Thomaston, Connecticut

Last updated
Thomaston, Connecticut
THOMASTON,LITCHFIELD,CONNECTICUT.jpg
Autumn 2003 view of Thomaston from Plymouth
ThomastonCTseal.jpg
Seal
Motto(s): 
"A Town For All Time..." [1]
Thomaston CT lg.PNG
Location in Litchfield County, Connecticut
Coordinates: 41°40′15″N73°04′57″W / 41.67083°N 73.08250°W / 41.67083; -73.08250 Coordinates: 41°40′15″N73°04′57″W / 41.67083°N 73.08250°W / 41.67083; -73.08250
Country United States
State Connecticut
NECTA Hartford
Region Central Naugatuck Valley
Incorporated1875
Government
  Type Selectman-town meeting
  First selectmanEdmond V. Mone (R) [2] [3]
  SelectmanKristin Mosimann (D)
  SelectmanBruce Barrett, Sr. (D)
Area
  Total12.2 sq mi (31.6 km2)
  Land12.0 sq mi (31.0 km2)
  Water0.2 sq mi (0.6 km2)
Elevation
446 ft (136 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total7,887
  Density659/sq mi (254.4/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (Eastern)
ZIP codes
06778, 06787
Area code(s) 860
FIPS code 09-75730
GNIS feature ID0213515
Website www.thomastonct.org

Thomaston is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 7,887 at the 2010 census, [4] up from 7,503 at the 2000 census. The urban center of the town is the Thomaston census-designated place, with a population of 1,910 at the 2010 census. [5]

New England town Basic unit of local government in each of the six New England federated states of the United States

The New England town, generally referred to in New England simply as a town, is the basic unit of local government and local division of state authority in each of the six New England states and without a direct counterpart in most other U.S. states. New England towns overlay the entire area of a state, similar to civil townships in other states where they exist, but they are fully functioning municipal corporations, possessing powers similar to cities in other states. New Jersey's system of equally powerful townships, boroughs, towns, and cities is the system which is most similar to that of New England. New England towns are often governed by a town meeting legislative body. The great majority of municipal corporations in New England are based on the town model; statutory forms based on the concept of a compact populated place are uncommon, though they are prevalent elsewhere in the U.S. County government in New England states is typically weak at best, and in some states nonexistent. Connecticut, for example, has no county governments, nor does Rhode Island. Both of those states retain counties only as geographic subdivisions with no governmental authority, while Massachusetts has abolished eight of fourteen county governments so far. With few exceptions, counties serve mostly as dividing lines for the states' judicial systems.

Litchfield County, Connecticut County of Connecticut in Connecticut

Litchfield County is located in northwestern Connecticut in the New York metropolitan area. As of the 2010 census, the population was 189,927. The county was named after Lichfield, in England. Litchfield County has the lowest population density of any county in Connecticut and is geographically the state's largest county.

Connecticut U.S. state in the United States

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. As of the 2010 Census, it has the highest per-capita income, Human Development Index (0.962), and median household income in the United States. It is bordered by Rhode Island to the east, Massachusetts to the north, New York to the west, and Long Island Sound to the south. Its capital is Hartford and its most populous city is Bridgeport. It is part of New England, although portions of it are often grouped with New York and New Jersey as the tri-state area. The state is named for the Connecticut River which approximately bisects the state. The word "Connecticut" is derived from various anglicized spellings of an Algonquian word for "long tidal river".

Contents

History

The town, originally part of the town of Plymouth and referred to as "Plymouth Hollow", was first settled by Henry Cook ("the soldier in the wilderness", 1683–1750) around 1728. [6] :480 [7] The town is known for clockmaking, which started in 1803, when Eli Terry established a factory in the town. Terry brought mass production to the clockmaking industry, helping to reduce the cost of clocks. He introduced and patented the shelf clock in 1814, which reduced the cost of a clock from $25 to $5. His clocks were sold throughout the United States. [6] :480

Plymouth, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Plymouth is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. It is named after Plymouth, Devon, England. The population was 12,243 at the 2010 census, up from 11,634 at the 2000 census. The town of Plymouth includes the villages of Plymouth Center, Terryville and Pequabuck.

Eli Terry American clockmaker

Eli Terry Sr. was an inventor and clockmaker in Connecticut. He received a United States patent for a shelf clock mechanism. He introduced mass production to the art of clockmaking, which made clocks affordable for the average American citizen. Terry occupies an important place in the beginnings of the development of interchangeable parts manufacturing. Terry is considered the first person in American history to actually accomplish Interchangeable parts with no government funding. Terry became one of the most accomplished mechanics in New England during the early part of the nineteenth century. The village of Terryville, Connecticut is named for his son, Eli Terry Jr.

Mass production production of large amounts of standardized products

Mass production, also known as flow production or continuous production, is the production of large amounts of standardized products, including and especially on assembly lines. Together with job production and batch production, it is one of the three main production methods.

