Thompson, Connecticut

Last updated
Thompson, Connecticut
ThompsonCTseal.jpg
Seal
Windham County Connecticut incorporated and unincorporated areas Thompson highlighted.svg
Location in Windham County and the state of Connecticut.
Coordinates: 41°59′04″N71°52′40″W / 41.98444°N 71.87778°W / 41.98444; -71.87778 Coordinates: 41°59′04″N71°52′40″W / 41.98444°N 71.87778°W / 41.98444; -71.87778
CountryFlag of the United States.svg  United States
State Flag of Connecticut.svg  Connecticut
County Windham
NECTA Worcester, MA
Region Northeastern Connecticut
Incorporated1785
Government
  Type Selectman-town meeting
  First selectmanKenneth Beausoleil (D)
   State Senator Mae Flexer
(D-29th District)
   State Rep. Rick Hayes
(D-51st District)
Area
  Total48.7 sq mi (126.1 km2)
  Land46.9 sq mi (121.6 km2)
  Water1.7 sq mi (4.4 km2)
Elevation
469 ft (143 m)
Population
(2010)
  Total9,458
  Density190/sq mi (75/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (Eastern)
ZIP code
06255, 06262, 06277
Area code(s) 860
FIPS code 09-75870
GNIS feature ID0213516
Website http://www.thompsonct.org/

Thompson is a rural town in Windham County, Connecticut, United States. The town was named after Sir Robert Thompson, an English landholder. [1] The population was 9,458 at the 2010 census. [2] Thompson is located in the northeastern corner of the state and is bordered on the north by Webster, Massachusetts and Dudley, Massachusetts, on the east by Douglas, Massachusetts and Burrillville, Rhode Island, on the west by Woodstock, Connecticut, and on the south by Putnam, Connecticut.

New England town Basic unit of local government in each of the six New England federated states of the United States

The New England town, generally referred to simply as a town in New England, is the basic unit of local government and local division of state authority in each of the six New England states and without a direct counterpart in most other U.S. states. New England towns overlay the entire area of a state, similar to civil townships in other states where they exist, but they are fully functioning municipal corporations, possessing powers similar to cities in other states. New Jersey's system of equally powerful townships, boroughs, towns, and cities is the system which is most similar to that of New England. New England towns are often governed by a town meeting legislative body. The great majority of municipal corporations in New England are based on the town model; statutory forms based on the concept of a compact populated place are uncommon, though they are prevalent elsewhere in the U.S. County government in New England states is typically weak at best, and in some states nonexistent. Connecticut, for example, has no county governments, nor does Rhode Island. Both of those states retain counties only as geographic subdivisions with no governmental authority, while Massachusetts has abolished eight of fourteen county governments so far. With few exceptions, counties serve mostly as dividing lines for the states' judicial systems.

Windham County, Connecticut County in the United States

Windham County is a county located in the northeastern corner of the U.S. state of Connecticut. As of the 2010 census, the population was 118,428, making it the least populous county in Connecticut. It forms the core of the region known as the Quiet Corner.

Connecticut state of the United States of America

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the United States. As of the 2010 Census, it has the highest per-capita income, Human Development Index (0.962), and median household income in the United States. It is bordered by Rhode Island to the east, Massachusetts to the north, New York to the west, and Long Island Sound to the south. Its capital is Hartford and its most populous city is Bridgeport. It is part of New England, although portions of it are often grouped with New York and New Jersey as the Tri-state area. The state is named for the Connecticut River which approximately bisects the state. The word "Connecticut" is derived from various anglicized spellings of an Algonquian word for "long tidal river".

Contents

Thompson has the highest-banked race track (Thompson Speedway Motorsports Park, a 5/8 mile oval and a restored 1.7 mile road course) in New England. This speedway holds one of the biggest race programs in New England, The World Series of Auto Racing, where 16 divisions and about 400 cars show up each fall. Another claim to fame is that the Tri-State Marker is located just on the border of Thompson. The term "Swamp Yankee" is thought to have originated in Thompson during the American Revolution in 1776.

Thompson Speedway Motorsports Park

Thompson Speedway Motorsports Park (TSMP), formerly Thompson Speedway and Thompson International Speedway, is a motorsports park in Thompson, Connecticut, featuring a 58-mile (1.0 km) paved oval racetrack and a 1.7-mile (2.7 km) road racing course. Once known as the "Indianapolis of the East", it was the first asphalt-paved racing oval track in the United States and is now under the NASCAR Whelen All-American Series banner. Each year Thompson hosts one of the great fall variety events "The World Series of Auto Racing" highlighted by the International Supermodified Association and the NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour. This event frequently draws over 350 race cars in 16 separate divisions over three days.

