St. James Buildings, Manchester

Last updated
St James Buildings
St James's Building.jpg
General information
Status Complete
Type Office
Architectural style Edwardian Baroque [1]
Location Oxford Street, Manchester
Address 61-95 Oxford Street
Manchester
Greater Manchester
M1 6EJ
Coordinates 53°28′32″N2°14′30″W / 53.4755°N 2.2416°W / 53.4755; -2.2416 Coordinates: 53°28′32″N2°14′30″W / 53.4755°N 2.2416°W / 53.4755; -2.2416
Opened 1912 [1]
Client Calico Printers' Association Ltd
Owner Bruntwood
Height 60m [1]
Technical details
Floor count 9 [1]
Design and construction
Architect Clegg, Fryer & Penman
References
[1]

St James Buildings is a high-rise, Grade II listed building on Oxford Street, Manchester, England, completed in 1912. The building is Edwardian Baroque in style, has a Portland stone exterior and reaches a maximum height of 60m.

Manchester city centre central business district of the City of Manchester, England

Manchester city centre is the central business district of Manchester, England, within the boundaries of Trinity Way, Great Ancoats Street and Whitworth Street. The City Centre ward had a population of 17,861 at the 2011 census.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Edwardian Baroque architecture Neo-Baroque architectural style of many public buildings built in the British Empire during the Edwardian era

Edwardian Baroque is the Neo-Baroque architectural style of many public buildings built in the British Empire during the Edwardian era (1901–1910).

Contents

History

The building opened in 1912 as the headquarters of the Calico Printers' Association Ltd, a company formed in 1899 from the amalgamation of 46 textile printing companies and 13 textile merchants. Companies involved in the merger included F. W. Grafton & Co, Edmund Potter & Co, Hoyle's Prints Ltd, John Gartside & Co, F. W. Ashton & Co, Rossendale Printing Company, Hewit & Wingate Ltd, and the Thornliebank Company Ltd.

The Calico Printers' Association Ltd was a British textile company founded in 1899, from the amalgamation of 46 textile printing companies and 13 textile merchants. The industry had prospered in the latter half of the 19th century but the fierce competition led to a decline in quality and profit margins. Most of the leading companies in the industry decided to amalgamate in order "to preserve the tradition and standing of calico printing and to produce textiles of a high standard at reasonable prices." The company at its inception accounted for over 80% of Britain’s output of printed cloth.

In recent years,[ when? ] the building has been renovated and leased to businesses by its owner Bruntwood. [2] Notable lessees include Kaplan Financial Ltd, the General Medical Council, BPP Law School, and the Arup Manchester office who were based on the 8th floor [3] and the Medical Practitioner's Tribunal Service.

Bruntwood

Bruntwood is a family-owned property company offering office space, serviced offices, retail space and virtual offices in the north of England and Birmingham in the United Kingdom. They own several high-profile buildings in the Manchester area, as well as in Liverpool, Leeds and Birmingham. They own one-third of the office space in Manchester city centre and also donate 10% of all annual profits to arts, cultural and community charities.

Kaplan Financial Ltd

Kaplan Financial Ltd is a British company providing training in accountancy and financial services. It was founded in 1958. Kaplan Financial is part of Kaplan Inc., a subsidiary of The Washington Post Company. Kaplan Financial has more than 48,000 students a year, both in the UK and overseas. It offers courses in 28 training centres throughout the UK as well as home study and online learning.

General Medical Council healthcare regulator for medical profession in the UK

The General Medical Council (GMC) is a public body that maintains the official register of medical practitioners within the United Kingdom. Its chief responsibility is to "protect, promote and maintain the health and safety of the public" by controlling entry to the register, and suspending or removing members when necessary. It also sets the standards for medical schools in the UK. Membership of the register confers substantial privileges under Part VI of the Medical Act 1983. It is a criminal offence to make a false claim of membership. The GMC is supported by fees paid by its members, and it became a registered charity in 2001.

