Psalm 90

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Psalm 90 is the 90th psalm from the Book of Psalms. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 89 in a slightly different numbering system. Unique among the Psalms, it is attributed to Moses, thus making it the first Psalm to be written chronologically. The Psalm is well known for its reference to human life expectancy being 70 or 80 ("threescore years and ten", or "if by reason of strength ... fourscore years" in the King James Version), although the Psalm's attributed author, Moses, lived to 120 years, according to Biblical tradition. [1]

Septuagint Greek translation of Hebrew scriptures

The Septuagint is the earliest extant Greek translation of the Hebrew scriptures from the original Hebrew. It is estimated that the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, known as the Torah or Pentateuch, were translated in the mid-3rd century BCE and the remaining texts were translated in the 2nd century BCE. Considered the primary Greek translation of the Old Testament, it is quoted a number of times in the New Testament,particularly in the Pauline epistles,by the Apostolic Fathers, and later by the Greek Church Fathers.

Vulgate Latin translation of the Bible

The Vulgate is a late-4th-century Latin translation of the Bible that became the Catholic Church's officially promulgated Latin version of the Bible during the 16th century. The translation was largely the work of Jerome, who in 382 had been commissioned by Pope Damasus I to revise the Vetus Latina Gospels then in use by the Roman Church. Jerome, on his own initiative, extended this work of revision and translation to include most of the books of the Bible, and once published, the new version was widely adopted and eventually eclipsed the Vetus Latina; so that by the 13th century, it had taken over from the former version the appellation of versio vulgata or vulgata for short, and in Greek as βουλγάτα ("Voulgata").

Moses person, mentioned in the Torah (Pentateuch) and in the Quran, who led the Israelites out of slavery in Egypt to Canaan

Moses was a prophet according to the teachings of the Abrahamic religions. Scholarly consensus sees Moses as a legendary figure, although retaining the possibility that a Moses-like figure existed.

Contents

Uses

Judaism

Shabbat Jewish day of rest; Jewish Sabbath

Shabbat or Shabbos, or the Sabbath is Judaism's day of rest and seventh day of the week, on which religious Jews, Samaritans and certain Christians remember the Biblical creation of the heavens and the earth in six days and the Exodus of the Hebrews, and look forward to a future Messianic Age. Shabbat observance entails refraining from work activities, often with great rigor, and engaging in restful activities to honor the day. Judaism's traditional position is that unbroken seventh-day Shabbat originated among the Jewish people, as their first and most sacred institution, though some suggest other origins. Variations upon Shabbat are widespread in Judaism and, with adaptations, throughout the Abrahamic and many other religions.

Jewish holidays Wikimedia list article

Jewish holidays, also known as Jewish festivals or Yamim Tovim, are holidays observed in Judaism and by Jews throughout the Hebrew calendar. They include religious, cultural and national elements, derived from three sources: Biblical mitzvot ("commandments"); rabbinic mandates; Jewish history and the history of the State of Israel.

Hoshana Rabbah 7th day of Sukkot; 21st of Tishrei

The seventh day of the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, 21st day of Tishrei, is known as Hoshana Rabbah. This day is marked by a special synagogue service, the Hoshana Rabbah, in which seven circuits are made by the worshippers with their lulav and etrog, while the congregation recites Hoshanot. It is customary for the scrolls of the Torah to be removed from the ark during this procession. In a few communities a shofar is sounded after each circuit.

Psalm 90 is one of the ten Psalms of the Tikkun HaKlali of Rebbe Nachman of Breslov. [6] [7]

Tikkun HaKlali, also known as The General Remedy, is a set of ten Psalms whose recital serves as teshuvah (repentance) for all sins — in particular the sin of wasted seed through involuntary nocturnal emission or masturbation. The Tikkun HaKlali is a unique innovation of Rebbe Nachman of Breslov, and its recital is a regular practice of Breslover Hasidim to this day.

Nachman of Breslov Ukrainian rabbi

Nachman of Breslov, also known as Reb Nachman of Bratslav, Reb Nachman Breslover, Nachman from Uman, was the founder of the Breslov Hasidic movement.

New Testament

Christianity

Isaac Watts English hymnwriter, theologian and logician

Isaac Watts was an English Christian minister (Congregational), hymn writer, theologian, and logician. He was a prolific and popular hymn writer and is credited with some 750 hymns. He is recognized as the "Godfather of English Hymnody"; many of his hymns remain in use today and have been translated into numerous languages.

