Sutton County, Texas

Last updated

Sutton County
2019 Sutton County Courthouse.jpg
The Sutton County Courthouse in Sonora
Map of Texas highlighting Sutton County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Texas in United States.svg
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 30°30′N100°32′W / 30.5°N 100.54°W / 30.5; -100.54
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Texas.svg  Texas
Founded1890
Named for John S. Sutton
Seat Sonora
Largest citySonora
Area
  Total1,454 sq mi (3,770 km2)
  Land1,454 sq mi (3,770 km2)
  Water0.5 sq mi (1 km2)  0.03%%
Population
 (2010)
  Total4,128
  Density2.8/sq mi (1.1/km2)
Time zone UTC−6 (Central)
  Summer (DST) UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district 23rd
Website www.co.sutton.tx.us
Mercantile Garden, located at the foot of the hill containing the Sutton County Courthouse Mercantile Garden, Sonora, TX IMG 1365.JPG
Mercantile Garden, located at the foot of the hill containing the Sutton County Courthouse
The Sutton County Library in Sonora Sutton County, TX, Public Library IMG 1372.JPG
The Sutton County Library in Sonora
Veterans & Pioneer Ranch Women Museum in Sonora Veterans and Pioneer Ranch Women Museum, Sonora, TX IMG 1377.JPG
Veterans & Pioneer Ranch Women Museum in Sonora

Sutton County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,128. [1] Its county seat is Sonora. [2] The county was created in 1887 and organized in 1890. [3] Sutton County is named for John S. Sutton, an officer in the Confederate Army.

Contents

History

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,454 square miles (3,770 km2), of which 1,454 square miles (3,770 km2) is land and 0.5 square miles (1.3 km2) (0.03%) is water. [15]

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1890 658
1900 1,727162.5%
1910 1,569−9.1%
1920 1,5981.8%
1930 2,80775.7%
1940 3,97741.7%
1950 3,746−5.8%
1960 3,738−0.2%
1970 3,175−15.1%
1980 5,13061.6%
1990 4,135−19.4%
2000 4,077−1.4%
2010 4,1281.3%
Est. 20183,758 [16] −9.0%
U.S. Decennial Census [17]
1850–2010 [18] 2010–2014 [1]

As of the census [19] of 2000, there were 4,077 people, 1,515 households, and 1,145 families residing in the county. The population density was 3 people per square mile (1/km²). There were 1,998 housing units at an average density of 1 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 45.28% White, 0.25% Black or African American, 0.42% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 2.27% from other races, and 1.62% from two or more races. 49.99% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,515 households out of which 38.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.60% were married couples living together, 7.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.40% were non-families. 22.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the county, the population was spread out with 28.80% under the age of 18, 6.70% from 18 to 24, 27.70% from 25 to 44, 24.40% from 45 to 64, and 12.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 99.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $34,385, and the median income for a family was $38,143. Males had a median income of $31,193 versus $18,587 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,105. About 14.10% of families and 18.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.20% of those under age 18 and 16.10% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Sutton County is served by the Sonora Independent School District based in Sonora.

Communities

City

Ghost Towns

Politics

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [20]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 75.9%1,07522.1% 3132.0% 28
2012 74.5%1,11024.8% 3690.8% 12
2008 75.4%1,18924.1% 3810.5% 8
2004 80.7%1,17319.3% 280
2000 69.0%1,06330.4% 4680.6% 9
1996 52.8%68839.0% 5088.1% 106
1992 43.0%68732.8% 52424.2% 387
1988 63.4%99636.4% 5710.2% 3
1984 72.7%1,25127.0% 4650.3% 5
1980 66.2%1,00032.1% 4851.7% 26
1976 51.7%83147.7% 7680.6% 10
1972 73.7%70525.6% 2450.7% 7
1968 45.3%41238.6% 35116.2% 147
1964 34.0% 35766.0%694
1960 48.0% 43752.0%474
1956 65.2%54634.6% 2900.2% 2
1952 62.3%58137.7% 351
1948 21.1% 13169.6%4339.3% 58
1944 18.6% 11870.6%44910.9% 69
1940 12.8% 8486.9%5710.3% 2
1936 13.9% 6486.2%398
1932 23.3% 11376.7%372
1928 75.9%29024.1% 92
1924 46.1% 12453.2%1430.7% 2
1920 34.1% 10462.3%1903.6% 11
1916 9.1% 1390.9%130
1912 13.0% 1267.4%6219.6% 18

See also

Related Research Articles

Cochise County, Arizona County in the Arizona, US

Cochise County is located in the southeastern corner of the U.S. state of Arizona. The population was 131,346 at the 2010 census. The county seat is Bisbee.

Santa Cruz County, Arizona county in Arizona, US

Santa Cruz is a county in southern Arizona. As of the 2010 census, its population is 47,420. The county seat is Nogales. The county was established in 1899. It borders Pima County to the north and west, Cochise County to the east, and the Mexican state of Sonora to the south.

Shackelford County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Shackelford County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 3,378. Its county seat is Albany. The county was created in 1858 and later organized in 1874. Shackelford is named for Dr. Jack Shackelford, a Virginia physician who equipped soldiers at his own expense to fight in the Texas Revolution.

