Watertown, Connecticut

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Watertown, Connecticut
WatertownCTseal.jpg
Seal
Waterton CT lg.PNG
Location in Litchfield County, Connecticut
Coordinates: 41°37′N73°7′W / 41.617°N 73.117°W / 41.617; -73.117 Coordinates: 41°37′N73°7′W / 41.617°N 73.117°W / 41.617; -73.117
Country United States
State Connecticut
NECTA Waterbury
Region Central Naugatuck Valley
Incorporated1780
Government
  Type Council-manager
  Town managerRobert Scannell
  Town councilRaymond F. Primini, Chm.(R)
Mary Ann Rosa, Vice Chm. (R)
Gary L. Bernier
David J. Demirs (D)
Richard DiFederico (R)
Ed Lopes (R)
Joe Polletta (R)
Lou Razza (D)
K. Duplisse (R)
  Board of Education CommissionersLeslie Crotty, Chm. (R)
Tom Lambert, Vice Chm. (R)
Janelle Wilk, Sec. (R)
Robert Makowski (R)
Victor Vicenzi, Jr. (R)
Cathie Rinaldi (R)
Josephine Cavallo-Rosa (D)
James C. Gambardella (D)
Cheryl Albino (D)
Area
  Total29.6 sq mi (76.7 km2)
  Land29.2 sq mi (75.5 km2)
  Water0.4 sq mi (1.1 km2)
Elevation
620 ft (189 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total22,514
  Density765/sq mi (298.2/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (Eastern)
ZIP code
06779, 06795
Area code(s) 860
FIPS code 09-80490
GNIS feature ID0213527
Website www.watertownct.org

Watertown is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 22,514 at the 2010 census. The zip code for Watertown is 06795. It is a suburb of Waterbury. It borders the towns of Woodbury, Middlebury, Morris, Plymouth, Bethlehem, and Thomaston. The urban center of the town is the Watertown census-designated place, with a population of 3,574 at the 2010 census. [1]

New England town Basic unit of local government in each of the six New England federated states of the United States

The New England town, generally referred to simply as a town in New England, is the basic unit of local government and local division of state authority in each of the six New England states and without a direct counterpart in most other U.S. states. New England towns overlay the entire area of a state, similar to civil townships in other states where they exist, but they are fully functioning municipal corporations, possessing powers similar to cities in other states. New Jersey's system of equally powerful townships, boroughs, towns, and cities is the system which is most similar to that of New England. New England towns are often governed by a town meeting legislative body. The great majority of municipal corporations in New England are based on the town model; statutory forms based on the concept of a compact populated place are uncommon, though they are prevalent elsewhere in the U.S. County government in New England states is typically weak at best, and in some states nonexistent. Connecticut, for example, has no county governments, nor does Rhode Island. Both of those states retain counties only as geographic subdivisions with no governmental authority, while Massachusetts has abolished eight of fourteen county governments so far. With few exceptions, counties serve mostly as dividing lines for the states' judicial systems.

Litchfield County, Connecticut County in the United States

Litchfield County is located in northwestern Connecticut in the New York metropolitan area. As of the 2010 census, the population was 189,927. The county was named after Lichfield, in England. Litchfield County has the lowest population density of any county in Connecticut and is geographically the state's largest county.

Connecticut state of the United States of America

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the United States. As of the 2010 Census, it has the highest per-capita income, Human Development Index (0.962), and median household income in the United States. It is bordered by Rhode Island to the east, Massachusetts to the north, New York to the west, and Long Island Sound to the south. Its capital is Hartford and its most populous city is Bridgeport. It is part of New England, although portions of it are often grouped with New York and New Jersey as the Tri-state area. The state is named for the Connecticut River which approximately bisects the state. The word "Connecticut" is derived from various anglicized spellings of an Algonquian word for "long tidal river".

