Jones County, Texas

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Jones County, Texas
Jones County Courthouse Anson Texas 2009.JPG
Jones County Courthouse in Anson, Texas
Map of Texas highlighting Jones County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of USA TX.svg
Texas's location within the U.S.
Founded1881
Named for Anson Jones
Seat Anson
Largest city Stamford
Area
  Total937.1 sq mi (2,427 km2)
  Land928.6 sq mi (2,405 km2)
  Water8.6 sq mi (22 km2), 0.9%
Population
  (2010)20,202
  Density22/sq mi (8/km2)
Congressional district 19th
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5
Website www.co.jones.tx.us

Jones County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 20,202. [1] Its county seat is Anson. [2] The county was created in 1858 and organized in 1881. [3] Both the county and its county seat are named for Anson Jones, the fifth president of the Republic of Texas. [4]

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Texas State of the United States of America

Texas is the second largest state in the United States by both area and population. Geographically located in the South Central region of the country, Texas shares borders with the U.S. states of Louisiana to the east, Arkansas to the northeast, Oklahoma to the north, New Mexico to the west, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas to the southwest, and has a coastline with the Gulf of Mexico to the southeast.

Contents

Jones County is included in the Abilene, TX Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Abilene, Texas City in Texas, United States

Abilene is a city in Taylor and Jones counties in Texas, United States. The population was 117,463 at the 2010 census, making it the 27th-most populous city in the state of Texas. It is the principal city of the Abilene Metropolitan Statistical Area, which had a 2017 estimated population of 170,219. It is the county seat of Taylor County. Dyess Air Force Base is located on the west side of the city.

Abilene metropolitan area Metropolitan area in Texas, United States

The Abilene metropolitan statistical area is a metropolitan area in west central Texas that covers three counties—Taylor, Jones, and Callahan. As of the 2010 census, the MSA had a population of 165,252.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 937 square miles (2,430 km2), of which 929 square miles (2,410 km2) are land and 8.6 square miles (22 km2) (0.9%) are covered by water. [5]

Major highways

Texas State Highway 6 highway in Texas

State Highway 6 runs from the Red River, the Texas–Oklahoma boundary, to northwest of Galveston, where it is known as the Old Galveston Highway. In Sugar Land and Missouri City, it is known as Alvin-Sugarland Road and runs perpendicular to I-69/US 59. In the Houston area, it runs north to FM 1960, then northwest along US Highway 290 to Hempstead, and south to Westheimer Road and Addicks, and is known as Addicks Satsuma Road. In the Bryan–College Station area, it is known as the Earl Rudder Freeway. In Hearne, it is known as Market Street. In Calvert, it is known as Main Street. For most of its length, SH 6 is not a limited-access road.

Texas State Highway 92 highway in Texas

State Highway 92 or SH 92 is a state highway that runs 38 miles (61 km) between Stamford and Rotan, Texas. SH 92 was originally designated in 1923-1924 from Bronson to Hemphill. SH 92 was also designated on March 17, 1924 between Stamford and Hamlin. For 3 months, there were two highways numbered SH 92. On June 16, 1924, the SH 92 from Bronson to Hemphill was cancelled, leaving only one SH 92 from Stamford to Hamlin. On February 9, 1933, there was a proposed extension southwest to Longworth. On July 15, 1935, the section from Hamlin to Longworth was cancelled. On August 2, 1937, SH 92 extended from Hamlin to Rotan.

Adjacent counties

Haskell County, Texas County in the United States

Haskell County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 5,899. The county seat is Haskell. The county was created in 1858 and later organized in 1885. It is named for Charles Ready Haskell, who was killed in the Goliad massacre.

Shackelford County, Texas County in the United States

Shackelford County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 3,378. Its county seat is Albany. The county was created in 1858 and later organized in 1874. Shackelford is named for Dr. Jack Shackelford, a Virginia physician who equipped soldiers at his own expense to fight in the Texas Revolution.

Callahan County, Texas County in the United States

Callahan County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 13,544. Its county seat is Baird. The county was founded in 1858 and later organized in 1877. It is named for James Hughes Callahan, an American soldier in the Texas Revolution.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 546
1890 3,797595.4%
1900 7,05385.8%
1910 24,299244.5%
1920 22,323−8.1%
1930 24,2338.6%
1940 23,378−3.5%
1950 22,147−5.3%
1960 19,299−12.9%
1970 16,106−16.5%
1980 17,2687.2%
1990 16,490−4.5%
2000 20,78526.0%
2010 20,202−2.8%
Est. 201620,009 [6] −1.0%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
1850–2010 [8] 2010–2014 [1]

As of the census [9] of 2000, 20,785 people, 6,140 households, and 4,525 families resided in the county. The population density was 22 people per square mile (9/km²). The 7,236 housing units averaged 8 per square mile (3/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 78.80% White, 11.51% Black or African American, 0.49% Native American, 0.47% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 7.46% from other races, and 1.27% from two or more races. About 20.9% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Census Acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population

A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agriculture, business, and traffic censuses. The United Nations defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years. United Nations recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practice.

