City of Orange (New South Wales)

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City of Orange
New South Wales
Orange LGA NSW.png
Location in New South Wales
Coordinates 33°17′S149°06′E / 33.283°S 149.100°E / -33.283; 149.100 Coordinates: 33°17′S149°06′E / 33.283°S 149.100°E / -33.283; 149.100
Population
 • Density141.56/km2 (366.6/sq mi)
Established9 January 1860
Area285 km2 (110.0 sq mi)
MayorReg Kidd (Independent)
Council seat Orange [3]
Region Central West
State electorate(s) Orange
Federal Division(s) Calare
Orange City Council.jpg
Website City of Orange
LGAs around City of Orange:
Cabonne Dubbo Regional Mid-Western
Cabonne City of Orange Bathurst
Cowra Blayney

The City of Orange is a local government area in the central west region of New South Wales, Australia. Based in Orange, the area is located adjacent to the Mitchell Highway and the Main Western railway line.

Contents

Suburbs and localities

Suburbs of Orange:

Other localities:

Heritage listings

The City of Orange has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

Council history

Situated on Blackman's Swamp Creek, Orange was proclaimed a village in 1846 and the local parish was named by the Surveyor General, Major Sir Thomas Mitchell, in honour of Prince William of Orange, whom had been an associate of in the Peninsular War, when both were aides-de-camp to the Duke of Wellington, whose title was bestowed on the valley to the west by John Oxley. [14] Much of the town's subsequent growth and development in the early years was due to the discovery of gold in 1851 at Ophir and Lucknow. The resulting gold rush attracted a wide range of people and business to the district, many of whom settled in the region and developed a strong agricultural industry, particularly in the growing of wheat and barley.

Orange was first incorporated on 9 January 1860 when the Municipality of Orange was proclaimed. [15] The first election for a six-member council was held on 9 February 1860, with John Peisley elected as the first Chairman. The first meeting of the Council was held at the Court House on 18 February 1860, with George Dolquhorn appointed as the first Town Clerk. [16]

This new council fell into controversy within a few years however, with the legality of the council constitution questioned in 1866 and the council suspended by order of the Supreme Court of New South Wales. With the Municipalities Act 1867, the Council was reconstituted and a new council was elected on 14 February 1868. In 1888, the Municipality of East Orange was proclaimed and merged with the Orange Municipality on 24 December 1912. [16] [17] [18]

Orange was proclaimed a City on 19 July 1946 when its population was over 15,000. [19] On 1 October 1977, the City of Orange was extended in area to 298 km2 when parts of the surrounding shires of Cabonne, Blayney, and Lyndhurst were transferred to the City of Orange. [16]

2016–17 amalgamation proposal

A 2015 review of local government boundaries recommended that the City of Orange merge with the Cabonne Shire and Blayney Shire Councils to form a new council with an area of 7,833 square kilometres (3,024 sq mi) and support a population of approximately 63,000. [20] Despite originally planning for the amalgamation to go ahead, the merger scheduled for May 2016 was delayed due to legal action, and in February 2017 the NSW Government decided not to proceed with the amalgamation. [21] [22] [23]

Council

Current composition and election method

Orange City Council is composed of eleven Councillors elected proportionally as a single ward. All Councillors are elected for a fixed four-year term of office. The Mayor is elected directly by a popular vote. A referendum was held on 8 September 2012 and an absolute majority of voters resolved in favour to directly-elect the Mayor, which took effect from the 2017 election. [24] The most recent election was held on 9 September 2017, but due to delays caused by council amalgamations the current term will last only three years to 2020. The makeup of the Council is as follows: [25] [26]

PartyCouncillors
  Independents and Unaligned9
  Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party 2
  Greens New South Wales 1
Total12

The current Council, elected in 2017, in order of election, is: [25] [26]

MayorPartyNotes
 Reg Kidd Independent Mayor, 2008–2009
CouncillorPartyNotes
 Sam Romano Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Deputy Mayor Sept 2018-
 Kevin DuffyIndependent
 Joanne McRaeIndependentDeputy Mayor, 2017–2018 [27]
 Jason HamlingIndependentDeputy Mayor, 2016–2017 [28]
 Tony MiletoIndependent
  Russell Turner UnalignedState MP for Orange, 1996–2011
 Stephen Nugent Greens
 Scott MunroIndependent
 Mario PreviteraShooters, Fishers and Farmers
 Jeff WhittonUnaligned
 Glenn TaylorUnaligned

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References

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  2. "3218.0 – Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2017-18". Australian Bureau of Statistics. 27 March 2019. Retrieved 27 March 2019. Estimated resident population (ERP) at 30 June 2018.
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  4. "Wentworth and Reform Gold Mines". New South Wales State Heritage Register . Office of Environment and Heritage. H02004. Retrieved 18 February 2020.
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  11. "Berrilea". New South Wales State Heritage Register . Office of Environment and Heritage. H00361. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
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  13. "Duntryleague with Lodge, Park, Gates, Stables". New South Wales State Heritage Register . Office of Environment and Heritage. H00318. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
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  18. "PROCLAMATION". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (183). New South Wales, Australia. 24 December 1912. p. 7513. Retrieved 20 May 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  19. "LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919.—PROCLAMATION". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (78). New South Wales, Australia. 19 July 1946. p. 1598. Retrieved 20 May 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  20. "Merger proposal: Blayney Shire Council, Cabonne Shire, Orange City Council" (PDF). Government of New South Wales. January 2016. p. 7. Retrieved 4 March 2016.
  21. Davies, Anne; McKenny, Leesha; Neil, Dave (18 December 2015). "BREAKING NEWSOrange City Council to merge with Blayney and Cabonne". Central Western Daily. Retrieved 20 May 2018.
  22. "Orange City Council misses first round of council mergers" (Media Release). Orange City Council. 13 May 2016. Retrieved 20 May 2018.
  23. Nicholls, Sean; Visentin, Lisa (13 February 2017). "Orange-Cabonne-Blayney merger officially scrapped by premier". Central Western Daily. Retrieved 20 May 2018.
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  25. 1 2 "Orange City Council: Mayoral contest". Local Government Elections 2017. New South Wales Electoral Commission. 9 September 2017. Retrieved 20 May 2018.
  26. 1 2 "Orange City Council: Councillor contest". Local Government Elections 2017. New South Wales Electoral Commission. 9 September 2017. Retrieved 20 May 2018.
  27. "OUR SAY: Well-wishes for deputy mayor Jo McRae a welcome change". Central Western Daily. 27 September 2017. Retrieved 20 May 2018.
  28. Rurenga, Declan (7 September 2016). "John Davis re-elcted as mayor of Orange City Council; Cr Jason Hamling elected as deputy mayor". Central Western Daily. Retrieved 20 May 2018.