Social philosophy

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Social philosophy is the study of questions about social behavior and interpretations of society and social institutions in terms of ethical values rather than empirical relations. [1] Social philosophers place new emphasis on understanding the social contexts for political, legal, moral, and cultural questions, and to the development of novel theoretical frameworks, from social ontology to care ethics to cosmopolitan theories of democracy, human rights, gender equity and global justice. [2]

Contents

Subdisciplines

There is often a considerable overlap between the questions addressed by social philosophy and ethics or value theory. Other forms of social philosophy include political philosophy and jurisprudence, which are largely concerned with the societies of state and government and their functioning.

Social philosophy, ethics, and political philosophy all share intimate connections with other disciplines in the social sciences. In turn, the social sciences themselves are of focal interest to the philosophy of social science.

The philosophy of language and social epistemology are subfields which overlap in significant ways with social philosophy. [3]

Relevant issues

Some topics dealt with by social philosophy are:

Social philosophers

A list of philosophers that have concerned themselves, although most of them not exclusively, with social philosophy:

See also

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Articles in social and political philosophy include:

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An index list of articles about the philosophy of science.

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References

  1. "Definition of SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY".
  2. "Overview - Journal of Social Philosophy - Wiley Online Library". onlinelibrary.wiley.com. doi:10.1111/(issn)1467-9833/homepage/productinformation (inactive 2019-12-03).
  3. "Social Philosophy". Cavite State University Main Campus.