Norwood, Massachusetts

Last updated
Norwood, Massachusetts
Hartshornmarket.jpg
Hartshorn's Market c. 1920. Behind it are the United Church of Norwood and (faintly) St. Catherine's Church, both still standing
NorwoodMA-seal.png
Norfolk County Massachusetts incorporated and unincorporated areas Norwood highlighted.svg
Location in Norfolk County in Massachusetts
Coordinates: 42°11′40″N71°12′00″W / 42.19444°N 71.20000°W / 42.19444; -71.20000 Coordinates: 42°11′40″N71°12′00″W / 42.19444°N 71.20000°W / 42.19444; -71.20000
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
State Flag of Massachusetts.svg  Massachusetts
County Flag of Norfolk County, Massachusetts.gif Norfolk
Settled1678
Incorporated1872
Government
  Type Representative town meeting
Area
  Total27.3 km2 (10.6 sq mi)
  Land27.1 km2 (10.5 sq mi)
  Water0.2 km2 (0.1 sq mi)
Elevation
45 m (146 ft)
Population
 (2020)
  Total31,611
  Density1,166.5/km2 (3,010.6/sq mi)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (Eastern)
ZIP Code
02062
Area code(s) 339 / 781
FIPS code 25-50250
GNIS feature ID0619460
Website www.norwoodma.gov

Norwood is a town and census-designated place in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. Norwood is part of the Greater Boston area. As of the 2020 census, the population was 31,611. [1] The town was named after Norwood, England. Norwood is on the Neponset River, [2] which runs all the way to Boston Harbor from Foxborough.

Contents

History

The Town of Norwood, officially formed in 1872, was until that time part of Dedham, known as the "mother of towns", as fourteen of the present communities of eastern Massachusetts lay within its original borders. Long used as a hunting ground by Native Americans, Norwood was first settled by Ezra Morse in 1678.[ citation needed ] He set up a sawmill in what is now South Norwood, the part of town to which the first concentration of families, almost all of whom were farmers, migrated over the next half-century.

During the American Revolution, there was a Minuteman company organized in the area. Its captain, Aaron Guild, on learning of the British marching on Lexington and Concord to seize the munitions stored there, rode to join the fight and arrived in time to fire on the British at Concord Bridge and participate in the running battle that chased the Redcoats back to Boston.

Abraham Lincoln passed through the town during his pre-inaugural tour of New England.

The Oak View Mansion, located in Norwood, was built by Francis Olney Winslow. Construction began in 1868 and was completed in 1870. Oak View was the scene of almost constant socializing. Some of the most prominent figures hosted in Oak View were President and future Supreme Court Justice William Howard Taft and President Calvin Coolidge.

The town shares its name with a town in the borough of Croydon, South London, England. When Norwood separated from Dedham, they considered naming the new community Balch, after the Rev. Thomas Balch. [3]

Geography

Norwood is located at 42°11′9″N71°12′5″W / 42.18583°N 71.20139°W / 42.18583; -71.20139 (42.185974, -71.201661). [4]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 10.6 square miles (27.3 km2), of which 10.5 square mile (27.1 km2) is land and 0.1 square mile (0.2 km2) (0.66%) is water.

Demographics

Historical population
YearPop.±%
1880 2,845    
1890 3,733+31.2%
1900 5,480+46.8%
1910 8,014+46.2%
1920 12,627+57.6%
1930 15,049+19.2%
1940 15,383+2.2%
1950 16,636+8.1%
1960 24,898+49.7%
1970 30,815+23.8%
1980 29,711−3.6%
1990 28,700−3.4%
2000 28,587−0.4%
2010 28,602+0.1%
2020 31,611+10.5%
* = population estimate. Source: United States Census records and Population Estimates Program data. [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11]
Stained-glass window in Norwood Town Hall depicting town seal. Norwoodtownhallstainedglass.jpg
Stained-glass window in Norwood Town Hall depicting town seal.

