Women's Cricket World Cup

Last updated

ICC Women's Cricket World Cup
Administrator International Cricket Council
Format ODI
First edition 1973 Flag of England.svg  England
Latest edition 2017 Flag of England.svg  England & Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales
Next edition 2022 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
Number of teams (see list below)
Current championFlag of England.svg  England (4th title)
Most successfulFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia (6 titles)
Most runs Flag of New Zealand.svg Debbie Hockley (1,501)
Most wickets Flag of Australia (converted).svg Lyn Fullston (39)

The ICC Women's Cricket World Cup is the sport's oldest world championship, with the first tournament held in England in 1973. Matches are played as One Day Internationals (ODIs) over 50 overs, while there is also another championship for Twenty20 International cricket, the ICC Women's T20 World Cup.

Contents

The World Cup is currently organised by the International Cricket Council (ICC). Until 2005, when the two organisations merged, it was administered by a separate body, the International Women's Cricket Council (IWCC). The first World Cup was held in England in 1973, two years before the inaugural men's tournament. The event's early years were marked by funding difficulties, which meant several teams had to decline invitations to compete and caused gaps of up to six years between tournaments. However, since 2005 World Cups have been hosted at regular four-year intervals.

Qualification for the World Cup is through the ICC Women's Championship and the World Cup Qualifier. The composition of the tournament is extremely conservative – no new teams have debuted in the tournament since 1997, and since 2000 the number of teams in the World Cup has been fixed at eight. However, in March 2021, the ICC revealed that the tournament would expand to 10 teams from the 2029 edition. [1] [2] The 1997 edition was contested by a record eleven teams, the most in a single tournament to date. [3]

The eleven World Cups played to date have been held in five countries, with India and England having hosted the event three times. Australia are the most successful team, having won six titles and failed to make the final on only three occasions. England (four titles) and New Zealand (one title) are the only other teams to have won the event, while India (twice) and the West Indies (once) have each reached the final without going on to win.

History

First World Cup

Women's international cricket was first played in 1934, when a party from England toured Australia and New Zealand. The first Test match was played on 28–31 December 1934, and was won by England. [4] The first Test against New Zealand followed early the following year. These three nations remained the only Test playing teams in women's cricket until 1960, when South Africa played a number of matches against England. [4] Limited overs cricket was first played by first-class teams in England in 1962. [5] Nine years later, the first international one day match was played in men's cricket, when England took on Australia at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. [6]

Talks began in 1971 about holding a World Cup for women's cricket, led by Jack Hayward. [7] South Africa, under pressure from the world for their apartheid laws, were not invited to take part in the competition. [8] Both of the other two Test playing nations, Australia and New Zealand were invited. Hayward had previously organised tours of the West Indies by England women, and it was from this region that the other two competing nations were drawn; Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago. To make up the numbers, England also fielded a "Young England" team, and an "International XI" was also included. [7] Five South Africans were invited to play for the International XI as a means of compensation for the team not being invited, but these invitations were later withdrawn. [8]

The inaugural tournament was held at a variety of venues across England in June and July 1973, [9] two years before the first men's Cricket World Cup was played. [10] The competition was played as a round-robin tournament, and the last scheduled match was England against Australia. Australia went into the game leading the table by a solitary point: they had won four matches and had one abandoned. England had also won four matches, but they had lost to New Zealand. [9] [11] As a result, the match also served as a de facto final for the competition. England won the match, held at Edgbaston, Birmingham by 92 runs to win the tournament. [12]

Finals

YearHost(s)Final venueFinal
WinnersResultRunners-up
1973 Flag of England.svg  England No finalFlag of England.svg  England
20 points
England won on points
table
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
17 points
1978 Flag of India.svg  India No finalFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
6 points
Australia won on points
table
Flag of England.svg  England
4 points
1982 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Christchurch Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
152/7 (59 overs)
Australia won by 3 wickets
scorecard
Flag of England.svg  England
151/5 (60 overs)
1988 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Melbourne Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
129/2 (44.5 overs)
Australia won by 8 wickets
scorecard
Flag of England.svg  England
127/7 (60 overs)
1993 Flag of England.svg  England London Flag of England.svg  England
195/5 (60 overs)
England won by 67 runs
scorecard
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
128 (55.1 overs)
1997 Flag of India.svg  India Kolkata Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
165/5 (47.4 overs)
Australia won by 5 wickets
scorecard
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
164 (49.3 overs)
2000 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Lincoln Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
184 (48.4 overs)
New Zealand won by 4 runs
scorecard
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
180 (49.1 overs)
2005 Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa Centurion Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
215/4 (50 overs)
Australia won by 98 runs
scorecard
Flag of India.svg  India
117 (46 overs)
2009 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Sydney Flag of England.svg  England
167/6 (46.1 overs)
England won by 4 wickets
scorecard
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
166 (47.2 overs)
2013 Flag of India.svg  India Mumbai Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
259/7 (50 overs)
Australia won by 114 runs
scorecard
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies
145 (43.1 overs)
2017 Flag of England.svg  England London Flag of England.svg  England
228/7 (50 overs)
England won by 9 runs
scorecard
Flag of India.svg  India
219 (48.4 overs)
2022 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Christchurch

Results

Thirteen nations have qualified for the Women's Cricket World Cup at least once (excluding qualification tournaments). Five teams have competed in every finals tournament, three of which have won the title.

