ICC Women's T20 World Cup

Last updated
ICC Women's T20 World Cup
Administrator International Cricket Council
Format WT20I
First edition 2009 Flag of England.svg  England
Latest edition 2018 WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies
Next edition 2020 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Tournament format Round robin and knockout
Number of teams10
Current championFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia (4th title)
Most successfulFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia (4 titles)
Most runs Flag of New Zealand.svg Suzie Bates (881) [1]
Most wickets Flag of Australia (converted).svg Ellyse Perry (36) [2]
Website Office Website

The ICC Women's T20 World Cup is the biennial international championship for women's Twenty20 International cricket. [3] [4] The event is organised by the sport's governing body, the International Cricket Council (ICC), with the first edition was held in England in 2009. For the first three tournaments, there were eight participants, but this number has been raised to ten from the 2014 edition onwards. At each tournament, a set number of teams qualify automatically, with the remaining teams determined by the World Twenty20 Qualifier. Australia are the most successful team, having won the tournament four times.

Women's Twenty20 International (WT20I) is the shortest form of women's international cricket. A women's Twenty20 International is a 20 overs-per-side cricket match played in a maximum of 150 minutes between two of the top 10 ranked countries of the International Cricket Council (ICC) in terms of women's cricket. The first Twenty20 International match was held in August 2004 between England and New Zealand, six months before the first Twenty20 International match was played between two men's teams. The ICC Women's World Twenty20 was first held in 2009.

International Cricket Council Governing body of cricket

The International Cricket Council (ICC) is the global governing body of cricket. It was founded as the Imperial Cricket Conference in 1909 by representatives from Australia, England and South Africa. It was renamed as the International Cricket Conference in 1965, and took up its current name in 1989. It organises world championship events such as Cricket World Cup, Women's Cricket World Cup, ICC T20 World Cup, ICC Women's T20 World Cup, ICC Champions Trophy and Under-19 Cricket World Cup.

The 2009 ICC Women's World Twenty20 competition took on a different format from that of the men's, having eight teams split into two pools followed directly by the semi-finals and final. All pool stage matches were played at the County Ground in Taunton. The women's competition was also shorter, running for 10 days as opposed to 16 for the men's tournament, however the women's semi-finals and final were held on the same days and at the same venues as those of their male counterparts.

Contents

Qualification

Qualification is determined by the ICC Women's Twenty20 international rankings and a qualification event, the Women's World Twenty20 Qualifier. Until 2014, six teams were determined by the top six teams of the ICC Women's Twenty20 International rankings at the time of the draw and the remaining two places determined by a qualification process. For the 2014 tournament, six places are determined by the top eight teams of the ICC Women's T20I rankings, with the host country and three qualifiers joining them in the finals. 2016 onwards, seven places are determined by the top eight teams of the ICC Women's T20I rankings, with the host country and two qualifiers joining them in the finals.

The ICC Women's T20 World Cup Qualifier (until 2018, the ICC Women's World Twenty20 Qualifier is an international cricket tournament that serves as the final step of the qualification process for the Women's T20 World Cup. It was held for the first time in 2013, in Dublin, Ireland, with the title shared by Pakistan and Sri Lanka after the final was interrupted by rain. Ireland also qualified by defeated the Netherlands in the third-place playoff. For the 2015 tournament in Bangkok, Thailand, the number of qualifying places was reduced from three to two, with the two finalists, Bangladesh and Ireland, proceeding to the main event.

Twenty20 International Form of cricket

A Twenty20 International (T20I) is a form of cricket, played between two of the international members of the International Cricket Council (ICC), in which each team faces twenty overs. The matches have top-class status and are the highest T20 standard. The game is played under the rules of Twenty20 cricket. Starting from the format's inception in 2005, T20I status only applied to Full Members and some Associate Member teams. However, in April 2018, the ICC announced that it would grant T20I status to all its 105 members from 1 January 2019.

Summary

YearHost nation(s)Final venueFinal
WinnersResultRunners-up
2009
Details
Flag of England.svg
England
London Flag of England.svg  England
86/4 (17 overs)
England won by 6 wickets
Scorecard
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
85 (20 overs)
2010
Details
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg
West Indies
Bridgetown Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
106/8 (20 overs)
Australia won by 3 runs
Scorecard
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
103/6 (20 overs)
2012
Details
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg
Sri Lanka
Colombo Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
142/4 (20 overs)
Australia won by 4 runs
Scorecard
Flag of England.svg  England
138/9 (20 overs)
2014
Details
Flag of Bangladesh.svg
Bangladesh
Dhaka Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
106/4 (15 overs)
Australia won by 6 wickets
Scorecard
Flag of England.svg  England
105/8 (20 overs)
2016
Details
Flag of India.svg
India
Kolkata WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies
149/2 (19 overs)
West Indies won by 8 wickets
Scorecard
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
148/5 (20 overs)
2018
Details
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg
West Indies
North Sound Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
106/2 (15.1 overs)
Australia won by 8 wickets
Scorecard
Flag of England.svg  England
105 (19.4 overs)
2020
Details
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia
Melbourne[Scorecard
2022
Details
Flag of South Africa.svg
South Africa