Architecture

The building is Edwardian Baroque in style, has a Portland stone exterior and reaches a maximum height of 60m. The architects Clegg, Fryer & Penman designed the long façade with three slightly protruding pavilions with grossly inflated pilasters and pediments; in the centre the principal pediment is topped by a stumpy tower which breaks through the cornice line. The lowest third of the façade is emphasized by rustication and by having a more elaborate arrangement of windows. [4]

Portland stone Limestone quarried on the Isle of Portland, Dorset, England

Portland stone is a limestone from the Tithonian stage of the Jurassic period quarried on the Isle of Portland, Dorset. The quarries consist of beds of white-grey limestone separated by chert beds. It has been used extensively as a building stone throughout the British Isles, notably in major public buildings in London such as St Paul's Cathedral and Buckingham Palace. Portland stone is also exported to many countries—being used for example in the United Nations headquarters building in New York City.

See also

Related Research Articles

Richard Cassels Irish architect

Richard Cassels, also known as Richard Castle, was an architect who ranks with Edward Lovett Pearce as one of the greatest architects working in Ireland in the 18th century. Cassels was born in 1690 in Kassel, Germany. Although German, his family were of French origin, and descended from the French-Netherlandish 'Du Ry' family, famous for the many architects among their number. A cousin Simon du Ry designed Schloss Wilhelmshöhe in Kassel.

Architecture of London

London is the second largest urban area – and largest city – in the European Union area; as the ancient city of Londinium founded in the first century CE and nearly continuously inhabited, it is not characterised by any single predominant architectural style but areas of the city exhibit very strong and influential urban qualities which have deeply influenced urban planning globally. Considered with the administrative capital of the City of Westminster, relatively few structures predate the Great Fire of 1666, with notable exceptions including the Tower of London, Westminster Abbey, Banqueting House, Queens House, portions of St James's Palace, London Charterhouse, Lambeth Palace and scattered Tudor survivals.

Architecture of Manchester

The architecture of Manchester demonstrates a rich variety of architectural styles. The city is a product of the Industrial Revolution and is known as the first modern, industrial city. Manchester is noted for its warehouses, railway viaducts, cotton mills and canals - remnants of its past when the city produced and traded goods. Manchester has minimal Georgian or medieval architecture to speak of and consequently has a vast array of 19th and early 20th-century architecture styles; examples include Palazzo, Neo-Gothic, Venetian Gothic, Edwardian baroque, Art Nouveau, Art Deco and the Neo-Classical.

Manchester One

Manchester One, formerly known as Portland Tower and previously St. Andrew's House, is a high-rise building in Manchester, England, owned by Bruntwood and let out as office space. The tower is located at 53 Portland Street from which it was named. The tower was one of the first high-rise buildings built in the 1960s and 1970s in the United Kingdom.

Henry Price (architect) British architect

John Henry Price – more commonly referred to as Henry Price – was the first person to hold the office of 'City Architect' in Manchester Corporation's newly created City Architect's Department of 1902. He was responsible for a number of well known Manchester landmarks, and is credited with influencing the design of other buildings constructed during his tenure, such as Manchester Fire Station.

Bridgewater House, Manchester warehouse in Manchester, England

Bridgewater House, Manchester is a packing and shipping warehouse at 58–60 Whitworth Street, Manchester, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

Liverpool Cotton Exchange Building

Liverpool Cotton Exchange Building is an office block in Old Hall Street, Liverpool, Merseyside, England. The commercial building, which originally had a Neoclassical façade, replaced the 19th-century cotton exchange in Exchange Flags in 1906. Between 1967 and 1969 the building's exterior was given a contemporary mid 20th century design.