The town was incorporated in its own right and under the name "Thomaston" in 1875. [8] The name derives from Seth Thomas, the early clockmaker, who established a factory in town in 1812. [6] :60 [8] The Seth Thomas clock factory building still exists; however, the clockmaking industry has long since left the state as well as the country.

Seth Thomas (clockmaker) American clockmaker

Seth Thomas was an American clockmaker and a pioneer of mass production at his Seth Thomas Clock Company.

Seth Thomas Clock Company

The Seth Thomas Clock Company was founded by Seth Thomas and began producing clocks in 1813. It was incorporated as the "Seth Thomas Clock Company" in 1853. The company manufactured clock movements for the Self Winding Clock Company from 1886 thru the early 1890s, in addition to its standard offering of longcase clocks, mantel, wall, and table-top clocks.

Geography

Thomaston is in southeastern Litchfield County, bordered on the south by the city of Waterbury in New Haven County. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 12.2 square miles (31.6 km2). 12.0 square miles (31.0 km2) of it are land and 0.2 square miles (0.6 km2) of it (1.94%) are water. [4]

Waterbury, Connecticut City in Connecticut, United States

Waterbury is a city in the U.S. state of Connecticut on the Naugatuck River, 33 miles southwest of Hartford and 77 miles northeast of New York City. Waterbury is the second-largest city in New Haven County, Connecticut. As of the 2010 census, Waterbury had a population of 110,366, making it the 10th largest city in the New York Metropolitan Area, 9th largest city in New England and the 5th largest city in Connecticut.

New Haven County, Connecticut County of Connecticut in Connecticut

New Haven County is a county in the south central part of the U.S. state of Connecticut. As of the 2010 census, the population was 862,477 making it the third-most populous county in Connecticut. Two of the state's largest cities, New Haven (2nd) and Waterbury (5th), are part of New Haven County.

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

The town is located at the confluence of the Naugatuck River, Northfield Brook and Black Rock Brook, and is protected by US Army Corps of Engineers flood control dams on each of these watercourses. These were all constructed in the years immediately following the devastating flood of 1955 which ravaged the town as well as the state in general.

Naugatuck River river in the United States of America

The Naugatuck River is a 40.2-mile-long (64.7 km) river in the U.S. state of Connecticut. Its waters carve out the Naugatuck River Valley in the western reaches of the state, flowing generally due south and eventually emptying into the Housatonic River at Derby, Connecticut and thence 11 miles (18 km) to Long Island Sound. The Plume and Atwood Dam in Thomaston, completed in 1960 following the Great Flood of 1955, creates a reservoir on the river and is the last barrier to salmon and trout migrating up from the sea.

Principal communities

Adjacent towns and city

Litchfield, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Litchfield is a town in and former county seat of Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 8,466 at the 2010 census. The boroughs of Bantam and Litchfield are located within the town. There are also three unincorporated villages: East Litchfield, Milton, and Northfield. Northfield, located in the southeastern corner of Litchfield, is home to a high percentage of the Litchfield population.

Harwinton, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Harwinton is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 5,642 at the 2010 census, up from 5,283 at the 2000 census. The high school is Lewis S. Mills.

Watertown, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Watertown is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 22,514 at the 2010 census. The zip code for Watertown is 06795. It is a suburb of Waterbury. It borders the towns of Woodbury, Middlebury, Morris, Plymouth, Bethlehem, and Thomaston. The urban center of the town is the Watertown census-designated place, with a population of 3,574 at the 2010 census.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 3,225
1890 3,2781.6%
1900 3,3000.7%
1910 3,5337.1%
1920 3,99313.0%
1930 4,1884.9%
1940 4,2381.2%
1950 4,89615.5%
1960 5,85019.5%
1970 6,2336.5%
1980 6,2760.7%
1990 6,94710.7%
2000 7,5038.0%
2010 7,8875.1%
Est. 20147,683 [9] −2.6%
U.S. Decennial Census [10]

As of the census [11] of 2000, there were 7,503 people, 2,916 households, and 2,067 families residing in the town. The population density was 624.7 people per square mile (241.2/km²). There were 3,014 housing units at an average density of 251.0 per square mile (96.9/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.85% White, Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.45% of the population, 0.60% African American, 0.11% Native American, 0.49% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.41% from other races, and 0.53% from two or more races.

There were 2,916 households out of which 34.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.5% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.1% were non-families. 24.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the town, the population was spread out with 25.3% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 33.2% from 25 to 44, 23.2% from 45 to 64, and 12.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.8 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $54,297, and the median income for a family was $63,682. Males had a median income of $40,795 versus $31,744 for females. The per capita income for the town was $24,799. 4.2% of the population and 3.3% of families were below the poverty line. Of the total population, 5.8% of those under the age of 18 and 4.5% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

Transportation

The Route 8 expressway runs along the Naugatuck River in the eastern part of town and has three exits in Thomaston. Other state highways in the town are U.S. Route 6, Connecticut Route 109, Route 222, and Route 254. Thomaston is headquarters of the Naugatuck Railroad, a heritage railway and short line freight operator that operates 21 miles (34 km) of former New Haven trackage between Waterbury and Torrington. Interchange is with Pan Am Railways at Highland Junction.

