University of Notre Dame Australia

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The University of Notre Dame Australia
University of Notre Dame Australia Logo.svg
MottoIn principio erat Verbum
Motto in English
"In the beginning was the Word"
Type Private
Established1989
Religious affiliation
Roman Catholic
Chancellor Chris Ellison
Vice-Chancellor Peter Tranter (acting) [1]
Location,
32°3′24″S115°44′37″E / 32.05667°S 115.74361°E / -32.05667; 115.74361 Coordinates: 32°3′24″S115°44′37″E / 32.05667°S 115.74361°E / -32.05667; 115.74361
CampusUrban
Affiliations
Website notredame.edu.au

The University of Notre Dame Australia is a national Roman Catholic private university with campuses in Fremantle and Broome in Western Australia, and Sydney in New South Wales. The university also has eight clinical schools as part of its School of Medicine located across Sydney, Melbourne, and in regional NSW and Victoria. [2]

Private universities are typically not operated by governments, although many receive tax breaks, public student loans, and grants. Depending on their location, private universities may be subject to government regulation. This is in contrast to public universities and national universities. Many private universities are non-profit organizations.

Broome, Western Australia Town in Western Australia

Broome is a coastal, pearling and tourist town in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, 1,681 km (1,045 mi) north of Perth. The urban population was 14,445 in June 2018 growing to over 45,000 per month during the peak tourist season.

Western Australia State in Australia

Western Australia is a state occupying the entire western third of Australia. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean to the north and west, and the Southern Ocean to the south, the Northern Territory to the north-east, and South Australia to the south-east. Western Australia is Australia's largest state, with a total land area of 2,529,875 square kilometres, and the second-largest country subdivision in the world, surpassed only by Russia's Sakha Republic. The state has about 2.6 million inhabitants – around 11 percent of the national total – of whom the vast majority live in the south-west corner, 79 per cent of the population living in the Perth area, leaving the remainder of the state sparsely populated.

Contents

Notre Dame is not part of the WA Tertiary Institutions Service Centre (TISC) or the NSW Universities Admissions Centre and students apply directly to the university through its admissions process. [3]

Tertiary Institutions Service Centre (TISC) is an incorporated administrative agency involved with the processing of applications for admission to undergraduate programmes for Western Australian state universities.

Universities Admissions Centre organization

The Universities Admissions Centre Pty Ltd (UAC) is the organisation that processes centralised applications for admission to tertiary education courses at participating institutions, mainly in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory. A not-for-profit company incorporated in July 1995, it has offices located at Sydney Olympic Park.

The university crest is an open Bible. The waves below the open Bible represents the Fremantle area, where the University was founded, and Australia, a nation surrounded by water. [4]

Bible Collection of religious texts in Judaism and Christianity

The Bible is a collection of sacred texts or scriptures. Varying parts of the Bible are considered to be a product of divine inspiration and a record of the relationship between God and humans by Christians, Jews, Samaritans, and Rastafarians.

Australia Country in Oceania

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous smaller islands. It is the largest country in Oceania and the world's sixth-largest country by total area. The neighbouring countries are Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, and East Timor to the north; the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu to the north-east; and New Zealand to the south-east. The population of 25 million is highly urbanised and heavily concentrated on the eastern seaboard. Australia's capital is Canberra, and its largest city is Sydney. The country's other major metropolitan areas are Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, and Adelaide.

History

In 1945, Father Patrick Duffy, an American navy chaplain, met Cardinal Norman Thomas Gilroy, Archbishop of Sydney, to discuss the possibility of the University of Notre Dame and the Congregation of Holy Cross being involved in the establishment of the first private Catholic university in Australia. [5]

Norman Thomas Gilroy Catholic cardinal

Sir Norman Thomas Gilroy was an Australian archbishop. He was the first Australian-born cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church.

University of Notre Dame Private Catholic university in Notre Dame, Indiana, United States

The University of Notre Dame du Lac is a private Catholic research university in Notre Dame, Indiana, outside the city of South Bend. The main campus covers 1,261 acres (510 ha) in a suburban setting and it contains a number of recognizable landmarks, such as the Golden Dome, the Word of Life mural, the Notre Dame Stadium, and the Basilica. The school was founded on November 26, 1842, by Edward Sorin, who was also its first president.

Congregation of Holy Cross organization

The Congregation of Holy Cross or Congregatio a Sancta Cruce (C.S.C.) is a Catholic congregation of missionary priests and brothers founded in 1837 by Blessed Basil Moreau, in Le Mans, France.