Performance of teams

TeamAppearancesBest performanceStatistics [5]
TotalFirstLatestPlayedWonLostTieNRWin%
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 6 2009 2018 Champions (2010, 2012, 2014, 2018)322471(1)076.56
Flag of England.svg  England 6 2009 2018 Champions (2009)292171(0)074.13
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies 6 2009 2018 Champions (2016)2717100062.96
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 6 2009 2018 Runners-up (2009, 2010)282080071.42
Flag of India.svg  India 6 2009 2018 Semi-finals (2009, 2010, 2018)2613130050.00
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 6 2009 2018 Semi-finals (2014)238150034.78
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka 6 2009 2018 First Round (2009, 2010, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2018)237160030.43
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 6 2009 2018 First Round (2009, 2010, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2018)246180025.00
Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh 3 2014 2018 First Round (2014, 2016, 2018)132110015.38
Cricket Ireland flag.svg  Ireland 3 2014 2018 First Round (2014, 2016, 2018)13013000.00

Note:

A Super Over, also called a one-over eliminator or officially a one over per side eliminator or Oopse, is a tie-breaking method used in limited-overs cricket matches, where both teams play a single, additional over of six balls to determine the winner of the match. A match which goes to a Super Over is officially declared a "tie", and won by the team who scored the most runs in the Super Over. If the Super Over also ends in a tie, the winner is typically decided by the number of boundaries scored throughout the match.

Team results by tournament

The table below provides an overview of the performances of teams in the ICC World Twenty20. For each tournament, the number of teams in each finals tournament (in brackets) are shown.

Legend
Team Flag of England.svg
2009
(8)
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg
2010
(8)
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg
2012
(8)
Flag of Bangladesh.svg
2014
(10)
Flag of India.svg
2016
(10)
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg
2018
(10)
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
2020
(10)
Total
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia SFCCCRUCQ7
Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh ×××R1R1R13
Flag of England.svg  England CR1RURUSFRUQ7
Flag of India.svg  India SFSFR1R1R1SFQ7
Cricket Ireland flag.svg  Ireland ×××R1R1R13
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand RURUSFR1SFR1Q7
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan R1R1R1R1R1R1Q7
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa R1R1R1SFR1R1Q7
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka R1R1R1R1R1R1Q7
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies R1SFSFSFCSFQ7

Debut of teams

Team appearing for the first time, in alphabetical order per year.

YearDebutantsTotal
2009 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia, Flag of England.svg  England, Flag of India.svg  India, Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand, Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan, Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa, Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka, WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies 8
2010 none0
2012 none0
2014 Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh, Cricket Ireland flag.svg  Ireland 2
2016 none0
2018 none0
2020 Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea or Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 1
Total11

Other results

Results of host teams

YearHost TeamFinish
2009 Flag of England.svg  England Champions
2010 WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies Semi Finalists
2012 Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka Round 1
2014 Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh Round 1
2016 Flag of India.svg  India Round 1
2018 WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies Semi Finalists

Results of defending champions

YearDefending championsFinish
2010 Flag of England.svg  England Round 1
2012 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Champions
2014 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Champions
2016 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Runners-up
2018 WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies Semi Finalists

Awards and achievements

Player of the tournament

YearPlayerPerformance details
2009 Flag of England.svg Claire Taylor 199 runs
2010 Flag of New Zealand.svg Nicola Browne 9 wickets
2012 Flag of England.svg Charlotte Edwards 172 runs
2014 Flag of England.svg Anya Shrubsole 13 wickets
2016 WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg Stafanie Taylor 246 runs and 8 wickets
2018 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Alyssa Healy 225 runs

Most runs in the tournament

YearPlayerPerformance details
2009 Flag of New Zealand.svg Aimee Watkins 200 runs
2010 Flag of New Zealand.svg Sara McGlashan 147 runs
2012 Flag of England.svg Charlotte Edwards 172 runs
2014 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Meg Lanning 257 runs
2016 WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg Stafanie Taylor 246 runs
2018 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Alyssa Healy 225 runs

Most wickets in the tournament

YearPlayerPerformance details
2009 Flag of England.svg Holly Colvin 9 wickets
2010 Flag of India.svg Diana David
Flag of New Zealand.svg Nicola Browne
9 wickets
2012 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Julie Hunter 11 wickets
2014 Flag of England.svg Anya Shrubsole 13 wickets
2016 Flag of New Zealand.svg Leigh Kasperek
Flag of New Zealand.svg Sophie Devine
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg Deandra Dottin
9 wickets
2018 WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg Deandra Dottin
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Ashleigh Gardner
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Megan Schutt
10 wickets

Player of the final

YearPlayerPerformance details
2009 Flag of England.svg Katherine Brunt 3 wickets
2010 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Ellyse Perry 3 wickets
2012 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Jess Cameron 45 runs
2014 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Sarah Coyte 3 wickets
2016 WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg Hayley Matthews 66 runs and 1 wicket
2018 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Ashleigh Gardner 33 runs and 3 wickets

See also

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References

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  2. "Most wickets in the ICC Women's T20 World Cup". ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 25 November 2018.
  3. "World T20 renamed as T20 World Cup".
  4. "World T20 to be called T20 World Cup from 2020 edition: ICC".
  5. Women's World T20 / Records / Result summary – ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 24 November 2018.