Grand Hotel, Birmingham Grade II* listed Victorian hotel in the city centre of Birmingham, England

The Grand Hotel is a Grade II* listed Victorian hotel in the city centre of Birmingham, England. The hotel occupies the greater part of a block bounded by Colmore Row, Church Street, Barwick Street and Livery Street and overlooks St Philip's Cathedral and churchyard. Designed by architect Thomson Plevins, construction began in 1875 and the hotel opened in 1879. Extensions and extensive interior renovations were undertaken by prominent Birmingham architecture firm Martin & Chamberlain from 1890 to 1895. Interior renovations included the building of the Grosvenor Room which boasts rich and impressive Louis XIV style decoration.

Zacatecas Cathedral Church in Zacatecas, Mexico

The Zacatecas Cathedral is a Catholic church in Zacatecas City, Zacatecas, Mexico. It is the head temple of the Diocese of Zacatecas, and is dedicated to Our Lady of the Assumption. The cathedral is located in the historic city center, and was declared a World Heritage Site by Unesco. The main facade of the premises is known as one of the most outstanding examples of Baroque art in Mexico.

Theatre Royal, Manchester former theatre and cinema in Manchester, England

The Theatre Royal in Manchester, England, opened in 1845. Situated next to the Free Trade Hall, it is the oldest surviving theatre in Manchester. It was commissioned by Mancunian businessman John Knowles who wanted a theatre venue in the city.

Ship Canal House grade II listed architectural structure in Manchester, United kingdom

Ship Canal House is a building in Manchester, England, which was built in 1927 for the Manchester Ship Canal Company. The building is located on King Street, historically the centre for Manchester's banking industry.

Harry S. Fairhurst British architect

Harry S. Fairhurst was a prominent architect in Edwardian Manchester. He was responsible for many of the city's iconic warehouses and his commissions include Blackfriars House, headquarters of the Lancashire Cotton Corporation and Arkwright House, headquarters of the English Sewing Cotton Company.

Bank Chambers

Bank Chambers is an office building on Portland Street, Manchester, England. Its heavy and imposing appearance gives away its previous use as a bullion bank vault by the Bank of England. The Bank of England vacated the building in the 1990s and the building is now used as offices.

Kearsley Mill Bolton, Greater Manchester, M26

Kearsley Mill is a 240,000 sq ft, late period cotton mill located in the small village of Prestolee in Kearsley, Greater Manchester. A near complete example of Edwardian mill architecture, the building now functions as headquarters for a number of businesses and is still used in the continued manufacturing and distribution of textiles by Richard Haworth Ltd Est (1876), part of the Ruia Group. The mill is a Grade II listed building.

GIO Building

The GIO Building is a heritage-listed office tower located at 60-70 Elizabeth Street in the Sydney central business district in the City of Sydney local government area of New South Wales, Australia. It was built during 1929. It is also known as the General Insurance Office Building; the GIO building, and was constructed as the Sun Building or the Sun Newspaper Building. The property is privately owned and was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.

Brooklyn Hotel, The Rocks

The Brooklyn Hotel is a heritage-listed bar and restaurant and former hotel located at 229 George Street, in the inner city Sydney suburb of The Rocks in the City of Sydney local government area of New South Wales, Australia. It was designed by Walter Liberty Vernon and built in 1912. The property is owned by Property NSW, an agency of the Government of New South Wales. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 10 May 2002.

Johnsons Building, The Rocks

Johnson's Building is a heritage-listed former retail stores and now stock exchange offices, bar and restaurant located at 233-235 George Street in the inner city Sydney suburb of The Rocks in the City of Sydney local government area of New South Wales, Australia. It was designed by Walter Liberty Vernon and built in 1912. It is also known as Chamber of Commerce Building and Johnson's Overalls Building (Johnsons). The property is owned by Property NSW, an agency of the Government of New South Wales. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 10 May 2002.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "St James Buildings". skyscrapernews.com. Retrieved 2011-12-02.
  2. "St James'". Bruntwood. Retrieved 2011-12-02.
  3. "Manchester - Arup". Arup. Retrieved 2011-12-02.
  4. Atkins, Philip (1976) Guide across Manchester. Manchester: Civic Trust for the North West ISBN   0-901347-29-9; p. 99