List of important publications in philosophy

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This is a list of important publications in philosophy, organized by field. The publications on this list are regarded as important because they have served or are serving as one or more of the following roles:

Contents

Historical philosophical texts

European and Islamic philosophy

Ancient philosophy

Medieval philosophy

Early modern philosophy

Title page of Advancement of Learning by Francis Bacon Advancement of learning.jpg
Title page of Advancement of Learning by Francis Bacon

Nineteenth-century philosophy

Asian philosophy

Indian philosophy

Chinese philosophy

Zhou Dynasty
Warring States
Song Dynasty

Japanese philosophy

Pre-Meiji Buddhism
Early modern

Contemporary philosophical texts

Phenomenology and existentialism

Hermeneutics and deconstruction

Structuralism and post-structuralism

Critical theory and Marxism

Epistemology

Metaphysics

Philosophy of mind

Philosophy of religion

Philosophy of science

Philosophy of biology

Philosophy of chemistry

  • Eric Scerri and Lee C. McIntyre, "The Case for the Philosophy of Chemistry", 1997
  • Davis Baird, Eric Scerri, and Lee C. McIntyre (eds.), Philosophy of Chemistry: Synthesis of a New Discipline, 2006

Philosophy of physics

Philosophy of psychology

Aesthetics

Ethics and value theory

Ethics

Meta-ethics

  • P. F. Strawson, "Freedom and Resentment", 1962
  • John McDowell, "Virtue and Reason", 1972
  • John McDowell, "Non-Cognitivism and Rule-Following", 1981
  • Jürgen Habermas, Justification and Application: Remarks on Discourse Ethics, 1993

Bioethics

Identity

Social philosophy

Philosophy of economics

Philosophy of education

Philosophy of history

Philosophy of law

Political philosophy

Logic, language, and mathematics

Logic and philosophy of logic

Philosophy of language

Philosophy of mathematics

Chinese and Japanese thought

See also

Notes

  1. Palmer, John (2 August 2016). "Parmenides (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)". Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Stanford University. Retrieved 2018-12-06.
  2. Brickhouse, Thomas; Smith, Nicholas. "Plato (427–347 B.C.E.)". Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. ISSN   2161-0002 . Retrieved 2018-12-06.
  3. Hermeticism has philosophical as well as a religious and esoteric aspect.
  4. The Ordinatio, is taken to be Scotus' premier work.
  5. 'New Confucianism is perhaps the most influential form of Confucian philosophy in the twentieth century: The following essay, published on New Year’s Day 1958, is often referred to as the "New Confucian Manifesto" (even though that particular phrase never occurs in it).' "Eirik Harris' translation of "Manifesto on Behalf of Chinese Culture," by Mou Zongsan et al". hackettpublishing.com. Retrieved 2019-12-26.

Further reading

Related Research Articles

Epistemology Branch of philosophy concerned with the nature and scope of knowledge

Epistemology is the branch of philosophy concerned with knowledge. Epistemologists study the nature of knowledge, epistemic justification, the rationality of belief, and various related issues. Epistemology is considered one of the four main branches of philosophy, along with ethics, logic, and metaphysics.

Metaphysics Branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of reality

Metaphysics is the branch of philosophy that examines the fundamental nature of reality, including the relationship between mind and matter, between substance and attribute, and between potentiality and actuality. The word "metaphysics" comes from two Greek words that, together, literally mean "after or behind or among [the study of] the natural". It has been suggested that the term might have been coined by a first century AD editor who assembled various small selections of Aristotle’s works into the treatise we now know by the name Metaphysics.

Problem of universals Philosophical question of whether properties exist, and if so, what they are

The problem of universals is an ancient question from metaphysics which has inspired a range of philosophical topics and disputes. Should the properties an object has in common with other objects, such as colour and shape, be considered to exist beyond those objects? And if a property exists separately from objects, what is the nature of that existence?

Reason Capacity for consciously making sense of things

Reason is the capacity of consciously making sense of things, applying logic, and adapting or justifying practices, institutions, and beliefs based on new or existing information. It is closely associated with such characteristically human activities as philosophy, science, language, mathematics, and art, and is normally considered to be a distinguishing ability possessed by humans. Reason is sometimes referred to as rationality.

In philosophy, rationalism is the epistemological view that "regards reason as the chief source and test of knowledge" or "any view appealing to reason as a source of knowledge or justification". More formally, rationalism is defined as a methodology or a theory "in which the criterion of the truth is not sensory but intellectual and deductive".

Teleology Philosophical study of nature by attempting to describe things in terms of their apparent purpose, directive principle, or goal

Teleology or finality is a reason or explanation for something as a function of its end, purpose, or goal. A purpose that is imposed by a human use, such as that of a fork, is called extrinsic.