Schools

The town is home to Thomaston High School, a school with roughly up to 375 students, from grade 7 to 12. It is also home to Black Rock Elementary School, hosting pre-K to 3rd grade, and Thomaston Center School, hosting the town's 4th, 5th, and 6th grade students.

Landmarks

Notable people

Related Research Articles

Bantam, Connecticut Borough in Connecticut, United States

Bantam is a borough in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 759 at the 2010 census.

Bethlehem, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Bethlehem is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 3,607 at the 2010 census, up from 3,422 at the 2000 census. The town center is a historic district and a census-designated place (CDP).

Bridgewater, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Bridgewater is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 1,727 at the 2010 census, down from 1,824 at the 2000 census.

Oakville is a census-designated place and neighborhood section of Watertown, Litchfield County in Connecticut, United States. The population was 9,047 as of the 2010 census. The zip code for Oakville is 06779.

Roxbury, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Roxbury is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 2,262 at the 2010 census.

Warren, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Warren is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 1,461 at the 2010 census. The town was named for Revolutionary War General Joseph Warren.

Winchester, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Winchester is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 11,242 at the 2010 census. The City of Winsted is located in Winchester.

Woodbury, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Woodbury is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 9,975 at the 2010 census. The town center is also designated by the U.S. Census Bureau as a census-designated place (CDP). Woodbury was founded in 1673.

Beacon Falls, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Beacon Falls is a town in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. It lies in the southwestern part of the state, and is bisected by the Naugatuck River. The population was 5,246 at the 2000 census. The population increased to 6,049 at the 2010 census.

Middlebury, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Middlebury is a town in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 7,575 at the 2010 census.

Oxford, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Oxford is a residential town located in western New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 12,683 at the 2010 Census. Oxford is the 26th-wealthiest town in the state by median household income. Distinct settled areas in the town include Oxford Center, Quaker Farms, and Riverside. Oxford belongs to the Bridgeport–Stamford–Norwalk Metropolitan Statistical Area, a subregion of the New York metropolitan area.

Wolcott, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Wolcott is a town in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. It is primarily residential with a population of 16,680 at the 2010 census. The town was settled in the 1730s by the Connecticut Colony and was known as Farmingbury, but it was renamed Wolcott after being incorporated in 1796.

Naugatuck, Connecticut Borough in Connecticut, United States

Naugatuck is a consolidated borough and town in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. The town spans both sides of the Naugatuck River just south of Waterbury, and includes the communities of Union City on the east side of the river, which has its own post office, Straitsville on the southeast, and Millville on the west. As of the 2010 census, Naugatuck had a population of 31,862.

Mattatuck State Forest

Mattatuck State Forest is a Connecticut state forest spread over twenty parcels in the towns of Waterbury, Plymouth, Thomaston, Watertown, Litchfield, and Harwinton. The Naugatuck River runs through a portion of the forest. The largest section of the forest is located about 1 mile (1.6 km) north of Waterbury. The Leatherman's Cave, named after the vagabond Leatherman of the late 19th century, is located in Thomaston on the Mattatuck Trail, just north of the junction with the Jericho Trail.

Central Naugatuck Valley Place in Connecticut, United States

The Central Naugatuck Valley is a region of Connecticut in New Haven and Litchfield counties located approximately 70 miles (110 km) northeast of New York City and 110 miles (180 km) southwest of Boston. The region comprises 13 towns: Beacon Falls, Bethlehem, Cheshire, Middlebury, Naugatuck, Oxford, Prospect, Southbury, Thomaston, Waterbury, Watertown, Wolcott, and Woodbury.

References

  1. "Town of Thomaston Connecticut". Town of Thomaston Connecticut. Retrieved September 22, 2012.
  2. "Board of Selectmen". Town of Thomaston, CT. Retrieved 16 September 2015.
  3. "Thomaston CT Municipal Election Results, 2013" (PDF). Connecticut Secretary of State. Retrieved 16 September 2015.
  4. 1 2 "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001), Thomaston town, Litchfield County, Connecticut". American FactFinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved October 15, 2019.
  5. "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001), Thomaston CDP, Connecticut". American FactFinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved October 15, 2019.
  6. 1 2 3 Federal Writers' Project. Connecticut: A Guide to Its Roads, Lore and People. US History Publishers. ISBN   978-1-60354-007-0 . Retrieved 23 September 2010.
  7. History of Litchfield County, Part 1. J.W. Lewis & Co. 1881. p. 488. Retrieved 2015-01-30.
  8. 1 2 "History". Town of Thomaston. Archived from the original on 2010-03-31. Retrieved 2010-05-07.
  9. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Archived from the original on May 23, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  10. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  11. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Thomaston, Connecticut at Wikimedia Commons