Related Research Articles

Psalm 89 is the 89th psalm in the biblical Book of Psalms, part of the Hebrew Bible. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 88 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 103 psalm

Psalm 103 is the 103rd psalm in the biblical Book of Psalms. The first verse attributes it to King David, the author of many Psalms. It is a hymn, beginning in English "Bless the Lord, O my soul" (KJV). J. A. Motyer of Trinity College, Bristol describes it thus: "The blend of changeless fatherly care and endless sovereign rule is the distinctive stress of this Psalm." In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 102 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 98 psalm

Psalm 98 is the 98th psalm of the Book of Psalms, generally known in English by its first verse, in the King James Version, "O sing unto the Lord a new song; for he hath done marvellous things". The Book of Psalms is the third section of the Hebrew Bible, and a book of the Christian Old Testament. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 97 in a slightly different numbering system. In Latin, it is known as "Cantate Domino". The psalm is a hymn psalm, one of the Royal Psalms, praising God as the King of His people.

Psalm 95 psalm

Psalm 95 is part of the biblical Book of Psalms. It is one of the Royal Psalms, Psalm 93-99, praising God as the King of His people. Psalm 95 identifies no author, but Hebrews 4:7 attributes it to David. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 94 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 20 psalm

Psalm 20 is the 20th psalm of the Book of Psalms. It is internally attributed to King David. In the International Critical Commentary series, Charles and Emilie Briggs suggest that it was written during the reign of Jehoshaphat.

Psalm 10 psalm

Psalm 10 is the 10th psalm from the Book of Psalms.

Psalm 29 psalm

Psalm 29 is the 29th psalm from the Book of Psalms.

Psalm 33 is the 33rd psalm from the Book of Psalms. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 32 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 136

Psalm 136 is the 136th psalm of the biblical Book of Psalms. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 135 in a slightly different numbering system. It is sometimes referred to as "The Great Hallel".

Psalm 135

Psalm 135 is the 135th psalm of the biblical Book of Psalms. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 134 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 132

Psalm 132 is the 132nd psalm of the biblical Book of Psalms. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 131 in a slightly different numbering system. It is the longest of 15 psalms which begin with the words "A song of ascents".

Psalm 128

Psalm 128 is the 128th psalm of the Book of Psalms in the Old Testament. It is one of fifteen psalms which begins with the words "A song of ascents". It contains only six verses, and discusses the blessed state of those who follow Yahweh. Its opening words in the King James Version are "Blessed is every one that feareth the LORD; that walketh in his ways". In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 127 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 123 psalm

Psalm 123 is the 123rd psalm of the biblical Book of Psalms. It is one of 15 psalms that begins with the words "A song of ascents". In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 122 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 68

Psalm 68 is the 68th psalm of the Book of Psalms. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 67 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 78 is the 78th psalm in the biblical Book of Psalms. It is one of the 12 Psalms of Asaph and is described as a "maskil". It is the second-longest Psalm, second only to Psalm 119 in length. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 77 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 81 is the 81st psalm in the biblical Book of Psalms. Its themes relate to celebration and repentance. In the New King James Version its sub-title is "An Appeal for Israel's Repentance". In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 80 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 94 is the 94th psalm in the biblical Book of Psalms. One of the Royal Psalms, Psalm 93-99, praising God as the King of His people. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 93 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 99 is 99th psalm in the biblical Book of Psalms. The last of the set of Royal Psalms, Psalm 93-99, praising God as the King of His people. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 98 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 105 psalm

Psalm 105 is the 105th psalm of the biblical Book of Psalms. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 104 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 106 psalm

Psalm 106 is the 106th psalm of the biblical Book of Psalms. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 105 in a slightly different numbering system.

References

  1. https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Deuteronomy+34%3A7&version=NASB
  2. The Complete Artscroll Siddur page 378
  3. The Artscroll Tehillim page 329
  4. The Complete Artscroll Siddur page 595
  5. The Complete Artscroll Siddur page 291
  6. Weintraub, Rabbi Simkha Y. (2018). "Psalms as the Ultimate Self-Help Tool". My Jewish Learning. Retrieved September 25, 2018.
  7. Greenbaum, Rabbi Avraham (2007). "The Ten Psalms: English Translation". azamra.org. Retrieved September 25, 2018.
  8. Kirkpatrick, A. F. (1901). The Book of Psalms: with Introduction and Notes. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Book IV and V: Psalms XC-CL. Cambridge: At the University Press. p. 839. Retrieved February 28, 2019.