Secretary of State for Transport

Last updated

Secretary of State for Transport
Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (HM Government).svg
Official portrait of Rt Hon Grant Shapps MP.jpg
Incumbent
Grant Shapps

since 24 July 2019
Department for Transport
Style Transport Secretary
(informal)
The Right Honourable
(within the UK and the Commonwealth)
AppointerThe Monarch
on advice of the Prime Minister
Formation19 May 1919
First holder Eric Campbell Geddes
Website www.dft.gov.uk
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This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
the United Kingdom
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Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Transport is the member of the cabinet responsible for the British Department for Transport. The office used to be called the Minister of Transport and has been merged with the Department for the Environment at various times.

Contents

The Secretary of State is supported by a small team of junior Ministers. Each Minister is a Member of Parliament from either the House of Commons or the House of Lords. The number of Ministers supporting the Secretary of State for Transport vary from time to time, but is usually about 3. The titles given to these Ministers also vary. Currently the positions are held by one Minister of State for Transport and two Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State for Transport.

During the tenure of different governments the title of Minister of/for Transport has been used to refer to the Secretary of State for Transport, one or more of the junior Ministers or even both the Secretary of State and the junior Ministers at the same time.

From 2003 until June 2007 the role of Secretary of State for Transport was combined with the role of Secretary of State for Scotland. This arrangement changed on 28 June 2007, when in the appointment of his first Cabinet, Prime Minister Gordon Brown assigned the responsibilities of Secretary of State for Scotland to Des Browne, his Secretary of State for Defence.

The names provided in the sections below are those who have served in a position equivalent to the Secretary of State for Transport.

Minister of Transport (1919–1941)

Colour key (for political parties):
   Conservative    Labour    National Labour    Liberal    National Liberal

NameTerm of officePolitical partyPrime Minister
Eric Campbell Geddes 19 May 19197 November 1921 Conservative David Lloyd George
(Coalition)
The Viscount Peel 7 November 192112 April 1922Conservative
The Earl of Crawford 12 April 192231 October 1922Conservative
Sir John Baird, Bt 31 October 192222 January 1924Conservative Bonar Law
Stanley Baldwin
Harry Gosling 24 January 19243 November 1924 Labour Ramsay MacDonald
Wilfrid Ashley 11 November 19244 June 1929 Conservative Stanley Baldwin
Herbert Morrison 7 June 192924 August 1931 Labour Ramsay MacDonald
John Pybus 3 September 193122 February 1933 Liberal Ramsay MacDonald
(1st & 2nd National min.)
Hon. Oliver Stanley 22 February 193329 June 1934 Conservative
Leslie Hore-Belisha 29 June 193428 May 1937 National Liberal
Stanley Baldwin
(3rd National min.)
Leslie Burgin 28 May 193721 April 1939National Liberal Neville Chamberlain
(4th National min.)
Euan Wallace 21 April 193914 May 1940 Conservative Neville Chamberlain
(War Coalition)
John Reith 14 May 19403 October 1940 National Independent Winston Churchill
(War Coalition)
John Moore-Brabazon 3 October 19401 May 1941 Conservative

Minister of (War) Transport and Minister of Civil Aviation (1941–1953)

The Ministry of Transport absorbed the Ministry of Shipping and was renamed the Ministry of War Transport in 1941, but resumed its previous name at the end of the war.

The Ministry of Civil Aviation was created by Winston Churchill in 1944 to look at peaceful ways of using aircraft and to find something for the aircraft factories to do after the war. The new Conservative government in 1951 appointed the same minister to both Transport and Civil Aviation, finally amalgamating the ministries on 1 October 1953.

Colour key (for political parties):
   Conservative    Labour    National Liberal

Minister of
Transport
Minister of
Civil Aviation
Term of officePolitical partyPrime Minister
The Lord Leathers
(Min. of War Transport)
1 May 19418 October 1944 Conservative Winston Churchill
(War Coalition)
The Viscount Swinton 8 October 194426 July 1945Conservative
Alfred Barnes The Lord Winster 3-4 August 19454 October 1946 Labour Clement Attlee
The Lord Nathan 4 October 194631 May 1948Labour
The Lord Pakenham 31 May 19481 June 1951Labour
The Lord Ogmore 1 June 195126 October 1951Labour
Hon. John Maclay 31 October 19517 May 1952 National Liberal Sir Winston Churchill
Alan Lennox-Boyd 7 May 19521 October 1953 Conservative

Minister of Transport and Civil Aviation (1953–1959)

Colour key (for political parties):
   Conservative

NameTerm of officePolitical partyPrime Minister
Alan Lennox-Boyd 1 October 195328 July 1954 Conservative Sir Winston Churchill
John Boyd-Carpenter 28 July 195420 December 1955Conservative
Harold Watkinson 20 December 195514 October 1959Conservative Sir Anthony Eden
Harold Macmillan

Minister of Transport (1959–1970)

The Ministry was renamed back to the Ministry of Transport on 14 October 1959, when a separate Ministry of Aviation was formed.

