Amdo Tibetan

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Amdolese
ཨ་མདོ་སྐད་, A-mdo skad
Native to China
Region Qinghai, Gansu, Tibet Autonomous Region, Sichuan, Amdo
Native speakers
1.8 million (2005) [1]
Tibetan alphabet
Language codes
ISO 639-3 adx
Glottolog amdo1237 [2]
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The Amdo Tibetan (Tibetan : ཨ་མདོ་སྐད་, Wylie : A-mdo skad, Lhasa dialect : [ámtokɛ́ʔ] ; also called Am kä) is the Tibetic language spoken by the majority of Amdowa, mainly in Qinghai and some parts of Sichuan (Ngawa Tibetan and Qiang Autonomous Prefecture) and Gansu (Gannan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture).

Contents

Amdo Tibetan is one of the four main spoken Tibetic languages, the other three being Central Tibetan, Khams Tibetan and Ladakhi. These four related languages share a common written script but different in phonology, grammar and vocabulary. These differences may have emerged due to geographical isolation of the regions of Tibet. Unlike Standard Tibetan, Amdo language is not a tonal. It retains many word-initial consonant clusters that have been lost in Central Tibetan.

Dialects

Dialects are: [3]

Bradley (1997) [4] includes Thewo and Choni as close to Amdo if not actually Amdo dialects.

Hua (2001) [5] contains word lists of the Xiahe County 夏河, Tongren County 同仁, Xunhua County 循化, Hualong County 化隆, Hongyuan County 红原, and Tianjun County 天峻 dialects of Amdo Tibetan in Gansu and Qinghai provinces.

Media

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Diaspora

See also

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References

  1. Amdolese at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Amdo Tibetan". Glottolog 3.0 . Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  3. N. Tournadre (2005) "L'aire linguistique tibétaine et ses divers dialectes." Lalies, 2005, n°25, p. 7–56
  4. Bradley (1997) Archived December 8, 2006, at the Wayback Machine
  5. Hua Kan 华侃主编 (ed). 2001. Vocabulary of Amdo Tibetan dialects [藏语安多方言词汇]. Lanzhou: Gansu People's Press [甘肃民族出版社].
  6. 青海藏语广播网 མཚོ་སྔོན་བོད་སྐད་རླུང་འཕྲིན། - 青海藏语广播网 མཚོ་སྔོན་བོད་སྐད་རླུང་འཕྲིན།
  7. "བོད་སྐད་སྡེ་ཚན།". rfa.org.

Bibliography