village. According to the University of Nottingham English Place-names project, the settlement name Frisby could mean 'farm/settlement of the Frisians'. The 2011 census for Frisby returned 5 houses and 16 residents. Often termed as Frisby by Gaulby, the modern hamlet is situated between the village of Gaulby 1 mile (1.6 km) to the southwest and Billesdon 1.94 miles (3.12 km) to the northeast. The deserted part of the ancient hamlet is a Scheduled Ancient Monument and can be located on the eastern side of the lane that leads down the hill from Gaulby Road, via Frisby House on a south-eastwards direction. The earthwork "tofts & crofts" are still visible today, with foundations for two stone built buildings noted towards the center of the site.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Woodgate, Leicester</span> Neighbourhood in Englands East Midlands

Woodgate is an area in Leicester in Fosse Ward. It lies west of the River Soar and is an important entrance to the city leading on to Frog Island. Its western end lies at the 'Fiveways Junction, an intersection of Fosse Road North, Groby Road, Blackbird Road and Buckminster Road. To the south is the Rally Park, which was formerly the goods yard of the London Midland Railway, and originally the route of the Leicester to Swannington Railway built by Robert Stephenson in 1832. To the west is Fosse Road North. At its eastern end Woodgate terminates at the North Bridge over the old River Soar.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Wistow, Leicestershire</span> Human settlement in England

Wistow is a deserted medieval village and civil parish in the Harborough district, in the English county of Leicestershire, and lies seven miles south-east of the city of Leicester in the valley of the River Sence. Since 1 April 1936 it has included most of the former civil parish of Newton Harcourt which was a chapelry of Wistow. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 census was 256.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Gilmorton</span> Human settlement in England

Gilmorton is a village and civil parish about 3 miles (5 km) northeast of Lutterworth in Leicestershire, England. The 2011 Census recorded the parish population as 976.

Newfoundpool is an area of Leicester lying south of the former Leicester and Swannington Railway. The land was purchased by market gardener Isaac Harrison in around 1830. Harrison intended to develop the area as a spa, using a spring as the source of water for a Hydrotherapy and bathing establishment, but the venture failed after a few years. Later the building was converted into a residence, Newfoundpool House, in which successive members of the Harrison family lived until 1885, with the land passing to Harrison's nephew, also named Isaac, and then his daughter Beatrice. The house became the Empire Hotel on Fosse Road North.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Saddington</span> Human settlement in England

Saddington is a village in the Harborough district of Leicestershire, England. It is close to Smeeton Westerby, Gumley, Kibworth and Fleckney. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 census was 309.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Little Stretton, Leicestershire</span> Village in Leicestershire, England

Little Stretton is a small village and civil parish in the Harborough district of Leicestershire that lies approximately 5.53 miles (8.90 km) southeast of the city of Leicester. The parish includes the deserted medieval village of Great Stretton, a Scheduled Ancient Monument that is located 0.7 miles (1.1 km) to the west of the village. The Gartree Road, a Roman Road, runs through the parish, adjacent to both Little and Great Stretton, and is the reason for those settlements' names. According to the University of Nottingham English Place-names project, the settlement name Stretton means "strēt" (Anglian) for a Roman road; and "tūn" for a settlement or an estate. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 census was 92, with approximately 36 households.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Shangton</span> Village in Leicestershire, England

Shangton is a parish and village 1 mile (2 km) north of Tur Langton in Leicestershire, England. The parish is part of the Harborough district. According to the University of Nottingham English Place-names project, the settlement name Shangton could mean 'shank farm/settlement', a long, narrow bent piece of ground; a narrow ridge or 'shank' projecting from high ground beside the village. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 census was approximately 125.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">St Margaret's Church, Leicester</span> Church

St Margaret's Church is an ancient Anglican parish church situated on St Margaret's Way in Leicester, England. It is a Grade I listed building.

The identification of Deserted Villages and Lost Places in Leicestershire owes much to the pioneering work of William George Hoskins during his time at the University of Leicester.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Blackfriars, Leicester</span> Former priory of the Order of Preachers in Leicester, England

Blackfriars Leicester, also known as St Clement's Church, Leicester and St Clement's Priory, Leicester, is a former priory of the Order of Preachers in Leicester, England. It is also the name of a former civic parish, and a neighbourhood in the city built on and around the site of the old priory.

References

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Further reading

Published in the 19th century

1800s–1840s

1850s–1890s

Published in the 20th century

52°38′00″N1°08′00″W / 52.633333°N 1.133333°W / 52.633333; -1.133333