Colour key (for political parties):
   Conservative    Labour

NameTerm of officePolitical partyPrime Minister
Ernest Marples 14 October 195916 October 1964 Conservative Harold Macmillan
Sir Alec Douglas-Home
Thomas Fraser 16 October 196423 December 1965 Labour Harold Wilson
Barbara Castle 23 December 19656 April 1968Labour
Richard Marsh 6 April 19686 October 1969Labour
Fred Mulley 6 October 196919 June 1970Labour
John Peyton 23 June 197015 October 1970 Conservative Edward Heath

Minister within the Department of the Environment (1970–1976)

Transport responsibilities were subsumed by the Department for the Environment, headed by the Secretary of State for the Environment from 15 October 1970 to 10 September 1976.

Colour key (for political parties):
   Conservative    Labour

NameTerm of officePolitical partyPrime Minister
Peter Walker 15 October 19705 November 1972 Conservative Edward Heath
Geoffrey Rippon 5 November 19724 March 1974Conservative
Anthony Crosland 5 March 19748 April 1976 Labour Harold Wilson

The junior ministers responsible for transport within the Department for the Environment:

Minister for Transport Industries (1970–1974)

Minister for Transport (1974–1976)

The Department for Transport was recreated as a separate department by James Callaghan in 1976.

Secretary of State for Transport (1976–1979)

Colour key (for political parties):
   Labour

NameTerm of officePolitical partyPrime Minister
Bill Rodgers 10 September 19764 May 1979 Labour James Callaghan

Minister of Transport (1979–1981)

Not an official member of the cabinet. Colour key (for political parties):
   Conservative

NameTerm of officePolitical partyPrime Minister
Norman Fowler 11 May 19795 January 1981 Conservative Margaret Thatcher

Secretary of State for Transport (1981–1997)

Colour key (for political parties):
   Conservative

NameTerm of officePolitical partyPrime Minister
Norman Fowler 5 January 198114 September 1981 Conservative Margaret Thatcher
David Howell 14 September 198111 June 1983Conservative
Tom King 11 June 198316 October 1983Conservative
Hon. Nicholas Ridley 16 October 198321 May 1986Conservative
John Moore 21 May 198613 June 1987Conservative
Paul Channon 13 June 198724 July 1989Conservative
Cecil Parkinson 24 July 198928 November 1990Conservative
Malcolm Rifkind 28 November 199010 April 1992Conservative John Major
John MacGregor 10 April 199220 July 1994Conservative
Brian Mawhinney 20 July 19945 July 1995Conservative
Sir George Young, Bt 5 July 19952 May 1997Conservative

Secretary of State for Environment, Transport and the Regions (1997–2001)

The super-department Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions was created in 1997 for Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott. Colour key (for political parties):
   Labour

NamePortraitTerm of officePolitical partyPrime Minister
John Prescott John Prescott on his last day as Deputy Prime Minister, June 2007.jpg 2 May 19978 June 2001 Labour Tony Blair

From 1997 to 2001, the Ministers of State with responsibility for Transport were:

John Reid attended cabinet meetings, but was not formally a member of the cabinet whereas Gavin Strang was given a seat in the cabinet when he held the position.

Secretary of State for Transport, Local Government and the Regions (2001–2002)

The Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions was widely considered unwieldy and so was broken up, with the Transport functions now combined with Local Government and the Regions in the DTLR (Department for Transport, Local Government and the Regions). Critics argued from the outset that this was a mistake and that a post of Secretary of State for Transport was needed in its own right.

Colour key (for political parties):
   Labour

NameTerm of officePolitical partyPrime Minister
Stephen Byers 8 June 200129 May 2002 Labour Tony Blair

After Byers' resignation, such a division was made, with the portfolios of Local Government and the Regions transferred to the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister.

During the lifetime of DTLGR, John Spellar served as Minister of State for Transport with a right to attend Cabinet.

Secretary of State for Transport (2002– )

Colour key (for political parties):
   Conservative    Labour

NamePortraitTerm of officePolitical partyPrime Minister
Alistair Darling AlistairDarlingABr cropped.jpg 29 May 20025 May 2006 Labour Tony Blair
Douglas Alexander Douglas Alexander at the India Economic Summit 2008.jpg 5 May 200627 June 2007Labour
Ruth Kelly RuthKellyMP.jpg 28 June 20073 October 2008Labour Gordon Brown
Geoff Hoon Geoff Hoon Headshot.jpg 3 October 20085 June 2009Labour
The Lord Adonis Lord Adonis.jpg 5 June 200911 May 2010Labour
Philip Hammond Official portrait of Mr Philip Hammond crop 2.jpg 12 May 2010 [1] 14 October 2011 Conservative David Cameron
(Coalition)
Justine Greening Official portrait of Justine Greening crop 2.jpg 14 October 20114 September 2012Conservative
Patrick McLoughlin Official portrait of Sir Patrick McLoughlin crop 2.jpg 4 September 201214 July 2016Conservative
David Cameron
(II)
Chris Grayling Official portrait of Chris Grayling crop 2.jpg 14 July 201624 July 2019Conservative Theresa May
Grant Shapps Official portrait of Grant Shapps crop 2.jpg 24 July 2019IncumbentConservative Boris Johnson

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References

  1. "Out with the old cabinet, in with the new". Public Service. Archived from the original on 22 July 2011. Retrieved 12 May 2010.