Schleicher County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Schleicher County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 3,461. Its county seat is Eldorado. The county was created in 1887 and organized in 1901. It is named for Gustav Schleicher, a German immigrant who became a surveyor and politician.

Reagan County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Reagan County is a county on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 3,367. The county seat is Big Lake. The county is named after John Henninger Reagan (1818-1905), who was the postmaster general of the Confederate States and also a U.S. Senator, U.S. Representative, and first chairman of the Railroad Commission of Texas.

Menard County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Menard County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 2,242. Its seat is Menard. The county was created in 1858 and later organized in 1871. It is named for Michel Branamour Menard, the founder of Galveston, Texas.

Mason County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Mason County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. At the 2010 census, its population was 4,012. Its county seat is Mason. The county is named for Fort Mason, which was located in the county.

Kinney County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Kinney County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 3,598. Its county seat is Brackettville. The county was created in 1850 and later organized in 1874. It is named for Henry Lawrence Kinney, an early settler.

Hill County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Hill County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 35,089. Its county seat is Hillsboro. The county is named for George Washington Hill, secretary of war and secretary of the navy under the Republic of Texas. Hill County is part of Central Texas, though not included in Texas Hill Country.

Garza County, Texas County in Texas

Garza County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 6,461. Its county seat is Post. The county was created in 1876 and later organized in 1907. Garza is named for a pioneer Bexar County family, as it was once a part of that county. It is located southeast of Lubbock.

Edwards County, Texas County in Texas

Edwards County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 2,002. The county seat is Rocksprings. The county was created in 1858 and later organized in 1883. It is named for Haden Edwards, an early settler of Nacogdoches, Texas. The Edwards Aquifer and Edwards Plateau are named after the county by reason of their locations.

Crockett County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Crockett County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 3,719. The county seat is Ozona. The county was founded in 1875 and later organized in 1891. It is named in honor of Davy Crockett, the legendary frontiersman who died at the Battle of the Alamo.

Cooke County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Cooke County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. At the 2010 census, its population was 38,437. The county seat is Gainesville. The county was founded in 1848 and organized the next year. It is named for William Gordon Cooke, a soldier during the Texas Revolution. It is a part of the Texoma region.

Colorado County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Colorado County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 20,874. Its county seat is Columbus. It is named for the Colorado River of Texas. The county was founded in 1836 and organized the next year.

Brazos County, Texas county in Texas, United States

Brazos County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 194,851. The population estimate as of July 2018 was 226,758. The county seat is Bryan. Along with Brazoria County, the county is named for the Brazos River, which forms its western border. The county was formed in 1841 and organized in 1843.

Eddy County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

Eddy County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 53,829. Its county seat and largest city is Carlsbad. The county was created in 1891 and later organized in 1892. It is north of the Texas state line.

Burnet, Texas City in Texas, United States

Burnet is a city in and the county seat of Burnet County, Texas, United States. The population was 5,987 at the 2010 census.

Fort Davis, Texas Census-designated place in Texas, United States

Fort Davis is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Jeff Davis County, Texas, United States. The population was 1,201 at the 2010 census, up from 1,050 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Jeff Davis County. It was the site of Fort Davis, established in 1854 on the San Antonio–El Paso Road through west Texas and named after Jefferson Davis, who was then the Secretary of War under President Franklin Pierce.

Sonora, Texas City in Texas, United States

Sonora is a city in and the county seat of Sutton County, Texas, United States. The population was 3,027 at the 2010 census.

Mabank, Texas Town in Texas, United States

Mabank is a town in Henderson and Kaufman counties in the U.S. state of Texas. The population was 3,035 at the 2010 census, up from 2,151 at the 2000 census.

References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 24, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved May 26, 2015.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Hosmer, Brian C. "Sutton County, Texas". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 30 November 2010.
  5. Smith, Julia Cauble. "Devils River". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 30 November 2010.
  6. Skiles, Jack; Kelton, Elmer (1996). Judge Roy Bean Country. Texas Tech University Press. p. 45. ISBN   978-0-89672-369-6.
  7. Uglow, Loyd and Loyd M (2001). Standing in the Gap: Army Outposts, Picket Stations, and the Pacification of the Texas Frontier, 1866-1886. Texas Christian University. p. 62. ISBN   978-0-87565-246-7.
  8. "Wentworth - Sonora, Sutton County, Texas". Texas Historical Markers. William Nienke, Sam Morrow. Archived from the original on 18 July 2011. Retrieved 30 November 2010.
  9. "Sonora, Texas". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 30 November 2010.
  10. Lackey, Jerry (21 December 2009). "HOMESTEAD: 'Stockman's Paradise' true to the past". San Angelo Standard Times.
  11. "Sonora Municipal Airport". AirNav. Retrieved 30 November 2010.
  12. "History Caverns of Sonora". Caverns of Sonora. Retrieved 30 November 2010.
  13. "NPS Caverns of Sonora". National Park Service. Retrieved 30 November 2010.
  14. "William Douglas Noël". The Handbook of Texas . Retrieved June 27, 2011.
  15. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 10, 2015.
  16. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 4, 2019.
  17. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 10, 2015.
  18. "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved May 10, 2015.
  19. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  20. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 11 April 2018.

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Sutton County, Texas at Wikimedia Commons

Coordinates: 30°30′N100°32′W / 30.50°N 100.54°W / 30.50; -100.54