"Swamp Yankee" is a colloquial pejorative for rural Yankees. The term "Yankee" connotes urbane industriousness, whereas the term "Swamp Yankee" suggests a more countrified, stubborn, independent, and less-refined subtype.

American Revolution Political upheaval, 1775–1783

The American Revolution was a colonial revolt that took place between 1765 and 1783. The American Patriots in the Thirteen Colonies won independence from Great Britain, becoming the United States of America. They defeated the British in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) in alliance with France and others.

Thompson was the site of the Great East Thompson Train Wreck in 1891, one of the worst train wrecks in American history and the only one to involve four trains.

The Great East Thompson Train Wreck was a large rail disaster which occurred in East Thompson, Connecticut, on December 4, 1891. It was one of the most extensive train wrecks in American history, and the only one to involve four trains. It happened on the New York and New England Railroad, which provided a shortcut from New York City to Boston by making a diagonal across Connecticut. The railroad is now abandoned, and most of its tracks removed.

Train wreck disaster involving one or more trains (for train colliding with a pedestrian, animal or other objects, see Q19403959)

A train wreck or train crash is a type of disaster involving one or more trains. Train wrecks often occur as a result of miscommunication, as when a moving train meets another train on the same track; or an accident, such as when a train wheel jumps off a track in a derailment; or when a boiler explosion occurs. Train wrecks have often been widely covered in popular media and in folklore.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 48.7 square miles (126 km2), of which 46.9 square miles (121 km2) is land and 1.7 square miles (4.4 km2), or 3.51%, is water. Thompson possesses many small ponds, such as Little Pond and Long Pond, as well as two principal lakes: West Thompson Lake and Quaddick Reservoir. Contained within its borders are several moderately sized rivers, including the French River and Five Mile River, both tributaries of the Quinebaug River, which also runs through Thompson. One of the highest points in Thompson and the surrounding villages is Fort Hill at 649 feet (198 m) above sea level. The city is located 64 miles southwest of Boston [3] and 110 miles northeast of Bridgeport. [4] It is on the 41st parallel north, putting it on the same latitude as Lake Ohrid in Albania.

United States Census Bureau bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

West Thompson Lake

West Thompson Lake is a 200-acre lake in Thompson, Windham County, Connecticut.

Quaddick Reservoir

Quaddick Reservoir is a man-made body of water in the town of Thompson, Connecticut. The reservoir has three sections: Lower, Middle, and Upper. It originated with the completion of a dam on the Five Mile River in 1865. Quaddick State Park sits on the eastern shore of the Middle Reservoir.


A minor point of geological interest is the Wilsonville Fault, created during the breakup of Pangaea nearly 200 million years ago. [5]

Pangaea Supercontinent from the late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic eras

Pangaea or Pangea was a supercontinent that existed during the late Paleozoic and early Mesozoic eras. It assembled from earlier continental units approximately 335 million years ago, and it began to break apart about 175 million years ago. In contrast to the present Earth and its distribution of continental mass, much of Pangaea was in the southern hemisphere and surrounded by a superocean, Panthalassa. Pangaea was the most recent supercontinent to have existed and the first to be reconstructed by geologists.

Adjacent towns

Burrillville, Rhode Island Burrillville in Rhode Island, United States

Burrillville is a town in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. The population was 15,955 at the 2010 census.

Douglas, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Douglas is a town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 8,471 at the 2010 census. It includes the sizable Douglas State Forest, managed by the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR).

Dudley, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Dudley is a town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 11,390 at the 2010 census.

Villages

Thompson is composed of ten villages:

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1820 2,928
1840 3,535
1850 4,63831.2%
1860 3,259−29.7%
1870 3,80416.7%
1880 5,05132.8%
1890 5,58010.5%
1900 6,44215.4%
1910 4,804−25.4%
1920 5,0555.2%
1930 4,999−1.1%
1940 5,57711.6%
1950 5,5850.1%
1960 6,21711.3%
1970 7,58021.9%
1980 8,1417.4%
1990 8,6686.5%
2000 8,8782.4%
2010 9,4586.5%
Est. 20149,308 [6] −1.6%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
The CT-RI-MA Tri-State marker located in Thompson CT-RI-MA Tripoint.JPG
The CT-RI-MA Tri-State marker located in Thompson

As of the census [8] of 2010, there were 9,458 people, 3,730 households, and 2,587 families residing in the town. The population density was 201.7 people per square mile (78.4/km²). There were 4,171 housing units at an average density of 88.9 per square mile (34.5/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 95.6% White, 0.6% African American, 0.4% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.6% from other races, and 1.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.8% of the population.