As of the census [13] of 2010, there were 30,602 people. The racial makeup of the town was 80.92% White, 8.01% Black or African American, 0.09% Native American, 9.57% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.77% from other races, and 1.25% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.58% of the population. 27.3% were of Irish descent.

As of the census [13] of 2000, there were 28,587 people, 11,623 households, and 7,380 families residing in the town. The population density was 2,727.0 people per square mile (1,053.2/km2). There were 11,945 housing units at an average density of 1,139.5 per square mile (440.1/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 90.51% White, 2.31% Black or African American, 0.09% Native American, 5.06% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.77% from other races, and 1.25% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.65% of the population. 34.7% were of Irish, 14.8% Italian, 5.4% American and 5.0% English ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 11,623 households, out of which 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.9% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.5% were non-families. 29.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 3.05.

In the town, the population was spread out, with 20.8% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 33.2% from 25 to 44, 22.1% from 45 to 64, and 17.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.5 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $58,421, and the median income for a family was $70,164 (these figures had risen to $66,743 and $80,292 respectively as of a 2007 estimate [14] ). Males had a median income of $50,597 versus $34,312 for females. The per capita income for the town was $27,720. About 2.7% of families and 4.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.5% of those under age 18 and 3.9% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Norwood High School Norwood High School, Norwood MA.jpg
Norwood High School

The Norwood Public Schools operates seven schools, and an additional school institution, The Willett Early Childhood Center (serves preschool and kindergarten children). The public elementary schools located in Norwood include: Balch, Callahan, Cleveland, Oldham, and Prescott.

Norwood has one public middle school, the Dr. Philip O. Coakley Middle School (serving 6th through 8th graders) [15] (formerly Norwood Junior High South), where all five elementary schools combine. Norwood also has a public high school, Norwood High School (NHS), [16] (serves grades 9–12).

Built in 2005, Universal Technical Institute is the newest post-secondary education center in Norwood. It is an automotive technical school featuring the Mercedes Benz Elite MSAT and the Ford FACT specialized training programs. The campus is located at 1 Upland Road, less than a mile from the Boston Providence Pike.

The Fine Mortuary College in Norwood includes a one-room museum featuring antique embalming tables and centuries-old wooden coffins. [17]

Business

A large cluster of automobile dealerships on Route 1 is known as the Norwood "Automile". The concept of having competing dealerships join together to publicize the "Automile" as an automobile shopping center was largely the work of Ernie Boch, famous in the Boston area for his ads urging people to "Come on down!"

University Avenue in Norwood is the site of both semiconductor company Analog Devices Inc and medical software provider MEDITECH, Medical Information Technology, Inc., actually across the border in Westwood .

Architecture

Art

Norwood was the long-time home of photographer and publisher Fred Holland Day. As a photographer, Day at one point rivalled Alfred Stieglitz in influence. The publishing firm of Copeland and Day was the American publisher of Oscar Wilde's Salome with illustrations by Aubrey Beardsley. The Day House is now a museum and the headquarters of the Norwood Historical Society. F. Holland Day Historic House Museum located at 93 Day St.

Climate

Climate data for Norwood, Massachusetts (Norwood Memorial Airport), 1991−2020 normals, [lower-alpha 1] extremes 1895−present [lower-alpha 2]
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Average high °F (°C)39.5
(4.2)
42.3
(5.7)
48.9
(9.4)
61.2
(16.2)
71.3
(21.8)
80.4
(26.9)
85.7
(29.8)
84.3
(29.1)
76.8
(24.9)
65.7
(18.7)
54.6
(12.6)
44.3
(6.8)
62.9
(17.2)
Daily mean °F (°C)30.1
(−1.1)
32.0
(0.0)
39.2
(4.0)
50.1
(10.1)
59.6
(15.3)
68.8
(20.4)
74.3
(23.5)
72.4
(22.4)
64.5
(18.1)
53.4
(11.9)
44.1
(6.7)
35.3
(1.8)
52.0
(11.1)
Average low °F (°C)20.6
(−6.3)
21.6
(−5.8)
29.5
(−1.4)
39.0
(3.9)
47.9
(8.8)
57.3
(14.1)
62.8
(17.1)
60.6
(15.9)
52.1
(11.2)
41.2
(5.1)
33.6
(0.9)
26.3
(−3.2)
41.0
(5.0)
Average rainfall inches (mm)3.41
(87)
2.80
(71)
3.72
(94)
3.96
(101)
3.30
(84)
3.92
(100)
3.03
(77)
3.63
(92)
3.82
(97)
4.54
(115)
3.69
(94)
4.09
(104)
43.91
(1,115)
Average snowfall inches (cm)15.1
(38)
14.1
(36)
11.6
(29)
2.5
(6.4)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.3
(0.76)
1.7
(4.3)
10.8
(27)
56.1
(142)
Source: NOAA (snowfall data from WALPOLE 2) [22]