Analytic philosophy Style of philosophy

Analytic philosophy is a branch or tradition of philosophy using analysis which is popular in the Western World and Anglosphere, beginning around the turn of the 20th century in the contemporary era and continues today. In the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Scandinavia, the majority of university philosophy departments today identify themselves as "analytic" departments.

<i>How to Read a Book</i> book

How to Read a Book is a 1940 book by the philosopher Mortimer J. Adler. He co-authored a heavily revised edition in 1972 with the editor Charles Van Doren, which gives guidelines for critically reading good and great books of any tradition. The 1972 revision, in addition to the first edition, treats genres, inspectional and syntopical reading.

John McDowell South African philosopher and academic

John Henry McDowell is a South African philosopher, formerly a fellow of University College, Oxford and now University Professor at the University of Pittsburgh. Although he has written extensively on metaphysics, epistemology, ancient philosophy, and meta-ethics, McDowell's most influential work has been in the philosophy of mind and philosophy of language. McDowell was one of three recipients of the 2010 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation's Distinguished Achievement Award, and is a Fellow of both the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the British Academy.

Pluralism is a term used in philosophy, meaning "doctrine of multiplicity", often used in opposition to monism and dualism. The term has different meanings in metaphysics, ontology, epistemology and logic.

Aristotelianism Tradition in philosophy

Aristotelianism is a tradition of philosophy that takes its defining inspiration from the work of Aristotle. This school of thought, in the modern sense of philosophy, covers existence, ethics, mind and related subjects. In Aristotle's time, philosophy included natural philosophy, which preceded the advent of modern science during the Scientific Revolution. The works of Aristotle were initially defended by the members of the Peripatetic school and later on by the Neoplatonists, who produced many commentaries on Aristotle's writings. In the Islamic Golden Age, Avicenna and Averroes translated the works of Aristotle into Arabic and under them, along with philosophers such as Al-Kindi and Al-Farabi, Aristotelianism became a major part of early Islamic philosophy.

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to philosophy:

Metaphysical naturalism is a philosophical worldview which holds that there is nothing but natural elements, principles, and relations of the kind studied by the natural sciences. Methodological naturalism is a philosophical basis for science, for which metaphysical naturalism provides only one possible ontological foundation. Broadly, the corresponding theological perspective is religious naturalism or spiritual naturalism. More specifically, metaphysical naturalism rejects the supernatural concepts and explanations that are part of many religions.

Julia Elizabeth Annas is a British philosopher who has taught in the United States for the last quarter-century. She is Regents Professor of Philosophy at the University of Arizona.

The International Library of Psychology, Philosophy and Scientific Method was an influential series of monographs published from 1922 to 1965 under the general editorship of Charles Kay Ogden by Kegan Paul Trench & Trubner in London. This series published some of the landmark works on psychology and philosophy, particularly the thought of the Vienna Circle in English. It published some of the major psychologists and philosophers of the time, such as Alfred Adler, C. D. Broad, Rudolf Carnap, F. M. Cornford, Edmund Husserl, Carl Jung, Kurt Koffka, Ernst Kretschmer, Bronisław Malinowski, Karl Mannheim, George Edward Moore, Jean Nicod, Jean Piaget, Frank P. Ramsey, Otto Rank, W. H. R. Rivers, Louis Leon Thurstone, Jakob von Uexküll, Hans Vaihinger, Edvard Westermarck, William Morton Wheeler, Ludwig Wittgenstein, J. N. Findlay and others. Most of the 204 volumes in the series have been reprinted, some in revised editions.

Romanian philosophy is a name covering either a) the philosophy done in Romania or by Romanians, or b) an ethnic philosophy, which expresses at a high level the fundamental features of the Romanian spirituality, or which elevates to a philosophical level the Weltanschauung of the Romanian people, as deposited in language and folklore, traditions, architecture and other linguistic and cultural artifacts.

Philosophy Study of the truths and principles of being, knowledge, or conduct

Philosophy is the study of general and fundamental questions about existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language. Such questions are often posed as problems to be studied or resolved. The term was probably coined by Pythagoras. Philosophical methods include questioning, critical discussion, rational argument, and systematic presentation.

Western philosophy Philosophy of the Western world

Western philosophy refers to the philosophical thought and work of the Western world. Historically, the term refers to the philosophical thinking of Western culture, beginning with Greek philosophy of the pre-Socratics such as Thales and Pythagoras, and eventually covering a large area of the globe. The word philosophy itself originated from the Ancient Greek philosophía (φιλοσοφία), literally, "the love of wisdom".

The KK thesis or KK principle is a principle of epistemic logic which states that "If you know that P is the case then you know that you know that P is the case." This means that one cannot know that P if he does not know whether his knowledge of P is correct. Its application in science can be expressed in the way that it must not only justify its knowledge claims but it must also justify its method of justifying.

This is a list of philosophical literature articles.