2012 United States Senate election in Tennessee

Last updated

2012 United States Senate election in Tennessee
Flag of Tennessee.svg
  2006 November 6, 2012 2018  
Turnout52.2% Increase2.svg
  Bob Corker official Senate photo (cropped).jpg 3x4.svg
Nominee Bob Corker Mark Clayton
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote1,506,443705,882
Percentage64.9%30.4%

2012 United States Senate election in Tennessee results map by county.svg
County results
Corker:      40–50%     50–60%     60–70%     70–80%     80–90%
Clayton:      50–60%

U.S. senator before election

Bob Corker
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Bob Corker
Republican

The 2012 United States Senate election in Tennessee took place on November 6, 2012, as part of the general election including the 2012 U.S. presidential election, elections to the House of Representatives and various state and local elections. Incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Bob Corker won a second term, narrowly flipping reliably Democratic Davidson County home to Nashville which has not voted Republican on a presidential level since 1988. He faced Democratic nominee Mark E. Clayton [1] as well as several third-party candidates and several independents in this election.

Contents

Corker easily won the Republican primary with 85% of the vote, and Clayton won the Democratic nomination with 30% of the vote, despite raising no money and having a website that was four years out of date. [2] The next day Tennessee's Democratic Party disavowed the candidate over his active role in the Public Advocate of the United States, which they described as a "known hate group". They blamed his victory among candidates for whom the TNDP provided little forums to become known on the fact that his name appeared first on the ballot, and said they would do nothing to help his campaign, urging Democrats to vote for "the write-in candidate of their choice" in November. [3] One of the Democratic candidates, Larry Crim, filed a petition seeking to offer the voters a new primary in which to select a Democratic nominee among the remaining candidates the party had affirmed as bona fide and as a preliminary motion sought a temporary restraining order against certification of the results, but after a judge denied the temporary order Crim withdrew his petition. [4]

Background

The incumbent in the race, former Chattanooga mayor Bob Corker, was elected in 2006 with 50.7% of the vote in a win against U.S. representative Harold Ford, Jr..

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared

  • Fred R. Anderson
  • Mark Twain Clemens, unemployed
  • Bob Corker, incumbent U.S. Senator
  • James Durkan, businessman
  • Brenda Lenard, businesswoman & doctoral student
  • Zach Poskevich, technology consultant

Polling

Hypothetical polling
Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Bob
Corker
More conservative
challenger
OtherUndecided
Public Policy Polling February 9–13, 2011400±4.9%38%43%19%
Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Bob
Corker
Marsha
Blackburn
OtherUndecided
Public Policy Polling February 9–13, 2011400±4.9%50%30%20%
Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Bob
Corker
Hank
Williams, Jr.
OtherUndecided
Public Policy Polling February 9–13, 2011400±4.9%66%13%21%

Results

Republican primary results [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Bob Corker (incumbent) 389,483 85.1
Republican Zach Poskevich28,2996.2
Republican Fred Anderson15,9423.6
Republican Mark Twain Clemens11,7882.6
Republican Brenda Lenard11,3782.5
Total votes456,890 100

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared

Results

Results by county:
.mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}
Mark Clayton
Gary G. Davis
Park Overall
David Hancock Tennessee Democratic U.S. Senate primary results by county, 2012.svg
Results by county:
  Mark Clayton
  Gary G. Davis
  Park Overall
  David Hancock
Democratic primary results [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Mark E. Clayton 48,126 30.0
Democratic Gary Gene Davis24,78915.4
Democratic Park Overall24,26315.1
Democratic Larry Crim17,38311.0
Democratic Benjamin Roberts16,36910.2
Democratic David Hancock16,16710.0
Democratic Thomas Owens13,3668.3
Total votes160,331 100

General election

Candidates

Predictions

SourceRankingAs of
The Cook Political Report [11] Solid RNovember 1, 2012
Sabato's Crystal Ball [12] Safe RNovember 5, 2012
Rothenberg Political Report [13] Safe RNovember 2, 2012
Real Clear Politics [14] Safe RNovember 5, 2012

Polling

Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Bob
Corker (R)
Mark
Clayton (D)
OtherUndecided
Issues and Answers Network Inc. October 16–21, 2011609±4%59%21%4%15%
Hypothetical polling
Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Bob
Corker (R)
Phil
Bredesen (D)
OtherUndecided
Public Policy Polling February 9–13, 2011500±4.4%41%46%12%
Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Bob
Corker (R)
Jim
Cooper (D)
OtherUndecided
Public Policy Polling February 9–13, 2011500±4.4%50%32%22%
Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Bob
Corker (R)
Harold
Ford, Jr. (D)
OtherUndecided
Public Policy Polling February 9–13, 2011500±4.4%55%32%14%
Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Bob
Corker (R)
Bart
Gordon (D)
OtherUndecided
Public Policy Polling February 9–13, 2011500±4.4%52%29%19%
Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Bob
Corker (R)
Al
Gore (D)
OtherUndecided
Public Policy Polling February 9–13, 2011500±4.4%53%38%9%
Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Bob
Corker (R)
Tim
McGraw (D)
OtherUndecided
Public Policy Polling February 9–13, 2011500±4.4%50%28%22%

Results

Despite the TN Democratic Party encouraging write-in voting, the general election only saw 0.05% cast write-in votes. Clayton significantly underperformed compared to Barack Obama, running for re-election to the Presidency on the same day. He got about 9% and 254,827 votes fewer than the President.