Transportation

Notable people

Notes

  1. Mean monthly maxima and minima (i.e. the highest and lowest temperature readings during an entire month or year) calculated based on data at said location from 1991 to 2020.
  2. Official records for Norwood were kept at the COOP from December 1900 to May 1911, the Weather Bureau Office from June 1911 to February 1937, at various locations in and around the city from March 1937 to July 1942, and at Norwood Memorial Airport since August 1942. For more information, see ThreadEx.

Related Research Articles

Beverly, Massachusetts City in Massachusetts, United States

Beverly is a city in Essex County, Massachusetts, and a suburb of Boston. The population was 42,670 at the time of the 2020 United States Census. A resort, residential, and manufacturing community on the Massachusetts North Shore, Beverly includes Ryal Side, Beverly Farms and Prides Crossing. Beverly is a rival of Marblehead for the title of being the birthplace of the U.S. Navy.

Billerica, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Billerica is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 40,243 according to the 2010 census. It takes its name from the town of Billericay in Essex, England.

Everett, Massachusetts City in Massachusetts, United States

Everett is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States, directly north of Boston, bordering the neighborhood of Charlestown. The population was 49,075 at the time of the 2020 United States Census.

Weston, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Weston is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, about 15 miles west of downtown Boston. At the time of the 2020 United States Census, the population of Weston was 11,851.

Canton, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Canton is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 21,561 at the 2010 census. Canton is part of Greater Boston, about 15 miles southwest of downtown Boston.

Quincy, Massachusetts City in Massachusetts, United States

Quincy is a U.S. city in Norfolk County, Massachusetts. It is the largest city in the county and a part of Metropolitan Boston as one of Boston's immediate southern suburbs. Its population in 2020 was 101,636, making it the seventh-largest city in the state. Known as the "City of Presidents", Quincy is the birthplace of two U.S. presidents—John Adams and his son John Quincy Adams—as well as John Hancock, a President of the Continental Congress and the first signer of the Declaration of Independence, as well as being the first and third Governor of Massachusetts.

Stoughton, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Stoughton is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 26,962 at the 2010 census. The town is located approximately 17 miles (27 km) from Boston, 25 miles (40 km) from Providence, and 35 miles (56 km) from Cape Cod.

Brockton, Massachusetts City in Massachusetts

Brockton is a city in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States; the population is 105,643 as of the 2020 United States Census. Along with Plymouth, it is one of the two county seats of Plymouth County. It is the seventh largest city in Massachusetts and is sometimes referred to as the "City of Champions", due to the success of native boxers Rocky Marciano and Marvin Hagler, as well as its successful Brockton High School sports programs. Two villages within it are Montello and Campello, both of which have MBTA Commuter Rail Stations and post offices. Campello is the smallest neighborhood, but also the most populous. Brockton hosts a baseball team, the Brockton Rox. It is the second-windiest city in the United States, with an average wind speed of 14.3 mph.

Lynnfield, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Lynnfield is a town in Essex County, Massachusetts, in the United States. At the 2010 census, the town population was 11,596.

Swampscott, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Swampscott is a town in Essex County, Massachusetts, United States, located 15 miles (24 km) up the coast from Boston in an area known as the North Shore. The population was 13,787 as of 2010. A former summer resort on Massachusetts Bay, Swampscott is today a fairly affluent residential community and includes the village of Beach Bluff, as well as part of the neighborhood of Clifton.

