List of Olympic Games scandals and controversies

Last updated

The Olympic Games is a major international multi-sport event. During its history, both the Summer and Winter Games were a subject of many scandals, controversies, and illegal drug uses.

Contents

Some states have boycotted the Games on various occasions, often as a sign of protest against the International Olympic Committee, often having racial discrimination or contemporary politics of other participants. After both World Wars, the losing countries were not invited. Other controversies include doping programs, decisions by referees and even gestures made by athletes.

Summer Olympics

1908 Summer Olympics – London, England, United Kingdom

1912 Summer Olympics – Stockholm, Sweden

1916 Summer Olympics (not held due to World War I)

1920 Summer Olympics – Antwerp, Belgium

1924 Summer Olympics – Paris, France

1932 Summer Olympics – Los Angeles, California, United States

1936 Summer Olympics – Berlin, Germany

Adolf Hitler arriving at the opening ceremony of the controversial 1936 Berlin Games Bundesarchiv Bild 146-1976-033-17, Berlin, Olympische Spiele.jpg
Adolf Hitler arriving at the opening ceremony of the controversial 1936 Berlin Games
Jesse Owens on the podium after winning the long jump at the 1936 Summer Olympics Bundesarchiv Bild 183-G00630, Sommerolympiade, Siegerehrung Weitsprung.jpg
Jesse Owens on the podium after winning the long jump at the 1936 Summer Olympics

1940 and 1944 Summer Olympics (not held due to World War II)

1948 Summer Olympics – London, England, United Kingdom

1956 Summer Olympics – Melbourne, Australia and Stockholm, Sweden

1964 Summer Olympics – Tokyo, Japan

1968 Summer Olympics – Mexico City, Mexico

1972 Summer Olympics – Munich, West Germany

1976 Summer Olympics – Montreal, Canada

Countries boycotting the 1976 (yellow), 1980 (blue) and 1984 (red) Summer Olympics Olympic boycotts from 1976 - 1984.png
Countries boycotting the 1976 (yellow), 1980 (blue) and 1984 (red) Summer Olympics

1980 Summer Olympics – Moscow, Soviet Union

1984 Summer Olympics – Los Angeles, California, United States

1988 Summer Olympics – Seoul, Republic of Korea

1992 Summer Olympics – Barcelona, Spain

1996 Summer Olympics – Atlanta, USA

2000 Summer Olympics – Sydney, Australia

2004 Summer Olympics – Athens, Greece

2008 Summer Olympics – Beijing, China

2012 Summer Olympics – London, England, United Kingdom

2016 Summer Olympics – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

2020 Summer Olympics – Tokyo, Japan

Winter Olympics

1928 Winter Olympics – St Moritz, Switzerland

1968 Winter Olympics – Grenoble, France

1972 Winter Olympics – Sapporo, Japan

1976 Winter Olympics – Innsbruck, Austria

1980 Winter Olympics – Lake Placid, New York, United States

1994 Winter Olympics – Lillehammer, Norway

1998 Winter Olympics – Nagano, Japan

2002 Winter Olympics – Salt Lake City, Utah, United States

2006 Winter Olympics – Turin, Italy

2010 Winter Olympics – Vancouver, Canada

2014 Winter Olympics – Sochi, Russia

2018 Winter Olympics – PyeongChang, Republic of Korea

2022 Winter Olympics – Beijing, China

See also

Related Research Articles

Olympic Games Major international sport event

The modern Olympic Games or Olympics are leading international sporting events featuring summer and winter sports competitions in which thousands of athletes from around the world participate in a variety of competitions. The Olympic Games are considered the world's foremost sports competition with more than 200 nations participating. The Olympic Games are normally held every four years, alternating between the Summer and Winter Olympics every two years in the four-year period.

Summer Olympic Games International multi-sport event

The Summer Olympic Games also known as the Games of the Olympiad, are a major international multi-sport event normally held once every four years. The Games were first held in 1896 in Athens, Greece, and were most recently held in 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) organises the Games and oversees the host city's preparations. In each Olympic event, gold medals are awarded for first place, silver medals are awarded for second place, and bronze medals are awarded for third place; this tradition began in 1904. The Winter Olympic Games were created out of the success of the Summer Olympics.

Winter Olympic Games Major international sporting event

The Winter Olympic Games is a major international multi-sport event held once every four years for sports practiced on snow and ice. The first Winter Olympic Games, the 1924 Winter Olympics, were held in Chamonix, France. The modern Olympic Games were inspired by the ancient Olympic Games, which were held in Olympia, Greece, from the 8th century BC to the 4th century AD. Baron Pierre de Coubertin founded the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in 1894, leading to the first modern Summer Olympic Games in Athens, Greece in 1896. The IOC is the governing body of the Olympic Movement, with the Olympic Charter defining its structure and authority.

1976 Summer Olympics Games of the XXI Olympiad, held in Montreal in 1976

The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad and commonly known as Montréal 1976, were an international multi-sport event held from July 17 to August 1, 1976 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Montreal was awarded the rights to the 1976 Games at the 69th IOC Session in Amsterdam on May 12, 1970. Montreal is the second French speaking city to host the Summer Olympics after Paris, over the bids of Moscow and Los Angeles. It was the first and, so far, only Summer Olympic Games to be held in Canada. Toronto hosted the 1976 Summer Paralympics the same year as the Montreal Olympics, which still remains the only Summer Paralympics to be held in Canada. Calgary and Vancouver later hosted the Winter Olympic Games in 1988 and 2010, respectively.

