Timeline of art

Last updated

This page indexes the individual year in art pages; see also art periods. This list is exclusively for the visual arts; for music, see Timeline of musical events.

Contents

Prehistoric1000s1010s1020s1030s1040s1050s1060s1070s1080s1090s1100s1110s1120s1130s1140s1150s1160s1170s1180s1190s1200s1210s1220s1230s1240s1250s1260s1270s1280s1290s1300s1310s1320s1330s1340s1350s1360s1370s1380s1390s1400s1410s1420s1430s1440s1450s1460s1470s1480s1490s1500s1510s1520s1530s1540s1550s1560s1570s1580s1590s1600s1610s1620s1630s1640s1650s1660s1670s1680s1690s1700s1710s1720s1730s1740s1750s1760s1770s1780s1790s1800s1810s1820s1830s1840s1850s1860s1870s1880s1890s1900s1910s1920s1930s1940s1950s1960s1970s1980s1990s2000s2010s2020s

2020s

2010s

2000s

1990s

1980s

1970s

1960s

1950s

1940s

1930s

1920s

1910s

1900s

1890s

1880s

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1800s

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1600s

1590s

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1530s

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1500s

1490s

1480s

1470s

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1400s

1390s

1380s

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1330s

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1310s

1300s

1290s

1280s

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1230s

1220s

1210s

1200s

1190s

1180s

1170s

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1120s

1110s

1100s

1090s

1080s

1070s

1060s

1050s

1040s

1030s

1020s

1010s

1000s

Pre 1000

10th Century AD

9th Century AD

8th Century AD

7th Century AD

6th Century AD

5th Century AD

4th Century AD

3rd Century AD

2nd Century AD

1st Century AD

1st Century BC

2nd Century BC

3rd Century BC

5th Century BC

6th Century BC

7th Century BC

8th Century BC

9th Century BC

10th Century BC

2nd Millennium BC in art

3rd Millennium BC in art

Neolithic

Mesolithic

Upper Paleolithic

Middle Paleolithic

Lower Paleolithic

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">History of painting</span> Historical development of painting

The history of painting reaches back in time to artifacts and artwork created by pre-historic artists, and spans all cultures. It represents a continuous, though periodically disrupted, tradition from Antiquity. Across cultures, continents, and millennia, the history of painting consists of an ongoing river of creativity that continues into the 21st century. Until the early 20th century it relied primarily on representational, religious and classical motifs, after which time more purely abstract and conceptual approaches gained favor.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Oil painting</span> Process of painting with pigments that are bound with a medium of drying oil

Oil painting is a painting method involving the procedure of painting with pigments with a medium of drying oil as the binder. It has been the most common technique for artistic painting on canvas, wood panel or copper for several centuries, spreading from Europe to the rest of the world. The advantages of oil for painting images include "greater flexibility, richer and denser colour, the use of layers, and a wider range from light to dark". But the process is slower, especially when one layer of paint needs to be allowed to dry before another is applied.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Jan van Eyck</span> Flemish painter (died 1441)

Jan van Eyck was a Flemish painter active in Bruges who was one of the early innovators of what became known as Early Netherlandish painting, and one of the most significant representatives of Early Northern Renaissance art. According to Vasari and other art historians including Ernst Gombrich, he invented oil painting, though most now regard that claim as an oversimplification.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Renaissance art</span> Visual arts produced during the European Renaissance

Renaissance art is the painting, sculpture, and decorative arts of the period of European history known as the Renaissance, which emerged as a distinct style in Italy in about AD 1400, in parallel with developments which occurred in philosophy, literature, music, science, and technology. Renaissance art took as its foundation the art of Classical antiquity, perceived as the noblest of ancient traditions, but transformed that tradition by absorbing recent developments in the art of Northern Europe and by applying contemporary scientific knowledge. Along with Renaissance humanist philosophy, it spread throughout Europe, affecting both artists and their patrons with the development of new techniques and new artistic sensibilities. For art historians, Renaissance art marks the transition of Europe from the medieval period to the Early Modern age.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Art of Europe</span> History of European works of art

