Psalm 90

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Psalm 90 is the 90th psalm from the Book of Psalms. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 89 in a slightly different numbering system. Unique among the Psalms, it is attributed to Moses, thus making it the first Psalm to be written chronologically. The Psalm is well known for its reference to human life expectancy being 70 or 80 ("threescore years and ten", or "if by reason of strength ... fourscore years" in the King James Version), although the Psalm's attributed author, Moses, lived to 120 years, according to Biblical tradition. [1]

Contents

Uses

Judaism

New Testament

Christianity

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Psalm 130 psalm

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Psalm 24 psalm

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Psalm 8 psalm

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Psalm 19 psalm

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Psalm 33 is the 33rd psalm from the Book of Psalms. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 32 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 34 psalm

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Psalm 144

Psalm 144 is the 144th psalm of the biblical Book of Psalms in the Masoretic and modern numbering. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate/Vulgata Clementina, this psalm is Psalm 143 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 132

Psalm 132 is the 132nd psalm of the biblical Book of Psalms. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 131 in a slightly different numbering system. It is the longest of 15 psalms which begin with the words "A song of ascents".

Psalm 68

Psalm 68 is the 68th psalm of the Book of Psalms. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 67 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 99 psalm

Psalm 99 is 99th psalm in the biblical Book of Psalms. The last of the set of Royal Psalms, Psalm 93-99, praising God as the King of His people. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 98 in a slightly different numbering system.

Psalm 105 psalm

Psalm 105 is the 105th psalm of the biblical Book of Psalms. In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 104 in a slightly different numbering system. Verses 1-15 are largely reproduced as 1 Chronicles 16:8-22.

Psalm 115 psalm

Psalm 115 is the 115th psalm of the biblical Book of Psalms. It is part of the Egyptian Hallel sequence in the Book of Psalms.

References

  1. Deuteronomy 34:7
  2. Zlotowitz 1990, p. 378.
  3. Danziger & Scherman 1989, p. 329.
  4. Zlotowitz 1990, p. 595.
  5. Zlotowitz 1990, p. 291.
  6. Weintraub, Rabbi Simkha Y. (2018). "Psalms as the Ultimate Self-Help Tool". My Jewish Learning. Retrieved September 25, 2018.
  7. Greenbaum, Rabbi Avraham (2007). "The Ten Psalms: English Translation". azamra.org. Retrieved September 25, 2018.
  8. Kirkpatrick 1901.