Burlington, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Burlington is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 26,377 at the 2020 census.

Reading, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Reading is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States, 16 miles (26 km) north of central Boston. The population was 24,747 at the 2010 census.

Stoneham, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Stoneham is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, nine miles (14.5 km) north of downtown Boston. Its population was 21,437 at the 2010 census. Its proximity to major highways and public transportation offer convenient access to Boston and the North Shore coastal region and beaches of Massachusetts. The town is the birthplace of the Olympic figure-skating medalist Nancy Kerrigan and is the location of the Stone Zoo.

Holbrook, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Holbrook is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. As of 2010, the town's population was 10,791.

Randolph, Massachusetts City in Massachusetts, United States

The town of Randolph is a suburban city in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. At the 2010 census, the city population was 32,158. Randolph adopted a new charter effective January 2010 providing for a council-manager form of government instead of the traditional town meeting. Randolph is one of thirteen Massachusetts municipalities that have applied for, and been granted, city forms of government but wish to retain "The town of" in their official names.

Wellesley, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Wellesley is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. Wellesley is part of Greater Boston. The population was 29,550 at the time of the 2020 census. Wellesley College, Babson College, and a campus of Massachusetts Bay Community College are located in Wellesley.

Winthrop, Massachusetts City in Massachusetts, United States

Winthrop is a city in Suffolk County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 19,316 at the 2020 census. Winthrop is an ocean-side suburban community in Greater Boston situated at the north entrance to Boston Harbor, close to Logan International Airport. It is located on a peninsula, 1.6 square miles (4.2 km2) in area, connected to Revere by a narrow isthmus and to East Boston by a bridge over the harbor inlet to the Belle Isle Marsh Reservation. Settled in 1630, Winthrop is one of the oldest communities in the United States. It is also one of the smallest and most densely populated municipalities in Massachusetts. It is one of the four cities that comprise Suffolk County. It is the southernmost part of the North Shore, with a 7-mile (11 km) shoreline that provides views of the Atlantic Ocean to the east and of the Boston skyline to the west.

Boxford, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Boxford is a town in Essex County, Massachusetts, United States. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the town's population in 2016 was 8,277.

Sharon, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Sharon is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 17,612 at the 2010 census. Sharon is part of Greater Boston, about 17 miles (27 km) southwest of downtown Boston, and is connected to both Boston and Providence by the Providence/Stoughton Line.

Marshfield, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Marshfield is a town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States, on Massachusetts's South Shore. The population was 25,132 at the 2010 census.

