Timeline of Oxford

Last updated

The following is a timeline of the history of the city, university and colleges of Oxford, England.

Contents

Pre-history

Recorded history before 12th century

City coat of arms in Town Hall Oxford coat of arms 20050303.jpg
City coat of arms in Town Hall
University seal Oxford-University-Circlet.svg
University seal

12th century

St George's Tower of the Castle Oxford Castle.JPG
St George's Tower of the Castle
"Friar Bacon's Study" at Folly Bridge, demolished 1779 Roger Bacons Study in Oxford.jpg
"Friar Bacon's Study" at Folly Bridge, demolished 1779

13th century

14th century

Merton College's Mob Quad Mob Quad from Chapel Tower.jpg
Merton College's Mob Quad
Adam de Brome, founder of Oriel College Adam de Brome.jpg
Adam de Brome, founder of Oriel College

15th century

New College Dining Hall New College, Oxford (3915166725).jpg
New College Dining Hall

16th century

Magdalen Tower from Magdalen Bridge Snow Magdalen Bridge.jpg
Magdalen Tower from Magdalen Bridge
Christ Church Christ Church Great Quadrangle 03.JPG
Christ Church

17th century

Old Schools Quadrangle, Bodleian Library The Bodleian Library from the south entrance.jpg
Old Schools Quadrangle, Bodleian Library
Brasenose in c.1674, from Loggan's Oxonia Illustrata Brasenose College from Loggan's Oxonia Illustrata.jpg
Brasenose in c.1674, from Loggan's Oxonia Illustrata

18th century

Broad Street looking east towards (right to left) the Old Ashmolean Building, the Sheldonian Theatre and the Clarendon Building Old Ashmolean.gif
Broad Street looking east towards (right to left) the Old Ashmolean Building, the Sheldonian Theatre and the Clarendon Building
Radcliffe Camera Radcliffe Camera, Oxford - Oct 2006.jpg
Radcliffe Camera

19th century

University Museum Oxf-uni-mus-nhi.jpg
University Museum
On the river - an early view 1822 Oxford Eights cropped.jpg
On the river – an early view
The Dodo (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland) Alice par John Tenniel 09.png
The Dodo (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland)
Keble College Chapel Keble College Chapel - Oct 2006.jpg
Keble College Chapel
First two women's colleges
The High - Photochrom of c.1900 High Street, Oxford, England, 1890s.jpg
The HighPhotochrom of c.1900

20th century

1913 "Bullnose" Morris Oxford MHV Morris Oxford 1913 (filtered).jpg
1913 "Bullnose" Morris Oxford
Salters steamer Wargrave (1913) by Folly Bridge Salters Steamers by Folly Bridge.jpg
Salters steamer Wargrave (1913) by Folly Bridge
North Oxford home, successively of Basil Blackwell and J. R. R. Tolkien (20 Northmoor Road) 20 Northmoor Road, Oxford.JPG
North Oxford home, successively of Basil Blackwell and J. R. R. Tolkien (20 Northmoor Road)
Wartime aircraft scrap dump at Cowley as portrayed in Paul Nash's Totes Meer Totes Meer (Dead Sea) 1940-1 Paul Nash.jpg
Wartime aircraft scrap dump at Cowley as portrayed in Paul Nash's Totes Meer
St Giles' Fair St Giles Fair in Oxford - geograph.org.uk - 1491678.jpg
St Giles' Fair
Oxford's dreaming spires from South Park South Park Oxford snow.jpg
Oxford's dreaming spires from South Park
Port Meadow Port Meadow sunset.jpg
Port Meadow

21st century

Mathematical Institute with Penrose tiling and a glimpse of the Radcliffe Observatory The Mathematical Institute at Oxford University.jpg
Mathematical Institute with Penrose tiling and a glimpse of the Radcliffe Observatory

Births

Jane Burden sketched by William Morris Jane Burden at 18 by William Morris.jpg
Jane Burden sketched by William Morris

Deaths

Osney Cemetery (on the site of the Abbey) Osney cemetery - geograph.org.uk - 1263022.jpg
Osney Cemetery (on the site of the Abbey)

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Oxford</span> City in Oxfordshire, England

Oxford is the only city in Oxfordshire, England, of which it is the county town. It had a population of 162,100 at the 2021 census. It is 56 miles (90 km) north-west of London, 64 miles (103 km) south-east of Birmingham and 61 miles (98 km) north-east of Bristol. The city is home to the University of Oxford, the oldest university in the English-speaking world; it has buildings in every style of English architecture since late Anglo-Saxon. Oxford's industries include motor manufacturing, education, publishing, information technology and science.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">University of Oxford</span> Collegiate university in Oxford, England

The University of Oxford is a collegiate research university in Oxford, England. There is evidence of teaching as early as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's second-oldest university in continuous operation. It grew rapidly from 1167, when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris. After disputes between students and Oxford townsfolk in 1209, some academics fled north-east to Cambridge where they established what became the University of Cambridge. The two English ancient universities share many common features and are jointly referred to as Oxbridge.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Radcliffe Camera</span> University library building in Oxford, United Kingdom

The Radcliffe Camera is a building of the University of Oxford, England, designed by James Gibbs in a Baroque style and built in 1737–49 to house the Radcliffe Science Library. It is sited to the south of the Old Bodleian, north of the Church of St Mary the Virgin, and between Brasenose College to the west and All Souls College to the east. The Radcliffe Camera's circularity, its position in the heart of Oxford, and its separation from other buildings make it the focal point of the University of Oxford, and as such it is almost always included in shorthand visual representations of the university. The Radcliffe Camera is not open to the public.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bodleian Library</span> Research library of the University of Oxford