United States Senate election in Tennessee, 2012 [15]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Bob Corker (incumbent) 1,506,443 64.89% +14.18%
Democratic Mark Clayton705,88230.41%-17.59%
Green Martin Pleasant38,4721.66%+1.52%
Independent Shaun Crowell20,9360.90%N/A
Constitution Kermit Steck18,6200.80%N/A
Independent James Higdon8,0850.35%N/A
Independent Michael Joseph Long8,0800.35%N/A
Independent Troy Stephen Scoggin7,1480.31%N/A
Independent David Gatchell6,5230.28%N/A
n/a Write-ins1,2880.05%N/A
Total votes'2,321,477''100.0%'N/A
Republican hold

See also

Related Research Articles

2006 United States Senate elections Part of the U.S. elections held November 7, 2006

The 2006 United States Senate elections were held on November 7, 2006, with all 33 Class 1 Senate seats being contested. The term of office for those elected in 2006 ran from January 3, 2007, to January 3, 2013. Prior to the election, the Republican Party controlled 55 of the 100 Senate seats.

2008 United States Senate elections Part of the U.S. elections held November 4, 2008

The 2008 United States Senate elections were held on November 4, 2008, with 35 of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested. Thirty-three seats were up for regular elections; the winners were eligible to serve six-year terms from January 3, 2009 to January 3, 2015, as members of Class 2. There were also two special elections, the winners of those seats would finish the terms that ended January 3, 2013.

2006 United States Senate election in Tennessee

The 2006 United States Senate election in Tennessee was held November 7, 2006. Incumbent Republican Senator Bill Frist, the Majority Leader, retired after two terms in office. The open seat was won by Republican nominee Bob Corker, who defeated Democratic nominee Harold Ford Jr.. The race between Ford and Corker was one of the most competitive Senate races of 2006, with Corker winning the race by less than three percent of the vote. Corker was the only non-incumbent Republican to win a U.S. Senate seat in 2006. Since 1994, the Republican Party has held both of Tennessee's U.S. Senate seats.

Bob Corker American businessman and politician

Robert Phillips Corker Jr. is an American businessman and politician who served as a United States Senator from Tennessee from 2007 to 2019. A member of the Republican Party, he served as Chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee from 2015 to 2019.

2012 United States Senate elections Part of the U.S. elections held November 6, 2012

The 2012 United States Senate elections were held on November 6, 2012, with 33 of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested in regular elections whose winners would serve six-year terms beginning January 3, 2013, with the 113th Congress. Democrats had 21 seats up for election, plus 1 Independent and 1 Independent Democrat, while the Republicans had only 10 seats up for election.

2008 United States Senate election in Tennessee

The 2008 United States Senate election in Tennessee was held on November 4, 2008 to elect a member of the U.S. Senate from the State of Tennessee. Incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander won reelection to a second term.

2010 United States House of Representatives elections in Florida 2010 House elections in Florida

The 2010 United States House of Representatives Elections in Florida were held on November 2, 2010 to determine who would represent the state of Florida in the United States House of Representatives. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected served in the 112th Congress from January 2011 until January 2013. Florida had twenty-five seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census, but would soon gain two more congressional seats in 2012.

2014 United States Senate elections Part of the elections held in the United States on November 4, 2014

The 2014 United States Senate elections were held on November 4, 2014. A total of 36 seats in the 100-member U.S. Senate were contested. Thirty-three Class 2 seats were contested for regular six-year terms to be served from January 3, 2015 to January 3, 2021, and three Class 3 seats were contested in special elections due to Senate vacancies. The elections marked 100 years of direct elections of U.S. Senators. Going into the elections, 21 of the contested seats were held by the Democratic Party, while 15 were held by the Republican Party.

1994 United States Senate election in Tennessee

The 1994 United States Senate election in Tennessee was held November 8, 1994. Incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Jim Sasser ran for re-election to a fourth term but was defeated by Republican nominee Bill Frist.

2014 United States Senate election in Tennessee

The 2014 United States Senate election in Tennessee took place on November 4, 2014, to elect a member of the United States Senate from the State of Tennessee. Incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander defeated Democrat Gordon Ball and was re-elected to a third term in office with 61.9% of the vote against 31.9%. Lamar Alexander narrowly kept Shelby County in his column, home to Memphis. Shelby County has not voted Republican on a presidential level since 1988.

2014 Tennessee gubernatorial election

The 2014 Tennessee gubernatorial election took place on November 4, 2014 to elect the Governor of Tennessee. Incumbent Republican Governor Bill Haslam won reelection to a second term with over 70% of the vote.