References

  1. "Census - Geographic Profile: Norwood town, Norfolk County, Massachusetts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 18, 2021.
  2. "Welcome to the Neponset River Watershed". Neponset.org. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  3. Cole, Brad (March 5, 2013). "Balch School to celebrate its centennial". Norwood Transcript. Retrieved July 11, 2019.
  4. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  5. "TOTAL POPULATION (P1), 2010 Census Summary File 1, All County Subdivisions within Massachusetts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 12, 2020. Retrieved September 13, 2011.
  6. "Massachusetts by Place and County Subdivision - GCT-T1. Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on November 3, 2011. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  7. "1990 Census of Population, General Population Characteristics: Massachusetts" (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1990. Table 76: General Characteristics of Persons, Households, and Families: 1990. 1990 CP-1-23. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 7, 2013. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  8. "1980 Census of the Population, Number of Inhabitants: Massachusetts" (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1981. Table 4. Populations of County Subdivisions: 1960 to 1980. PC80-1-A23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  9. "1950 Census of Population" (PDF). 1: Number of Inhabitants. Bureau of the Census. 1952. Section 6, Pages 21-10 and 21-11, Massachusetts Table 6. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1930 to 1950. Retrieved July 12, 2011.Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  10. "1920 Census of Population" (PDF). Bureau of the Census. Number of Inhabitants, by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions. Pages 21-5 through 21-7. Massachusetts Table 2. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1900, 1910, and 1920. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  11. "1890 Census of the Population" (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. Pages 179 through 182. Massachusetts Table 5. Population of States and Territories by Minor Civil Divisions: 1880 and 1890. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  12. It was suggested in 2006 that Guild's red coat must surely be historically inaccurate.Peter Schworm (2006-10-01). "He was a patriot, not a redcoat: Calls growing for new, accurate town seal". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 2006-10-06.: "Board chairman Jerry Kelleher said he, too, had noticed Guild's miscolored garment... He knew the red wasn't right." He said that "While the controversy has been 'mushrooming,' it's more a minor distraction than an embarrassing gaffe." Elisabeth McGregor , executive director of the Norwood Historical Society, said she found the flap "kind of comical", and noted the seal probably includes another mistake. 'It's April 19—would he really be plowing already?' she questioned. 'Seems pretty early.'"
  13. 1 2 "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  14. "American FactFinder". Factfinder.census.gov. Archived from the original on 2020-02-16. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  15. Archived March 2, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  16. Archived February 4, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  17. Brad Kelly (2006-01-20). "DYING TO VISIT? FUNERAL INDUSTRY FASCINATION GROWS: Mortuary school in Norwood opens museum to the public". Patriot Ledger. Retrieved 2006-07-06.[ permanent dead link ]; college website is http://www.fine-ne.com/
  18. Towerbells.org database: "Traditional carillon of 50 bells...Year of latest technical information source is 2015"
  19. World Carillon Federation, "Bells: 50"
  20. Norwood Library: Norwood Historical Records Archived 2015-11-24 at the Wayback Machine , "The building's 170-foot tower accommodates a 50 bell carillon"
  21. Boston Globe, South Regional edition 7/6/2013, Jean Lang: Norwood Town Hall gets a makeover: "Another concern is the carillon within the tower. There are 50 large bells that have been covered with blankets to protect them, but the blankets have to be taken on and off for the summer carillon concert series, which runs from July 1 to Aug. 19."
  22. "NowData - NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration . Retrieved 2021-05-15.
  23. Authority, Massachusetts Bay Transportation. "34E - Bus - MBTA". www.mbta.com. Retrieved 19 June 2018.
  24. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-10-18. Retrieved 2007-09-30.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  25. "The Automatic Life: Billionaire Ernie Boch Jr". Huffington Post. 2014-02-14.
  26. "Charlie Bowles Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  27. "Marty Callaghan Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  28. "Allen Doyle Official Profile". PGATOUR.com. 1948-07-26. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  29. Alfred Fincher (2012-01-01). "Alfred Fincher, LB at". Nfl.com. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  30. "Official Harry & the Potters site" . Retrieved 2013-04-13.
  31. "Ultimate Mets Database - Richie Hebner". Ultimatemets.com. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  32. Falla, Brian (2006), "Norwood's Natural", The Norwood Bulletin, October 5, 2006, p. 2. "Hebner's ties to Norwood remain a backbone of the story", a description of the making of a two-hour documentary on Hebner
  33. http://www.legendsofhockey.net:8080/LegendsOfHockey/jsp/SearchPlayer.jsp?player=10679
  34. Rhoda Leonard Obituary. AAGPBL official website. Retrieved on November 30, 2015.
  35. "Skip Lockwood Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  36. "Ray Martin Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  37. Baker, Billy (2007-06-24). "The Coolest Cruciverbalist". Boston Globe Magazine . Retrieved 2019-04-16.
  38. "Allen Ripley Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  39. GS Web Mistress (2012-07-27). "Home". Godsmack. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  40. "5 Things You Didn't Know About New 'Red Eye' Host Tom Shillue". 22 June 2015. Retrieved 19 June 2018.
  41. "Mike Smith Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  42. "Bill Travers Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  43. Sullivan, George (2020-02-18). "Honorable George SULLIVAN Jr". Legacy.com Obituaries. Archived from the original on 2020-02-18. Retrieved 2020-02-18.