Contents

Founding

Around 1657 began the colonization of the area today called Watertown. In that time, the colony was called Mattatock, though it had several variations in spelling through the years. [2] The land where Watertown is now located, having originally belonged to Mattatock, officially changed its name to Watterbury (now Waterbury) by record on March 20, 1695, by consensus of a council. Essentially, the original Colony of Mattatuck, which became Watterbury, then Waterbury in name, comprised a much greater land area than Waterbury does today. The original name for Watertown was Waterbury. [3] Thomas Judd and other families were among the first investors to buy the land as a group. The Town of Watertown was officially incorporated in 1780 under a charter within the United States of America. [4]

Geography

It is in the Eastern Standard time zone. The elevation is 620 feet.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 29.6 square miles (76.6 km²), of which, 29.1 square miles (75.5 km²) of it is land and 0.4 square miles (1.1 km²) of it (1.45%) is water. Watertown also includes the section known as Oakville, which is often mistaken for a separate town. Although Oakville has its own post office and ZIP code, it does not have a charter or town government of its own. Oakville also receives all of its city services (Police, fire, water and so on) from Watertown.

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Oakville is a census-designated place and neighborhood section of Watertown, Litchfield County in Connecticut, United States. The population was 9,047 as of the 2010 census. The zip code for Oakville is 06779.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1820 1,439
1850 1,533
1860 1,5873.5%
1870 1,6987.0%
1880 1,89711.7%
1890 2,32322.5%
1900 3,10033.4%
1910 3,85024.2%
1920 6,05057.1%
1930 8,19235.4%
1940 8,7877.3%
1950 10,69921.8%
1960 14,83738.7%
1970 18,61025.4%
1980 19,4894.7%
1990 20,4565.0%
2000 21,6615.9%
2010 22,5143.9%
Est. 201422,046 [5] −2.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]

As of the census [7] of 2000, there were 21,661 people, 8,046 households, and 5,994 families residing in the town. The population density was 743.0 people per square mile (286.9/km²). There were 8,298 housing units at an average density of 284.6 per square mile (109.9/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 96.46% White, 0.75% African American, 0.12% Native American, 1.27% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.48% from other races, and 0.87% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.87% of the population.

Census Acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population

A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. This term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agriculture, business, and traffic censuses. The United Nations defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years. United Nations recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practice.

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

There were 8,046 households out of which 34.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.7% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.5% were non-families. 21.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.13.

Marriage Social union or legal contract between people called spouses that creates kinship

Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock, is a culturally recognised union between people, called spouses, that establishes rights and obligations between them, as well as between them and their children, and between them and their in-laws. The definition of marriage varies around the world not only between cultures and between religions, but also throughout the history of any given culture and religion, evolving to both expand and constrict in who and what is encompassed, but typically it is principally an institution in which interpersonal relationships, usually sexual, are acknowledged or sanctioned. In some cultures, marriage is recommended or considered to be compulsory before pursuing any sexual activity. When defined broadly, marriage is considered a cultural universal. A marriage ceremony is known as a wedding.

In the town, the population was spread out with 24.8% under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 29.9% from 25 to 44, 24.9% from 45 to 64, and 14.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.6 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $59,420, and the median income for a family was $68,761. Males had a median income of $47,097 versus $31,822 for females. The per capita income for the town was $26,044. About 1.1% of families and 2.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.8% of those under age 18 and 3.7% of those age 65 or over.

Per capita income mean income of the people in an economic unit such as a country or city

Per capita income (PCI) or average income measures the average income earned per person in a given area in a specified year. It is calculated by dividing the area's total income by its total population.

Transportation

The Route 8 expressway runs through the eastern edge of town, with two exits inside the town. The main routes through the town center are Route 6 running east-west and Route 63 running north-south. Other important highways include Route 73 (a more direct route to Waterbury), and Route 262. Public transportation is provided by buses of Northeast Transportation Company.

Local media

Notable places

"The 1812 Oak" in Watertown The 1812 Oak, Watertown, CT - August 4, 2011.jpg
"The 1812 Oak" in Watertown

Notable people

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. https://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-2-8.pdf
  2. "WATERBURY, CONNECTICUT". JosFamilyHistory.com. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  3. "Full text of "The History of Waterbury, Connecticut: The Original Township Embracing Present Watertown and ..."". archive.org. p. 137. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  4. "Watertown, CT - Brief History of Watertown CT". www.WatertownCT.org. Retrieved August 17, 2017.
  5. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014" . Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  6. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  7. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  8. "Macaroni Kid". Southbury.MacaroniKid.com. Retrieved August 17, 2017.