Benjamin, Texas

Last updated
Benjamin, Texas
City

Knox County Courthouse, Benjamin, Texas.jpg

Knox County Courthouse in Benjamin
TXMap-doton-Benjamin.PNG
Location of Benjamin, Texas
Knox County Benjamin.svg
Coordinates: 33°35′0″N99°47′36″W / 33.58333°N 99.79333°W / 33.58333; -99.79333 Coordinates: 33°35′0″N99°47′36″W / 33.58333°N 99.79333°W / 33.58333; -99.79333
Country United States
State Texas
County Knox
Incorporated (city) 1928
Government
  Type Council-Manager
  Misty Weiser Manager
Area
  Total 1.0 sq mi (2.7 km2)
  Land 1.0 sq mi (2.7 km2)
  Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 1,476 ft (450 m)
Population (2010)
  Total 258
  Density 258.0/sq mi (95.6/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
  Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 79505
Area code(s) 940
FIPS code 48-07636 [1]
GNIS feature ID 1351877 [2]

Benjamin is a city in Knox County, Texas, United States. It is the county seat of Knox County. [3] The population was 258 at the 2010 census.

Knox County, Texas County in the United States

Knox County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 3,719. Its county seat is Benjamin. The county was created in 1858 and later organized in 1886. It is named for Henry Knox, an American Revolutionary War general.

Texas State of the United States of America

Texas is the second largest state in the United States by both area and population. Geographically located in the South Central region of the country, Texas shares borders with the U.S. states of Louisiana to the east, Arkansas to the northeast, Oklahoma to the north, New Mexico to the west, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas to the southwest, while the Gulf of Mexico is to the southeast.

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in Canada, China, Romania, Taiwan and the United States. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.

Contents

History

The community was founded in 1884 by Hilory G. Bedford, president and controlling stockholder in the Wichita and Brazos Stock Company. He named it Benjamin after his son, who had been killed by lightning. [4] [5] To attract additional settlers, Bedford gave his stockholders a 50-acre tract of land and set aside 40 more acres for a town square. Benjamin was designed as the Knox County seat when it was organized in 1886. A school opened in 1886, as well. A jail built in 1887 still stands as a private residence and the old bank stands next to the sheriff's office. [5] Benjamin was incorporated in 1928 and the population was 485 in the 1930 census. [4] Two structures in the community, a courthouse (1938) and school building (1942), were constructed with Works Projects Administration labor. That courthouse replaced the previous stone structure built in 1888. The number of inhabitants reached a high of 599 in 1940, but that figure slowly decreased during the latter half of the 20th century.

Geography

Benjamin is situated at the junction of U.S. Highway 82 and State Highway 6 in central Knox County, approximately 90 miles north of Abilene and 85 miles southwest of Wichita Falls. [6]

U.S. Route 82 highway in the United States

U.S. Route 82 is an east–west United States highway in the Southern United States. Created on July 1, 1931 across central Mississippi and southern Arkansas, US 82 eventually became a 1,625-mile (2,615 km) route extending from the White Sands of New Mexico to Georgia's Atlantic coast.

Texas State Highway 6 highway in Texas

State Highway 6 runs from the Red River, the Texas–Oklahoma boundary, to northwest of Galveston, where it is known as the Old Galveston Highway. In Sugar Land and Missouri City, it is known as Alvin-Sugarland Road and runs perpendicular to I-69/US 59. In the Houston area, it runs north to FM 1960, then northwest along US Highway 290 to Hempstead, and south to Westheimer Road and Addicks, and is known as Addicks Satsuma Road. In the Bryan–College Station area, it is known as the Earl Rudder Freeway. In Hearne, it is known as Market Street. In Calvert, it is known as Main Street. For most of its length, SH 6 is not a limited-access road.

Abilene, Texas City in Texas, United States

Abilene is a city in Taylor and Jones counties in Texas, United States. The population was 117,463 at the 2010 census, making it the 27th-most populous city in the state of Texas. It is the principal city of the Abilene Metropolitan Statistical Area, which had a 2017 estimated population of 170,219. It is the county seat of Taylor County. Dyess Air Force Base is located on the west side of the city.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.0 square mile (2.6 km2), all of it land.

United States Census Bureau bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Climate

According to the Köppen climate classification system, Benjamin has a semiarid climate, BSk on climate maps. [7]

Köppen climate classification widely used climate classification system

The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. It was first published by the Russian climatologist Wladimir Köppen (1846–1940) in 1884, with several later modifications by Köppen, notably in 1918 and 1936. Later, the climatologist Rudolf Geiger introduced some changes to the classification system, which is thus sometimes called the Köppen–Geiger climate classification system.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 485
1940 59923.5%
1950 530−11.5%
1960 338−36.2%
1970 308−8.9%
1980 257−16.6%
1990 225−12.5%
2000 26417.3%
2010 258−2.3%
Est. 2016264 [8] 2.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [9]
Water tower in Benjamin Benjamin Texas water tower.JPG
Water tower in Benjamin

As of the census [1] of 2000, 264 people, 97 households, and 64 families resided in the city. The population density was 254.5 people per square mile (98.0/km2). The 119 housing units averaged 114.7 per square mile (44.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 89.77% White, 3.03% African American, 1.89% Asian, 4.92% from other races, and 0.38% from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 11.36% of the population.

Census Acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population

A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agriculture, business, and traffic censuses. The United Nations defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years. United Nations recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practice.

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

Of the 97 households, 36.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.5% were married couples living together, 14.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.0% were not families; 30.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 19.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.31.

In the city, the population was distributed as 33.3% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 19.7% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 88.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $31,023, and for a family was $38,125. Males had a median income of $29,750 versus $19,375 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,138. About 14.5% of families and 14.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.7% of those under the age of 18 and 8.7% of those 65 or over.

Arts and culture

The Knox County Museum, located in the county courthouse, features a barbed wire exhibit and numerous other frontier artifacts. The Knox County Veterans Memorial, located at the corner of U.S. Highway 82 and State Highway 6, honors all Knox County veterans from the Spanish–American War through current conflicts.

Benjamin's Moorhouse Park, dedicated by the state highway department in 1965, and an area know the Narrows located four miles east of the city are also popular tourist attractions. [4]

Texas photographer Wyman Meinzer lives in Benjamin.

Education

The city of Benjamin is served by the Benjamin Independent School District and home to the Benjamin High School Mustangs.

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  2. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  4. 1 2 3 "Benjamin, Texas". The Handbook of Texas online. Retrieved 2009-08-03.
  5. 1 2 "History". Benjamin Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved 2009-08-03.
  6. "Benjamin, Texas". Texas Escapes Online Magazine. Retrieved 2009-08-03.
  7. Climate Summary for Benjamin, Texas
  8. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  9. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.