Biological hazard

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The biohazard symbol Biohazard symbol (black and yellow).png
The biohazard symbol

A biological hazard, or biohazard, is a biological substance that poses a threat to the health of living organisms, primarily humans. This could include a sample of a microorganism, virus or toxin that can adversely affect human health. A biohazard could also be a substance harmful to other animals. [upper-alpha 1]

Contents

The term and its associated symbol are generally used as a warning, so that those potentially exposed to the substances will know to take precautions. The biohazard symbol was developed in 1966 by Charles Baldwin, an environmental-health engineer working for the Dow Chemical Company on the containment products. [1]

It is used in the labeling of biological materials that carry a significant health risk, including viral samples and used hypodermic needles.

In Unicode, the biohazard symbol is U+2623 ().

Classification

Bio hazardous agents are classified for transportation by UN number: [2]

Levels of biohazard

Immediate disposal of used needles into a sharps container is standard procedure. Sharps Container.jpg
Immediate disposal of used needles into a sharps container is standard procedure.
NHS medics practice using protective equipment used when treating Ebola patients Army trainers teach NHS medics how to put on Ebola safety suits (15650293350).jpg
NHS medics practice using protective equipment used when treating Ebola patients

The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) categorizes various diseases in levels of biohazard, Level 1 being minimum risk and Level 4 being extreme risk. Laboratories and other facilities are categorized as BSL (Biosafety Level) 1–4 or as P1 through P4 for short (Pathogen or Protection Level).

Symbol

Biological hazard
In  Unicode U+2623BIOHAZARD SIGN (HTML ☣)
Related
See alsoU+2622 RADIOACTIVE SIGN

The biohazard symbol was developed by the Dow Chemical Company in 1966 for their containment products. [1] According to Charles Baldwin, [1] an environmental-health engineer who contributed to its development: "We wanted something that was memorable but meaningless, so we could educate people as to what it means." In an article he wrote for Science in 1967, [4] the symbol was presented as the new standard for all biological hazards ("biohazards"). The article explained that over 40 symbols were drawn up by Dow artists, and all of the symbols investigated had to meet a number of criteria:

  1. Striking in form in order to draw immediate attention;
  2. Unique and unambiguous, in order not to be confused with symbols used for other purposes;
  3. Quickly recognizable and easily recalled;
  4. Symmetric, in order to appear identical from all angles of approach;
  5. Acceptable to groups of varying ethnic backgrounds.

The chosen symbol scored the best on nationwide testing for memorability. [5]

Biohazard Symbol Specification.png

The design was first specified in 39 FR 23680 but was dropped in the succeeding amendment. However, various US states adopted the specification for their state code. [6]

See also

Related Research Articles

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A biological agent is a bacterium, virus, protozoan, parasite, or fungus that can be used purposefully as a weapon in bioterrorism or biological warfare (BW). In addition to these living or replicating pathogens, toxins and biotoxins are also included among the bio-agents. More than 1,200 different kinds of potentially weaponizable bio-agents have been described and studied to date.

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References

  1. See Classification, "Category A, UN 2900"
  1. 1 2 3 "Biohazard Symbol History". Archived from the original on February 13, 2012.
  2. "USDA Policies and Procedures on Biohazardous Waste Decontamination, Management, and Quality Controls at Laboratories and Technical Facilities". USDA. Archived from the original on March 5, 2017. Retrieved December 17, 2016.
  3. Tigabu, Bersabeh; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E. Lucile; Tower, Nichole; Saeed, Mohammad; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W.; Noah, James W. (1 April 2014). "A BSL-4 High-Throughput Screen Identifies Sulfonamide Inhibitors of Nipah Virus". Assay and Drug Development Technologies. 12 (3): 155–161. doi:10.1089/adt.2013.567. PMC   3994909 .
  4. http://www.iconglobe.net/blog/2011/01/07/biohazard-symbol-history/%5B%5D
  5. Baldwin, C. L.; Runkle, R. S. (13 October 1967). "Biohazards Symbol: Development of a Biological Hazards Warning Signal". Science. 158 (3798): 264–265. Bibcode:1967Sci...158..264B. doi:10.1126/science.158.3798.264. PMID   6053882.
  6. WAC 296-800-11045 Archived February 10, 2012, at the Wayback Machine , see PDF for a high resolution graphic

Bibliography