The art of Europe, also known as Western art, encompasses the history of visual art in Europe. European prehistoric art started as mobile Upper Paleolithic rock and cave painting and petroglyph art and was characteristic of the period between the Paleolithic and the Iron Age. Written histories of European art often begin with the Aegean civilizations, dating from the 3rd millennium BC. However a consistent pattern of artistic development within Europe becomes clear only with Ancient Greek art, which was adopted and transformed by Rome and carried; with the Roman Empire, across much of Europe, North Africa and Western Asia.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Old Master</span> Any skilled painter who worked in Europe before 1800

In art history, "Old Master" refers to any painter of skill who worked in Europe before about 1800, or a painting by such an artist. An "old master print" is an original print made by an artist in the same period. The term "old master drawing" is used in the same way.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Grisaille</span> Painting technique

Grisaille is a painting executed entirely in shades of grey or of another neutral greyish colour. It is particularly used in large decorative schemes in imitation of sculpture. Many grisailles include a slightly wider colour range.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum</span> Art museum in Madrid, Spain

The Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum, or simply the Thyssen, is an art museum in Madrid, Spain, located near the Prado Museum on one of the city's main boulevards. It is known as part of the "Golden Triangle of Art", which also includes the Prado and the Reina Sofía national galleries. The Thyssen-Bornemisza fills the historical gaps in its counterparts' collections: in the Prado's case this includes Italian primitives and works from the English, Dutch and German schools, while in the case of the Reina Sofía it concerns Impressionists, Expressionists, and European and American paintings from the 20th century.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Royal Museum of Fine Arts Antwerp</span> Art museum in Antwerp, Belgium

The Royal Museum of Fine Arts Antwerp is a museum in Antwerp, Belgium, founded in 1810, that houses a collection of paintings, sculptures and drawings from the fourteenth to the twentieth centuries. This collection is representative of the artistic production and the taste of art enthusiasts in Antwerp, Belgium and the Northern and Southern Netherlands since the 15th century.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Musée Fabre</span> Museum in Montpellier, France

The Musée Fabre is a museum in the southern French city of Montpellier, capital of the Hérault département.

Events from the year 1750 in art.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Western painting</span> Art produced in the Western world

The history of Western painting represents a continuous, though disrupted, tradition from antiquity until the present time. Until the mid-19th century it was primarily concerned with representational and Classical modes of production, after which time more modern, abstract and conceptual forms gained favor.

The decade of the 1470s in art involved some significant events.

The decade of the 1410s in art involved some significant events.

The decade of the 1430s in art involved some significant events.

100 Great Paintings is a British television series broadcast in 1980 on BBC Two, devised by Edwin Mullins. He chose 20 thematic groups, such as war, the Adoration, the language of colour, the hunt, and bathing, picking five paintings from each. The selection ranges from 12th-century China through the 1950s, with an emphasis on European paintings. He deliberately avoided especially famous paintings, such as Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa or John Constable's The Haywain. The series is available on VHS and DVD.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Collection of the National Gallery, London</span>

The National Gallery is the primary British national public art gallery, sited on Trafalgar Square, in central London. It is home to one of the world's greatest collections of Western European paintings. Founded in 1824, from an initial purchase of 36 paintings by the British Government, its collections have since grown to about 2,300 paintings by roughly 750 artists dating from the mid-13th century to 1900, most of which are on display. This page lists some of the highlights of the collection.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Turin–Milan Hours</span> Manuscript

The Turin–Milan Hours is a partially destroyed illuminated manuscript, which despite its name is not strictly a book of hours. It is of exceptional quality and importance, with a very complicated history both during and after its production. It contains several miniatures of about 1420 attributed to an artist known as "Hand G" who was probably either Jan van Eyck, his brother Hubert van Eyck, or an artist very closely associated with them. About a decade or so later Barthélemy d'Eyck may have worked on some miniatures. Of the several portions of the book, that kept in Turin was destroyed in a fire in 1904, though black-and-white photographs exist.