At the time, there were roughly 1.5 million Catholics living in Australia [6] and an established network of Catholic primary and secondary schools. Cardinal Gilroy believed that there was a strong appetite for a Catholic university and that it would enable the education of an “elite Catholic laity that had been the glory of the church in the United States”. [7]

Catholic education in Australia

Catholic education in Australia refers to the education services provided by the Roman Catholic Church in Australia within the Australian education system. From 18th century foundations, the Catholic education system has grown to be the second biggest provider of school-based education in Australia, after government schools. The Catholic Church has established primary, secondary and tertiary educational institutions in Australia. As of 2018, one in five Australian students attend Catholic schools. There are over 1,700 Catholic schools in Australia with more than 750,000 students enrolled, employing almost 60,000 teachers.

The project was pursued for a number of years and property was purchased in Sydney on behalf of Holy Cross in 1948, [8] but ultimately the Charter to establish the university was never acquired and the endeavour was abandoned in 1953. [9]

In the mid-1980s, concerns were raised that State universities were not able to properly train lay teachers to work in Catholic primary and secondary schools in Western Australia. [10] The idea of a private Catholic university again surfaced, this time on the opposite side of the Australian continent.

Peter Tannock, who headed the Catholic Education Office of Western Australia, discussed these concerns with William Foley, Archbishop of Perth. [10] They enlisted the help of Denis Horgan, a local Catholic businessman and founder of Leeuwin Estate, who they hoped would provide financial assistance in establishing the university. [10]

Horgan was supportive of the idea, as long as the institution would provide more than teacher education. [10] A small Planning Committee with Tannock, Horgan, Foley and Michael Quinlan, a Catholic physician, was established and developed the plan for a Catholic university with a number of sites in Western Australia that would provide medical and nursing education, among other fields. [10]

The University was created through the University of Notre Dame Australia Act 1989 in the Parliament of Western Australia. [11] The Act was given assent on 9 January 1990, the university was inaugurated on 2 July 1991 and classes commenced in February 1992. The first College, the College of Education, had 35 postgraduate students in this first year and the University of Notre Dame (US) sent 25 study abroad students to spend a semester at the Fremantle campus. [12]

The Broome Campus, originally known as the Kimberley Centre, was opened in 1994 in service of the Church and Aboriginal communities in the Kimberley region. [13] In 2006, the Sydney Campus was formally opened with an initial enrollment of 450 students. [14]

Campuses

St Benedict's Church and University of Notre Dame, Sydney Chippendale University of Notre Dame.JPG
St Benedict's Church and University of Notre Dame, Sydney
Westpac Bank building, one of the many buildings in Fremantle's west end restored and used by UNDA Freo gnangarra-108.jpg
Westpac Bank building, one of the many buildings in Fremantle's west end restored and used by UNDA

Notre Dame has campuses located in Fremantle and Broome in Western Australia. The university's Sydney campus is spread across two sites – one based in Broadway and the other in Darlinghurst adjacent to the St Vincent's Hospital.

The Fremantle campus is located in the historic West End of the city, a designated heritage precinct famous for its late Georgian and Victorian-style architecture. [15] The university has rejuvenated much of the West End and has worked to restore the traditional architecture of the precinct, occupying 50 properties since its establishment in 1992 and restoring many buildings. [15] [16] [17] Due to the presence of Notre Dame, Fremantle is commonly referred to as a “university town” [18] [19] [20] much like older university towns in Europe and is the only one of its kind in Australia.

The School of Medicine Sydney has eight clinical schools in Sydney, Melbourne and in rural locations across the east coast.

The Sydney Clinical School is located across St Vincent's & Mater Clinical School at St Vincent's Hospital, Auburn Clinical School at Auburn Hospital and Hawkesbury Clinical School at Hawkesbury Health Service. The Melbourne Clinical School is located at the Werribee Mercy Hospital.

The Rural Clinical Schools are located at Lithgow Clinical School at Lithgow Hospital, Ballarat Clinical School at St John of God Hospital Ballarat, Riverina Regional Training Hub (RRTH) and Wagga Wagga Clinical School at Calvary Health Care Riverina.

Organisation and administration

The university has three campuses offering courses in the following schools: [21]

The university is a self-accrediting institution and is subject to regular quality audits and registration processes undertaken by the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency. [22]

The governance structure of Notre Dame is determined largely by its enabling act of parliament and its statutes. These specify the source, role and functions of its trustees, board of directors and board of governors and the principal officers and academic leaders of the university. [23]

Academics

All undergraduate students must undertake courses in theology, philosophy and ethics. This is known as the core curriculum in Fremantle, [24] and the LOGOS programme in Sydney. [25]

Notre Dame's medicine students study a core course, bioethics, whilst students on the Broome campus study Aboriginal people and spirituality as part of their degree. [26]

Research

Notre Dame has three institutes for scholarship and research located across its Campuses.