Of the 3,730 households: 28.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.7% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.6% were non-families. 24.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the town, the population was spread out with 21.8% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 24.5% from 25 to 44, 31.9% from 45 to 64, and 14.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.2 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $63,385, and the median income for a family was $75,652. Males had a median income of $52,716 versus $39,362 for females. The per capita income for the town was $29,044. About 5.1% of families and 7.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.7% of those under age 18 and 5.5% of those age 65 or over.

Schools

Thompson has a public school system in which the elementary, middle, and high school buildings are connected. The Mary R. Fisher Memorial Elementary School has students in pre-K through 4th grade, Thompson Middle School consists of grades 5-8, and Tourtellotte Memorial High School has students in grades 9-12. [9] Also in town are several private schools, the Catholic St Joseph's School, currently serving pre-K - grade 8, and Marianapolis Preparatory, a Marian high school located on historic Thompson Hill. [10] [11]

The original Tourtellotte Memorial High School building, which exists today as administrative offices for the school system, was built in the Greek Revival style. The cornerstone was laid in 1907 and the school opened in 1909. The school is named in memory of Dr. Jacob F. Tourtellotte. Tourtellotte was a ship's surgeon in the U.S. Navy during the Civil War. The school also houses a small museum, called the "Memorial Room" which contains portraits of Tourtellotte and his family, and some of their possessions. It is maintained by the local historical society, and is usually open to the public for tours one Sunday per month. [12]

Marianapolis Preparatory School was established in 1926, sponsored by the Congregation of Marians of the Immaculate Conception. [13] The school is located on the former Ream Estate, built by Norman Bruce Ream, a Director of The Pullman Company, U.S. Steel, and The National Biscuit Company, which is now known as Nabisco. The Estate, including the circa 1900 mansion "Carolyn Hall," named after Ream's wife, was sold to the Marians in 1931, but the Mansion burned down in 1964 and a new main school building was built in its place. [14]

Libraries

Public Library, circa 1908 Thompson, Connecticut Public Library 1908 postcard.jpg
Public Library, circa 1908

The Thompson Public Library [15] is located at 934 Riverside Drive, North Grosvenordale. It is combined with the town's Community Center, and contains 20,400 square feet (1,900 m2) holding 55,000 items, including books, magazines, CDs, DVDs, audio tapes, video tapes, and online resources.

The library was started in 1902 with 1,370 books in a small building on Thompson Hill, now known as the Ellen Larned Memorial Library. Two branches were created, the Quinebaug Branch, in operation from 1961 to 1994, and the Grosvenordale Branch, in operation from 1958 to 1966. Thompson was the first small town in Connecticut to have a bookmobile service, operating from 1966 to 1993. The current library in North Grosvenordale was finished in 1994.

Notable people

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References

  1. "Profile for Thompson, Connecticut". ePodunk . Retrieved 2010-05-11.
  2. "Race, Hispanic or Latino, Age, and Housing Occupancy: 2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File (QT-PL), Thompson town, Connecticut". U.S. Census Bureau, American FactFinder 2. Retrieved October 3, 2011.
  3. https://www.google.com/search?source=hp&ei=jmfCW9uBKM7TjgTw577oBA&q=distance+Thompson%2C+Connecticut+to+prague&btnK=Google+Search&oq=distance+Thompson%2C+Connecticut+to+prague&gs_l=psy-ab.3...922.5130..5462...1.0..0.125.2034.16j5......0....1j2..gws-wiz.......0j0i131j33i22i29i30j33i299j33i160.SYMd3RYyJ7g
  4. "USGS NE CT Survey" . Retrieved 2011-06-16.
  5. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Archived from the original on May 23, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  6. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  7. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  8. http://district.thompsonk12.org
  9. http://www.schoolofstjoseph.org
  10. http://www.marianapolis.org/About/About
  11. http://www.thompsonhistorical.org
  12. http://www.marianapolis.org/About/History
  13. Echoes of Old Thompson, Vol I