Chinese expedition to Tibet (1910)

Last updated
Chinese expedition to Tibet (1910)
Date1910
Location
Result Qing victory
Belligerents
Flag of the Qing Dynasty (1889-1912).svg  Qing Dynasty Tibet
Thirty-nine Hor tribes  [ zh ]
Kingdom of Powo
Commanders and leaders
Flag of the Qing Dynasty (1889-1912).svg Zhao Erfeng
Flag of the Qing Dynasty (1889-1912).svg Zhong Ying  [ zh ]
13th Dalai Lama
Kelsang Gyaltsen
Tsarong Dazang Dramdul

The 1910 Chinese expedition to Tibet or the Chinese invasion of Tibet in 1910 [1] was a military campaign of the Qing dynasty to establish direct rule in Tibet in early 1910. The expedition occupied Lhasa on February 12 and officially deposed the 13th Dalai Lama on the 25th. [2]

Contents

History

Qing rule of Tibet was established in the early 18th century after the 1720 Chinese expedition to Tibet.

After the British expedition to Tibet in 1904 and the Sino-British treaty in 1906, the Qing regime sent the 1910 expedition to Tibet to assert full control. As Professor Dawa Norbu stated, the British expedition and Treaty of Lhasa led to the Qing government to ensure that they held firm control over Tibet. Afterwards, the Dalai Lama then fled to India. [3]

After the outbreak of the Xinhai Revolution and the Xinhai Lhasa turmoil in 1911–1912, the Qing dynasty collapsed and was succeeded by the Republic of China (1912–1949).

See also

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Ganden Phodrang

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Tibet under Qing rule Tibetian rule from 1721 to 1912

Tibet under Qing rule refers to the Qing dynasty's rule over Tibet from 1720 to 1912. Tibet was under Khoshut Khanate rule from 1642 to 1717, with the Khoshuts conquered by Dzungar Khanate in 1717, and the Dzungars subsequently expelled by Qing in 1720. The Qing emperors appointed resident commissioners known as Ambans to Tibet, most of them are ethnic Manchus, who reported to the Lifan Yuan, a Qing government body that oversaw the empire's frontier. Tibet under Qing rule retained a degree of political autonomy under the Dalai Lamas nonetheless.

The 1720 Chinese expedition to Tibet or the Chinese conquest of Tibet in 1720 was a military expedition sent by the Qing empire to expel the invading forces of the Dzungar Khanate from Tibet and establish a Chinese protectorate over the country. The expedition occupied Lhasa and some claim it marked the beginning of Qing rule in Tibet, which lasted until the empire's fall in 1912.

References

  1. Sky Train: Tibetan Women on the Edge of History, by Canyon Sam, p258
  2. Melvyn C. Goldstein. A History of Modern Tibet, 1913-1951: The Demise of the Lamaist State .
  3. Norbu, Dawa (2011), Tibet: The Road Ahead, Ebury Publishing, ISBN   978-1-4464-5968-3