Capitol Police Board

Last updated

The Capitol Police Board is the body that governs the United States Capitol Police. It was established in 1873, [1] and today consists of three voting members: the Sergeant at Arms of the United States House of Representatives, the Sergeant at Arms of the United States Senate, and the Architect of the Capitol. Additionally, the Chief of the Capitol Police serves ex officio as a non-voting member. [2] The Chairmanship of the board alternates annually between the House and Senate Sergeants at Arms. [2]

Related Research Articles

Quorum Minimum number of members of a deliberative assembly necessary to conduct business

A quorum is the minimum number of members of a deliberative assembly necessary to conduct the business of that group. According to Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised, the "requirement for a quorum is protection against totally unrepresentative action in the name of the body by an unduly small number of persons." In contrast, a plenum is a meeting of the full body.

A serjeant-at-arms, or sergeant-at-arms, is an officer appointed by a deliberative body, usually a legislature, to keep order during its meetings. The word "serjeant" is derived from the Latin serviens, which means "servant". Historically, serjeants-at-arms were armed men retained by English lords and monarchs, and the ceremonial maces with which they are associated were in origin a type of weapon.

Virginia General Assembly Legislative body of Virginia, United States

The Virginia General Assembly is the legislative body of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the oldest continuous law-making body in the New World, established on July 30, 1619. The General Assembly is a bicameral body consisting of a lower house, the Virginia House of Delegates, with 100 members, and an upper house, the Senate of Virginia, with 40 members. Combined together, the General Assembly consists of 140 elected representatives from an equal number of constituent districts across the commonwealth. The House of Delegates is presided over by the Speaker of the House, while the Senate is presided over by the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia. The House and Senate each elect a clerk and sergeant-at-arms. The Senate of Virginia's clerk is known as the "Clerk of the Senate".

Michigan House of Representatives Lower state chamber of Michigan

The Michigan House of Representatives is the lower house of the Michigan Legislature. There are 110 members, each of whom is elected from constituencies having approximately 77,000 to 91,000 residents, based on population figures from the 2010 U.S. Census. Its composition, powers and duties are established in Article IV of the Michigan Constitution.

Hawaii Senate

The Hawaii Senate is the upper house of the Hawaii State Legislature. It consists of twenty-five members elected from an equal number of constituent districts across the islands and is led by the President of the Senate, elected from the membership of the body, currently Ron Kouchi. The forerunner of the Hawaii Senate during the government of the Kingdom of Hawaii was the House of Nobles originated in 1840. In 1894, the Constitution of the Republic of Hawaii renamed the upper house the present senate. Senators are elected to four-year terms and are not subject to term limits.

Architect of the Capitol Person and federal agency that maintains the United States Capitol Complex

The Architect of the Capitol (AOC) is the federal agency responsible for the maintenance, operation, development, and preservation of the United States Capitol Complex. It is an agency of the legislative branch of the federal government and is accountable to the United States Congress and the Supreme Court. The head of the agency is also called "Architect of the Capitol".

Illinois Senate

The Illinois Senate is the upper chamber of the Illinois General Assembly, the legislative branch of the government of the State of Illinois in the United States. The body was created by the first state constitution adopted in 1818. Under the Illinois Constitution of 1970, the Illinois Senate is made up of 59 senators elected from individual legislative districts determined by population and redistricted every 10 years; based on the 2010 U.S. census each senator represents approximately 217,468 people. Senators are divided into three groups, each group having a two-year term at a different part of the decade between censuses, with the rest of the decade being taken up by two four-year terms. This ensures that the Senate reflects changes made when the General Assembly redistricts itself after each census.

The Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper of the United States Senate is the highest-ranking federal law enforcement officer in the Senate of the United States. The Sergeant at Arms is also the executive officer for the Senate and provides senators with computers, equipment, and repair and security services. The office of the Sergeant at Arms of the Senate has between 800 and 900 staff.

In the Congress of the United States, a closed session is a parliamentary procedure for the Senate or the House of Representatives to discuss matters requiring secrecy.

The Sergeant at Arms of the United States House of Representatives is an officer of the House with law enforcement, protocol, and administrative responsibilities. The Sergeant at Arms is elected at the beginning of each Congress by the membership of the House.

The Capitol Guide Board was a group of three members who have jurisdiction over the United States Capitol Guide Service. The three members of this board were the Architect of the Capitol Stephen T. Ayers, the Senate Sergeant at Arms Frank J. Larkin, and the House Sergeant at Arms Paul D. Irving. The title holders of these positions make up the Capitol Police Board, which has jurisdiction over the United States Capitol Police. The board was abolished in 2008.

United States Capitol Guide Service

The United States Capitol Guide Service was a guide service charged by the United States Congress to "provide guided tours of the interior of the United States Capitol Building for the education and enlightenment of the general public, without charge for such tours." It existed under 2 U.S.C. § 2166.

Nevada Senate Upper house of the Nevada Legislature

The Nevada Senate is the upper house of the Nevada Legislature, the state legislature of U.S. state of Nevada, the lower house being the Nevada Assembly. It currently (2012–2021) consists of 21 members from single-member districts. In the previous redistricting (2002–2011) there were 19 districts, two of which were multimember. Since 2012, there have been 21 districts, each formed by combining two neighboring state assembly districts. Each State Senator represented approximately 128,598 as of the 2010 United States Census. Article Four of the Constitution of Nevada sets that State Senators serve staggered four-year terms.

Terrance W. Gainer

Terrance William Gainer is a former law enforcement officer and was the 38th Sergeant at Arms of the United States Senate and served in that position from January 4, 2007 to May 2, 2014.

Mace of the United States House of Representatives

The Mace of the United States House of Representatives also called the Mace of the Republic, is a ceremonial mace and one of the oldest symbols of the United States government. It symbolizes the governmental authority of the United States, and more specifically, the legislative authority of the House of Representatives.

Paul D. Irving

Paul Douglas Irving is an American law enforcement officer who served as the Sergeant at Arms of the United States House of Representatives from January 17, 2012 until January 7, 2021, succeeding Wilson Livingood in that post. He resigned following the 2021 storming of the United States Capitol.

117th United States Congress 2021–2023 meeting of U.S. legislature

The 117th United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives. It convened in Washington, D.C., on January 3, 2021, during the final weeks of Donald Trump's presidency, and will end on January 3, 2023. It will meet during the first two years of Joe Biden's presidency.

Hideaway (U.S. Senate) secret offices used by members of the United States Senate

The United States Senate's hideaways are about 100 "secret" offices in the U.S. Capitol building used by members of the Senate, and by a few senior members of the U.S. House of Representatives. Their locations are unlisted in any official directory and their doors are marked only by a room number. Hideaways are used by senators as a private space in which to prepare for sessions of the Senate, to conduct confidential meetings, to take naps, and for other personal purposes. They range from lavish and expansive upper-floor offices to small, cramped offices in the basement. Hideaways are assigned to senators based on seniority. The history of hideaways dates to the earliest occupancy of the U.S. Capitol in 1800. However, they proliferated in the early 20th century.

Michael C. Stenger former Sergeant at Arms of the U.S. Senate

Michael C. Stenger is an American law enforcement officer who served as the 41st Sergeant at Arms of the United States Senate from April 16, 2018 until his resignation after the 2021 storming of the United States Capitol by supporters of President Donald Trump.

Jennifer Hemingway is an American federal law enforcement officer and former political advisor serving as the acting Sergeant at Arms of the United States Senate.

References

  1. "History". United States Capitol Police. Retrieved 19 January 2020.
  2. 1 2 "Capitol Police Board". United States Capitol Police. Retrieved 19 January 2020.