The Institute for Health Research draws on the clinical expertise within Notre Dame's Schools of Health Sciences, Medicine, Nursing & Midwifery and Physiotherapy to develop research partnerships and projects that support the healthy ageing of all Australians. Nulungu collaborates with national and international universities, government and Indigenous Australian communities to develop research outcomes of benefit to the country's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The Institute for Ethics and Society pursues philosophical and interdisciplinary research across five core areas: applied and professional ethics; ethics education; bioethics; religion and global society; and Indigenous research and ethics. [27]

The university is one of the partners in the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study, one of the largest cohorts of pregnancy, childhood, adolescence and early adulthood to be carried out anywhere in the world. [28]

Student life

Tannock Hall Fremantle Notre Dame Tannock Hall.jpg
Tannock Hall

The Sydney and Fremantle Campus both have representative student associations, created to represent all the students at each campus. The Sydney Campus is home to the Student Association of the University of Notre Dame Australia (SAUNDA), while the Fremantle Campus hosts the Notre Dame Student Association (NDSA). These organisations are currently not recognised in the University statues, making them Student Associations and not Guilds.

Mass is celebrated each weekday and on Sunday evening on the Fremantle campus, [29] weekdays on the Sydney campus, [30] and on Wednesdays on the Broome campus. [31]

The student population across Australia at Notre Dame campuses numbers 12,394 as of February 2018, 6,544 of these being in Fremantle, 5,685 in Sydney and 165 in Broome. [32]

Libraries

Notre Dame has six individual libraries across the three campuses: St Teresa's Library, Galvin Medical Library, and Craven Law Library at the Fremantle campus; Benedict XVI Medical Library (Darlinghurst) and St Benedict's Library (Broadway) at the Sydney Campus; and Broome Campus Library at the Broome Campus. [33]

St Teresa's Library

St Teresa's Library, located at 34 Mouat Street, Fremantle, is a heritage listed building in the West End and supports the programs of the Schools of Arts & Sciences, Business, Education and Philosophy & Theology. [34] Built on land first owned by John Bateman, the building was originally a warehouse for Bateman Hardware. [34] The building was first adapted to become a university library in 1994 when only limited, low cost adaptive re-use works could be afforded, and was renovated again in 2011 to provide maximum floor area. [35]

Galvin Medical Library

Galvin Medical Library, located at 38-40 Henry Street, Fremantle, is contained within the School of Medicine, a heritage listed building. [36] The library supports the Schools of Medicine, Nursing, Physiotherapy and Health Sciences. Constructed from 1900 onward, the building was known as Fowler's Warehouse and served as the principle premises in Western Australia for D. & J. Fowler Ltd., the wholesale grocery company. The library was opened in 2005 after Notre Dame took over the lease of the buildings from the City of Fremantle. [37]

Craven Law Library

Like St Teresa's Library, Craven Law Library is located in the former Bateman family warehouse complex between Mouat and Henry Streets in Fremantle. The library was established in 1997, but renamed the Craven Law Library in 2003 to commemorate the Foundation Dean of the School of Law, Greg Craven. The library supports the School of Law and contains a print collection in excess of 30,000 volumes, including historic primary materials. [38]

Benedict XVI Medical Library

Benedict XVI Medical Library, located at 160 Oxford Street, Darlinghurst, is housed next to the Sacred Heart Catholic Church in a building originally occupied by a Catholic school run by the Sisters of Charity of Australia. [39] The building was taken over by Notre Dame in 2004-05 [39] and supports the Schools of Medicine and Nursing. [40] It was named in honour of Pope Benedict XVI during a visit he made to the university and library on 18 July 2008. [40]

Notable people

The current and fifth chancellor of the university, serving since 2017, is Chris Ellison, a WA-based former Senator. [41] The vice-chancellor and chief executive officer of the University from 2008 until February 2019 was Celia Hammond, a former lawyer who resigned to seek election to federal parliament. [42] [43] The future Vice Chancellor is Francis Campbell (commencing January 2020).

Chancellors

Neville John Owen20052008 [44]
Michael Quinlan20082011 [45]
Terence Tobin20112017 [46]
Chris Ellison2017present [47]

Vice-Chancellors

David Link19901992 [48]
Peter Tannock19922008 [49]
Celia Hammond20082019 [50]
Francis Campbellcommencing January 2020 [50]

See also

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