The Bodleian Library is the main research library of the University of Oxford, and is one of the oldest libraries in Europe. It derives its name from its founder, Sir Thomas Bodley. With over 13 million printed items, it is the second-largest library in Britain after the British Library. Under the Legal Deposit Libraries Act 2003, it is one of six legal deposit libraries for works published in the United Kingdom, and under Irish law it is entitled to request a copy of each book published in the Republic of Ireland. Known to Oxford scholars as "Bodley" or "the Bod", it operates principally as a reference library and, in general, documents may not be removed from the reading rooms.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Magdalen College, Oxford</span> College of the University of Oxford

Magdalen College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford. It was founded in 1458 by Bishop of Winchester William of Waynflete. It is one of the wealthiest Oxford colleges, as of 2022, and one of the strongest academically, setting the record for the highest Norrington Score in 2010 and topping the table twice since then. It is home to several of the university's distinguished chairs, including the Agnelli-Serena Professorship, the Sherardian Professorship, and the four Waynflete Professorships.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Hertford College, Oxford</span> College of the University of Oxford

Hertford College, previously known as Magdalen Hall, is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England. It is located on Catte Street in the centre of Oxford, directly opposite the main gate to the Bodleian Library. The college is known for its iconic bridge, the Bridge of Sighs. There are around 600 students at the college at any one time, comprising undergraduates, graduates and visiting students from overseas.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Merton College, Oxford</span> College of the University of Oxford

Merton College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. Its foundation can be traced back to the 1260s when Walter de Merton, chancellor to Henry III and later to Edward I, first drew up statutes for an independent academic community and established endowments to support it. An important feature of de Merton's foundation was that this "college" was to be self-governing and the endowments were directly vested in the Warden and Fellows.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">St Catherine's College, Oxford</span> College of the University of Oxford

St Catherine's College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford. In 1974, it was also one of the first men's colleges to admit women. It has 528 undergraduate students, 385 graduate students and 37 visiting students as of December 2020, making it one of the largest colleges in either Oxford or Cambridge.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Colleges of the University of Oxford</span>

The University of Oxford has thirty-nine colleges, and four permanent private halls (PPHs) of religious foundation. Colleges and PPHs are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university. These colleges are not only houses of residence, but have substantial responsibility for teaching undergraduate students. Generally tutorials and classes are the responsibility of colleges, while lectures, examinations, laboratories, and the central library are run by the university. Students normally have most of their tutorials in their own college, but often have a couple of modules taught at other colleges or even at faculties and departments. Most colleges take both graduates and undergraduates, but several are for graduates only.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Arthur Blomfield</span> English architect (1829–1899)

Sir Arthur William Blomfield was an English architect. He became president of the Architectural Association in 1861; a Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1867 and vice-president of the RIBA in 1886. He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he studied Architecture.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">High Street, Oxford</span> Street in Oxford, England

The High Street in Oxford, England, known locally as the High, runs between Carfax, generally seen as the centre of the city, and Magdalen Bridge to the east.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Broad Street, Oxford</span> Street in central Oxford, England

Broad Street is a wide street in central Oxford, England, just north of the former city wall. The street is known for its bookshops, including the original Blackwell's bookshop at number 50, located here due to the University of Oxford. Among residents, the street is traditionally known as The Broad.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Radcliffe Science Library</span> Library of the University of Oxford

The Radcliffe Science Library (RSL) is the main teaching and research science library at the University of Oxford in Oxford, England. Being officially part of the Bodleian Libraries, the library holds the Legal Deposit material for the sciences and is thus entitled to receive a copy of all British scientific publications.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Catte Street</span> Street in central Oxford, England

Catte Street is a historic street in central Oxford, England.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Radcliffe Infirmary</span> Hospital in England

The Radcliffe Infirmary was a hospital in central north Oxford, England, located at the southern end of Woodstock Road on the western side, backing onto Walton Street.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Milham Ford School</span> Community school in Oxford, United Kingdom

Milham Ford School was a girls' secondary school in Oxford, England, located in the suburb of New Marston on Marston Road. It was founded in East Oxford in the 1880s and closed in 2003.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">John Chessell Buckler</span> British architect (1793–1894)

John Chessell Buckler was a British architect, the eldest son of the architect John Buckler. J. C. Buckler initially worked with his father before taking over his practice. His work included restorations of country houses and at the University of Oxford.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Taynton, Oxfordshire</span> Human settlement in England

Taynton is a village and civil parish about 1+12 miles (2.4 km) northwest of Burford in West Oxfordshire. The village is on Coombe Brook, a tributary of the River Windrush. The parish is bounded in the south by the River Windrush, in the north partly by Coombe Brook and its tributary Hazelden Brook, in the west by the county boundary with Gloucestershire and in the east by field boundaries. The 2001 Census recorded the parish's population as 108.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bodleian Libraries</span> Group of research libraries at the University of Oxford

The Bodleian Libraries are a collection of 28 libraries that serve the University of Oxford in England, including the Bodleian Library itself, as well as many other central and faculty libraries. As of the 2021-2022 report year, the libraries collectively hold 13.5 million printed items, as well as numerous other objects and artefacts.

Lettering and Sculpture Limited is a sculpture studio in Ducklington, Oxfordshire. It was incorporated in 2008, and the directors are sculptors Alec and Fiona Peever, a married couple who create art in collaboration with each other, with other sculptors, and with writers. Before and during the life of this company, the two sculptors have shown work at many art exhibitions, executed many commissions, supported several institutions, and won several awards.

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