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

Of the 6,140 households, 33.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.60% were married couples living together, 10.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.30% were not families. About 24.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the county, the population was distributed as 22.50% under the age of 18, 11.10% from 18 to 24, 31.50% from 25 to 44, 21.00% from 45 to 64, and 14.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 150.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 159.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,572, and for a family was $35,391. Males had a median income of $26,892 versus $17,829 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,656. About 13.10% of families and 16.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.70% of those under age 18 and 16.60% of those age 65 or over.

Government and infrastructure

The Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) operates the Robertson Unit prison, and the Middleton Unit transfer unit is in Abilene and in Jones County. [10] [11] [12]

Susan King has been since 2007 the Republican state representative from Jones County, as well as Nolan and Taylor Counties. [13]

Politics

Up until 2000, Jones County was primarily Democratic similar to numerous counties in the Solid South, only voting for Republican presidential candidates five times from 1912 to 1996. Starting in 2000, the county has become strongly Republican, with the margin of victory for the party's candidates increasing with each passing election.

Presidential election results
Presidential election results [14]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 80.9%4,81915.7% 9363.4% 205
2012 76.6%4,26222.0% 1,2261.4% 79
2008 72.4%4,20326.3% 1,5281.3% 77
2004 71.7%4,25428.0% 1,6580.3% 19
2000 67.5%4,08031.4% 1,8991.1% 69
1996 43.5% 2,35144.8%2,42211.8% 637
1992 35.2% 2,08840.5%2,40024.3% 1,444
1988 50.7%3,00049.0% 2,8980.3% 18
1984 62.9%4,01736.7% 2,3430.4% 23
1980 47.1% 2,76551.8%3,0431.1% 66
1976 38.3% 2,07261.3%3,3180.5% 26
1972 75.1%3,20224.6% 1,0500.3% 11
1968 33.7% 1,67647.6%2,37218.7% 931
1964 26.3% 1,29573.6%3,6220.1% 3
1960 44.0% 2,19655.6%2,7720.4% 18
1956 44.3% 2,07355.5%2,5940.2% 10
1952 52.2%2,94147.6% 2,6800.2% 12
1948 10.3% 43286.2%3,5993.5% 146
1944 8.8% 36183.0%3,4178.2% 339
1940 9.8% 40190.1%3,6880.1% 5
1936 8.2% 30591.7%3,3960.1% 2
1932 7.0% 22492.0%2,9340.9% 30
1928 56.0%1,99543.8% 1,5630.2% 8
1924 15.4% 56681.9%3,0102.8% 101
1920 11.8% 27078.5%1,7929.6% 220
1916 5.3% 11484.2%1,79810.5% 224
1912 3.9% 6380.4%1,30115.8% 255

Communities

Cities

Unincorporated communities

Notable residents

See also

Related Research Articles

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Robertson County, Texas County in the United States

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Madison County, Texas County in the United States

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Hartley County, Texas County in the United States

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Anson County, North Carolina County in the United States

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Coleman, Texas City in Texas, United States

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Anson, Texas City in Texas, United States

Anson is a city in and the county seat of Jones County, Texas, United States. The population was 2,430 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Abilene, Texas metropolitan area. Originally named "Jones City", the town was renamed "Anson" in 1882 in honor of Anson Jones, the last president of the Republic of Texas.

Hawley, Texas City in Texas, United States

Hawley is a city in Jones County, Texas, United States. The population was 634 at the 2010 census. Named for Congressman Robert B. Hawley, it is part of the Abilene metropolitan area.

Albany, Texas City in Texas, United States

Albany is a city in Shackelford County, Texas, United States. The population was 2,034 at the 2010 Census. It is the county seat of Shackelford County.

Hamlin, Texas City in Texas, United States

Hamlin is a city in Jones and Fisher Counties in the U.S. state of Texas. The population was 2,124 at the 2010 census, and in 2017, the estimated population was 2,018. The Jones County portion of Hamlin is part of the Abilene, Texas metropolitan area.

Lueders, Texas City in Texas, United States

Lueders is a city in Jones and Shackelford counties in the U.S. state of Texas. The population was 346 at the 2010 census. The portion of Lueders located in Jones County is part of the Abilene, Texas metropolitan area.

References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 12, 2011. Retrieved December 18, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved May 24, 2015.
  4. Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 170.
  5. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 2, 2015.
  6. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  7. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved May 2, 2015.
  8. "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved May 2, 2015.
  9. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  10. "Super Neighborhood Areas Archived 2011-06-09 at the Wayback Machine ." (Direct map link Archived 2011-06-09 at the Wayback Machine ) City of Abilene. Retrieved on July 23, 2010.
  11. "Robertson Unit Archived 2010-07-25 at the Wayback Machine ." Texas Department of Criminal Justice . Retrieved on July 23, 2010.
  12. "Middleton Unit Archived 2010-07-25 at the Wayback Machine ." Texas Department of Criminal Justice . Retrieved on July 23, 2010.
  13. "Susan King". Texas Legislative Reference Library. Retrieved March 12, 2014.
  14. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 11 April 2018.

Coordinates: 32°44′N99°53′W / 32.74°N 99.88°W / 32.74; -99.88