1980 Summer Olympics Games of the XXII Olympiad, held in Moscow in 1980

The 1980 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXII Olympiad and commonly known as Moscow 1980, were an international multi-sport event held from 19 July to 3 August 1980 in Moscow, Soviet Union, in present-day Russia. The Games were the first to be staged in Eastern Europe, and remain the only Summer Olympics held there, as well as the first Olympic Games and only Summer Olympics to be held in a Slavic language-speaking country. They were also the only Summer Olympic Games to be held in a communist country until 2008 Summer Olympics held in China. These were the final Olympic Games under the IOC Presidency of Michael Morris, 3rd Baron Killanin.

Soviet Union at the Olympics Sporting event delegation

The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) first participated at the Olympic Games in 1952, and competed at the Summer and Winter Games on 18 occasions subsequently. At six of its nine appearances at the Summer sports, the Soviet team ranked top place in the total number of gold medals won, it was second place by this count on the other three, which became the biggest contender to United States domination in Summer Games. Similarly, the team was ranked first in the gold medal count seven times and second twice in nine appearances at the Winter Olympic Games. Soviet Union's success might be attributed to a heavy state's investment in sports to fulfill its political agenda on an international stage.

1980 Summer Olympics boycott International protest against the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan

The 1980 Summer Olympics boycott was one part of a number of actions initiated by the United States to protest against the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. The Soviet Union, which hosted the 1980 Summer Olympics, and its allies would later boycott the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles.

United States at the Olympics Sporting event delegation

The United States of America (USA) has sent athletes to every celebration of the modern Olympic Games with the exception of the 1980 Summer Olympics, during which it led a boycott to protest the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. The United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee (USOPC) is the National Olympic Committee for the United States.

United States at the Summer Olympics Sporting event delegation

The United States of America has sent athletes to every celebration of the modern Summer Olympic Games with the exception of the 1980 Summer Olympics, during which it led a boycott. The United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee (USOPC) is the National Olympic Committee for the United States.

Russia at the Olympics Sporting event delegation

Russia, also known as the Russian Federation, has competed at the modern Olympic Games on many occasions, but as different nations in its history. As the Russian Empire, the nation first competed at the 1900 Games, and returned again in 1908 and 1912. After the Russian revolution in 1917, and the subsequent establishment of the Soviet Union in 1922, it would be thirty years until Russian athletes once again competed at the Olympics, as the Soviet Union at the 1952 Summer Olympics. After the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, Russia competed as part of the Unified Team in 1992, and finally returned once again as Russia at the 1994 Winter Olympics.

This article is about the history of competitors at the Olympic Games using banned athletic performance-enhancing drugs.

Athletics at the 2008 Summer Olympics were held during the last ten days of the games, from August 15 to August 24, 2008, at the Beijing National Stadium. The Olympic sport of athletics is split into four distinct sets of events: track and field events, road running events, and racewalking events.

Russia at the 2008 Summer Olympics Sporting event delegation

The Russian Federation competed at the 2008 Summer Olympics, held in Beijing, China, represented by the Russian Olympic Committee. Russia competed in all sports except baseball, football, field hockey, softball and taekwondo.

2008 Summer Olympics medal table

The 2008 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, were a summer multi-sport event held in Beijing, the capital of the People's Republic of China, from 8 to 24 August 2008. Approximately 10,942 athletes from 204 National Olympic Committees (NOCs) participated in 302 events in 28 sports.

Athletics at the 2012 Summer Olympics

The athletics competitions at the 2012 Olympic Games in London were held during the last 10 days of the Games, on 3–12 August. Track and field events took place at the Olympic Stadium in east London. The road events, however, started and finished on The Mall in central London.

Russia at the 2014 Winter Olympics Sporting event delegation

Russia competed at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, from 7 to 23 February 2014 as the host nation. As host, Russia participated in all 15 sports, with a team consisting of 232 athletes. It is Russia's largest Winter Olympics team to date.

2012 Summer Olympics medal table

The 2012 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXX Olympiad, were a summer multi-sport event held in London, the capital of the United Kingdom, from 27 July to 12 August. A total of 10,768 athletes from 204 nations participated in 302 events in 26 sports across 39 different disciplines.

Independent Olympians at the Olympic Games Sporting event delegation

Athletes have competed as Independent Olympians at the Olympic Games for various reasons, including political transition, international sanctions, suspensions of National Olympic Committees, and compassion. Independent athletes have come from the Republic of Macedonia, East Timor, South Sudan and Curaçao following geopolitical changes in the years before the Olympics, from the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia as a result of international sanctions, from India and Kuwait due to the suspensions of their National Olympic Committees, and Russia for mass violations of anti-doping rules.

Olympic Athletes from Russia at the 2018 Winter Olympics Sporting event delegation

Olympic Athlete from Russia (OAR) is the International Olympic Committee's (IOC) designation of select Russian athletes permitted to participate in the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. The designation was instigated following the suspension of the Russian Olympic Committee after the Russian doping scandal. This was the second time that Russian athletes had participated under the neutral Olympic flag, the first being in the Unified Team of 1992.

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