Teams' performances

Legend
Team Flag of England.svg
1973
(7)
Flag of India.svg
1978
(4)
Flag of New Zealand.svg
1982
(5)
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
1988
(5)
Flag of England.svg
1993
(8)
Flag of India.svg
1997
(11)
Flag of New Zealand.svg
2000
(8)
Flag of South Africa.svg
2005
(8)
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
2009
(8)
Flag of India.svg
2013
(8)
Flag of England.svg
2017
(8)
Total
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 2nd1st1st1st3rd1st2nd1st4th1stSF11
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 7th9th2
Flag of England.svg  England 1st2nd2nd2nd1stSF5thSF1st3rd1st11
Flag of India.svg  India 4th4th4thSFSF2nd3rd7th2nd9
Cricket Ireland flag.svg  Ireland 4th5thQF7th8th5
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 5th8thQF8th4
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 3rd3rd3rd3rd2nd2nd1stSF2nd4th5th11
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 11th5th8th8th4
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa QFSF7th7th6thSF6
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka QF6th6th8th5th7th6
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies 6th10th5th6th2nd6th6
Defunct teams
International XI 4th5th2
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 6th1
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 5th1
Flag of England.svg Young England 7th1

Debutant teams

YearTeams
1973Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia, Flag of England.svg  England, Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand, Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica , Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago
1978Flag of India.svg  India
1982none
1988Cricket Ireland flag.svg  Ireland, Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
1993Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark, WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies
1997Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan, Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa, Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka

No longer exists.

Overview

The table below provides an overview of the performances of teams over past World Cups, as of the end of group stage of the 2017 tournament. Teams are sorted by best performance, then by appearances, total number of wins, total number of games, and alphabetical order respectively.

AppearancesStatistics
TeamTotalFirstLatestBest performanceMat.WonLostTieNRWin%*
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 11 1973 2017 Champions(1978, 1982, 1988, 1997, 2005, 2013)8470111285.47
Flag of England.svg  England 11 1973 2017 Champions(1973, 1993, 2009, 2017)8357232175.04
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 11 1973 2017 Champions(2000)8051262165.82
Flag of India.svg  India 9 1978 2017 Runners-up(2005, 2017)6334271155.64
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies 6 1993 2017 Runners-up(2013)3813240135.13
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 6 1997 2017 Semi-finals(2000, 2017)3815220340.54
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 4 1997 2017 Super 6s(2009)232210008.69
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka 6 1997 2017 Quarter-finals(1997)358260123.52
Cricket Ireland flag.svg  Ireland 5 1988 2005 Quarter-finals(1997)347260121.21
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 4 1988 2000 Quarter-finals(1997)262240007.69

International XI

2 1973 1982 First Round(1973, 1982)183140116.66
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 2 1993 1997 First Round(1993, 1997)132110015.38
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 1 1973 1973 First Round(1973)6240033.33
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 1 1973 1973 First Round(1973)5140020.00
Flag of England.svg Young England 1 1973 1973 First Round(1973)6150016.66

No longer exists.

Awards

Player of the Tournament

YearPlayerPerformance details
1988 Flag of England.svg Carole Hodges 336 Runs/12 Wickets
1993 Flag placeholder.svg
1997 Flag placeholder.svg
2000 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Lisa Keightley 375 Runs
2005 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Karen Rolton 246 Runs
2009 Flag of England.svg Claire Taylor 324 Runs
2013 Flag of New Zealand.svg Suzie Bates 407 Runs
2017 Flag of England.svg Tammy Beaumont 410 Runs

Player of the Final

YearPlayerPerformance details
1982 Flag placeholder.svg
1988 Flag placeholder.svg
1993 Flag of England.svg Jo Chamberlain 38 (33) / 1/28 (9)
1997 Flag of New Zealand.svg Debbie Hockley 79 (121)
2000 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Belinda Clark 91 (102)
2005 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Karen Rolton 107* (128)
2009 Flag of England.svg Nicky Shaw 4/34 (8.2)
2013 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Jess Cameron 75 (76)
2017 Flag of England.svg Anya Shrubsole 6/46 (9.4)

Tournament records

World Cup records
Batting
Most runs Debbie Hockley Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 1,5011982–2000 [13]
Highest average (min. 10 innings) Karen Rolton Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 74.921997–2009 [14]
Highest score Belinda Clark Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 229 * 1997 [15]
Highest partnership Tammy Beaumont & Sarah Taylor Flag of England.svg  England 2752017 [16]
Most runs in a tournament Debbie Hockley Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 4561997 [17]
Bowling
Most wickets Lyn Fullston Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 391982–1988 [18]
Lowest average (min. 500 balls bowled) Katrina Keenan Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 9.721997–2000 [19]
Best bowling figures Jackie Lord Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 6/101982 [20]
Most wickets in a tournament Lyn Fullston Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 231982 [21]
Fielding
Most dismissals (wicket-keeper) Jane Smit Flag of England.svg  England 401993–2005 [22]
Most catches (fielder) Janette Brittin Flag of England.svg  England 191982–1997 [23]
Team
Highest scoreFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia (v Denmark)412/31997 [24]
Lowest scoreFlag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan (v Australia)271997 [25]
Highest win %Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 85.97 [26]

See also

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Bibliography