Jackson's Warehouse

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Jackson's Warehouse (right) in 2010 Ancoats-Picadilly Basin Jacksons Warehouse Tariff Street- 4522.JPG
Jackson's Warehouse (right) in 2010

Jackson's Warehouse (also known as Jacksons Warehouse) is a nineteenth-century warehouse in the Piccadilly Basin area of Manchester.

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 as of 2017. It lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous built-up area, with a population of 3.2 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council.

Contents

History

Built in 1836, it was originally called the Rochdale Canal Warehouse. In 1961, it was still in use as a warehouse. [1] In 1974, it was listed as a Grade II* building. [2] [3] In 2003, a £4.25m restoration project converted the warehouse into residential accommodation and a restaurant. [4]

See also

Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester Wikimedia list article

There are 236 Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester, England. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade II* structures are those considered to be "particularly significant buildings of more than local interest". In England, the authority for listing under the Planning Act 1990 rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M1 postcode area of the city includes part of the city centre, in particular the Northern Quarter, the area known as Chinatown, and part of the district of Chorlton-on-Medlock. The postcode area contains 192 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, 14 are listed at Grade II*, the middle of the three grades, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade.

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Rochdale town in Greater Manchester, England

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Great Northern Warehouse

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Whitworth Street street in Manchester, United Kingdom

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Dale Street Warehouse

Dale Street Warehouse is an early nineteenth century warehouse in the Piccadilly Basin area of Manchester city centre. It is a Grade II* listed building as of 10 November 1972. "It is of considerable interest as the earliest surviving canal warehouse in the city" according to Clare Hartwell. The building is dated 1806 with initials "WC" on the datestone indicating that it was designed by William Crosley, an engineer who worked with William Jessop on the inner-Manchester canal system. Constructed of watershot millstone grit blocks, the four-storey building has timber floors, supported throughout by cast-iron columns, a feature which now makes it unique amongst Manchester warehouses. The base of the building incorporates four boatholes which allowed boats to unload their cargoes inside of the warehouse. The warehouse also incorporates a "subterranean wheel-pit containing a 16-foot water-wheel used to drive hoists both in this building and in a former warehouse to the south via a line-shaft tunnel which mostly survives beneath the car-park." For many years the building was a shop and was described in 2000 as "sadly neglected"; the warehouse has now been converted to office space and a café and renamed Carver's Warehouse.

Asia House, Manchester

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Lancaster House, Manchester

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India House, Manchester

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Tootal, Broadhurst and Lee Building, Manchester

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Portland Street, Manchester street in Manchester, United Kingdom

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Canada House, Manchester grade II listed architectural structure in Manchester, United kingdom

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107 Piccadilly building on Lena Street in Manchester, England

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50 Newton Street grade II listed former warehouse in Manchester, United kingdom

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Old Mill, Manchester

Old Mill, completed in 1798 as part of Murrays' Mills, is the oldest surviving cotton mill in Manchester, England. Sited on the Rochdale Canal in Ancoats, it was powered by a Boulton and Watt steam engine, and its narrow six-storey brick structure "came to typify the Manchester cotton mill". Old Mill was designated a Grade II* listed building on 20 June 1988.

Great Ancoats Street street in Manchester, United Kingdom

Great Ancoats Street is a street in the inner suburb of Ancoats, Manchester, England. Much of Great Ancoats Street was originally named Ancoats Lane and was the location of Ancoats Hall. The street passed through a thriving manufacturing area during the 19th century. It was in close proximity to the Ashton and Rochdale canals. A number of cotton mills built in the early and mid-Victorian period are nearby, some of which have been converted into residential or office buildings, such as Albion Mills. The Pin Mill Works at the junction with Fairfield Street was a late 18th-century pin works, that became a cotton mill run by J & J Thompson and works for dyeing and calico-printing. Brownsfield Mill, a Grade II* listed building, was built in 1825.

References

  1. "Canals, Bridgewater Canal survey, Manchester branch, Manchester, Jacksons Warehouse". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 14 May 2011.
  2. "Former Rochdale Canal Warehouse, Manchester". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 14 May 2011.
  3. "Listed buildings in Manchester by street (T)". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 14 May 2011.
  4. "Jackson's Warehouse". Engineering Timelines. Retrieved 14 May 2011.

Coordinates: 53°28′53″N2°13′50″W / 53.4815°N 2.2306°W / 53.4815; -2.2306 (Jackson's Warehouse)

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.