2018 United States Senate elections Part of the U.S. elections held November 6, 2018

The 2018 United States Senate elections were held on November 6, 2018. 33 of the 100 seats were contested in regular elections while two others were contested in special elections due to Senate vacancies in Minnesota and Mississippi. The winners were elected to six-year terms running from January 3, 2019, to January 3, 2025. Senate Democrats had 26 seats up for election while Senate Republicans had nine seats up for election.

2016 United States Senate election in Alaska

The 2016 United States Senate election in Alaska was held on November 8, 2016, to elect a member of the United States Senate to represent the State of Alaska, concurrently with the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the United States Senate in other states and elections to the United States House of Representatives and various state and local elections.

2014 Connecticut elections

A general election was held in the U.S. state of Connecticut on November 4, 2014. All of Connecticut's executive officers were up for election as well as all of Connecticut's five seats in the United States House of Representatives. Primary elections were held on August 26, 2014.

2020 United States Senate elections Part of the U.S. elections held on November 3, 2020

The 2020 United States Senate elections were held on November 3, 2020, with the 33 class 2 seats of the Senate contested in regular elections. Of these, 21 were held by Republicans and 12 by Democrats. The winners were elected to six-year terms from January 3, 2021, to January 3, 2027. Two special elections for seats held by Republicans were also held in conjunction with the general elections, with one in Arizona to fill the vacancy created by John McCain's death in 2018 and one in Georgia following Johnny Isakson's resignation in 2019. In both races, the incumbent Republican lost to a Democrat. These elections ran concurrent with the 2020 United States presidential election in which incumbent Republican president Donald Trump lost to Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Indiana

The 2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Indiana were held on November 8, 2016, to elect the nine U.S. Representatives from the state of Indiana, one from each of the state's nine congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The primaries were held on May 3.

Rocky De La Fuente American businessman and politician

Roque "Rocky" De La Fuente Guerra is an American businessman and politician.

2018 United States Senate election in Tennessee

The 2018 United States Senate election in Tennessee took place on November 6, 2018, concurrently with other elections to the United States Senate, elections to the United States House of Representatives and various state and local elections. Incumbent Republican Senator Bob Corker opted to retire instead of running for a third term. Republican U.S. Representative Marsha Blackburn won the open seat, defeating former Democratic Governor Phil Bredesen.

The 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Tennessee were held on November 6, 2018, to elect the nine U.S. Representatives from the state of Tennessee, one from each of the state's nine congressional districts. The elections coincided with the elections of other federal and state offices, including the gubernatorial election.

2020 United States presidential election in Tennessee Election in Tennessee

The 2020 United States presidential election in Tennessee was held on Tuesday, November 3, 2020, as part of the 2020 United States presidential election in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia participated. Tennessee voters chose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote, pitting the Republican Party's nominee, incumbent President Donald Trump, and running mate Vice President Mike Pence against Democratic Party nominee, former Vice President Joe Biden, and his running mate California Senator Kamala Harris. Tennessee has 11 electoral votes in the Electoral College.

References

  1. "2012's worst candidate? With Mark Clayton, Tennessee Democrats hit bottom." by David A. Fahrenthold, Washington Post, October 22, 2012, Retrieved 2012-10-23, ""If there are people who don't believe that there's a campaign here, then guess what? They can come to Tennessee, if they're a voter, and they can see Mark E. Clayton, and next to Mark E. Clayton there's going to be a 'D,' " he said on the phone. "Like it or not, Mark Clayton is the Democratic nominee in Tennessee.""
  2. Murphy, Tim (August 3, 2012). "Dems Nominate Anti-Gay Conspiracy Theorist for Senate". Mother Jones. Retrieved August 21, 2012.
  3. Cass, Michael (August 3, 2012). "Tennessee Democratic Party disavows Senate nominee". The Tennessean . Retrieved August 4, 2012.
  4. Sisk, Chas (August 17, 2012). "Mark Clayton victory in Democratic primary upheld by Nashville judge". The Tennessean. Retrieved August 21, 2012.
  5. 1 2 "Tennessee Secretary of State Unofficial Election Results". Secretary of State of Tennessee. Retrieved August 2, 2012.
  6. Mark Clayton website
  7. "Candidates GPTN".
  8. 1 2 Winger, Richard (February 3, 2012). "Tennessee Ballot Access Law for New and Minor Parties Struck Down". Ballot Access News . Retrieved August 4, 2012.
  9. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on October 21, 2012. Retrieved August 4, 2012.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  10. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on June 6, 2013. Retrieved September 27, 2012.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  11. "2012 Senate Race Ratings for November 1, 2012". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved September 20, 2018.
  12. "2012 Senate". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved September 20, 2018.
  13. "2012 Senate Ratings". Senate Ratings. The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved September 20, 2018.
  14. "2012 Elections Map - Battle for the Senate 2012". Real Clear Politics. Retrieved September 20, 2018.
  15. http://sharetngov.tnsosfiles.com.s3.amazonaws.com/sos/election/results/2012-11/USSenateCountyTotals.pdf
Official campaign websites