Sutton County, Texas

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Sutton County, Texas
Sutton county courthouse 2009.jpg
The Sutton County Courthouse in Sonora
Map of Texas highlighting Sutton County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of USA TX.svg
Texas's location within the U.S.
Founded1890
Seat Sonora
Largest citySonora
Area
  Total1,454 sq mi (3,766 km2)
  Land1,454 sq mi (3,766 km2)
  Water0.5 sq mi (1 km2), 0.03%
Population
  (2010)4,128
  Density2.8/sq mi (1.1/km2)
Congressional district 23rd
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5
Website www.co.sutton.tx.us
Mercantile Garden, located at the foot of the hill containing the Sutton County Courthouse Mercantile Garden, Sonora, TX IMG 1365.JPG
Mercantile Garden, located at the foot of the hill containing the Sutton County Courthouse
The Sutton County Library in Sonora Sutton County, TX, Public Library IMG 1372.JPG
The Sutton County Library in Sonora
Veterans & Pioneer Ranch Women Museum in Sonora Veterans and Pioneer Ranch Women Museum, Sonora, TX IMG 1377.JPG
Veterans & Pioneer Ranch Women Museum in Sonora

Sutton County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,128. [1] Its county seat is Sonora. [2] The county was created in 1887 and organized in 1890. [3] Sutton County is named for John S. Sutton, an officer in the Confederate Army.

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.

Edwards Plateau

The Edwards Plateau is a region of west-central Texas which is bounded by the Balcones Fault to the south and east, the Llano Uplift and the Llano Estacado to the north, and the Pecos River and Chihuahuan Desert to the west. San Angelo, Austin, San Antonio and Del Rio roughly outline the area. The eastern portion of the plateau is known as the Texas Hill Country.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Contents

History

Paleo-Indians classification term given to the first peoples who entered the American continents

Paleo-Indians, Paleoindians or Paleoamericans is a classification term given by scholars to the first peoples who entered, and subsequently inhabited, the Americas during the final glacial episodes of the late Pleistocene period. The prefix "paleo-" comes from the Greek adjective palaios (παλαιός), meaning "old" or "ancient". The term "Paleo-Indians" applies specifically to the lithic period in the Western Hemisphere and is distinct from the term "Paleolithic".

Midden old dump for domestic waste

A midden is an old dump for domestic waste which may consist of animal bone, human excrement, botanical material, mollusc shells, sherds, lithics, and other artifacts and ecofacts associated with past human occupation.

Mortar and pestle equipment consisting of a bowl in which substances are ground using a pestle

Mortar and pestle are implements used since ancient times to prepare ingredients or substances by crushing and grinding them into a fine paste or powder in the kitchen, medicine and pharmacy. The mortar is a bowl, typically made of hard wood, metal, ceramic, or hard stone, such as granite. The pestle is a heavy and blunt club-shaped object. The substance to be ground, which may be wet or dry, is placed in the mortar, where the pestle is pressed and rotated onto it until the desired texture is achieved.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,454 square miles (3,770 km2), of which 1,454 square miles (3,770 km2) is land and 0.5 square miles (1.3 km2) (0.03%) is water. [15]

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Schleicher County, Texas County in the United States

Schleicher County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 3,461. Its county seat is Eldorado. The county was created in 1887 and organized in 1901. It is named for Gustav Schleicher, a German immigrant who became a surveyor and politician.

Kimble County, Texas County in the United States

Kimble County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 4,607. Its county seat is Junction. The county was created in 1858 and organized in 1876. It is named for George C. Kimble, who died at the Battle of the Alamo.

Edwards County, Texas County in the United States

Edwards County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 2,002. The county seat is Rocksprings. The county was created in 1858 and later organized in 1883. It is named for Haden Edwards, an early settler of Nacogdoches, Texas. The Edwards Aquifer and Edwards Plateau are named after the county by reason of their locations.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1890 658
1900 1,727162.5%
1910 1,569−9.1%
1920 1,5981.8%
1930 2,80775.7%
1940 3,97741.7%
1950 3,746−5.8%
1960 3,738−0.2%
1970 3,175−15.1%
1980 5,13061.6%
1990 4,135−19.4%
2000 4,077−1.4%
2010 4,1281.3%
Est. 20163,869 [16] −6.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [17]
1850–2010 [18] 2010–2014 [1]

As of the census [19] of 2000, there were 4,077 people, 1,515 households, and 1,145 families residing in the county. The population density was 3 people per square mile (1/km²). There were 1,998 housing units at an average density of 1 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 45.28% White, 0.25% Black or African American, 0.42% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 2.27% from other races, and 1.62% from two or more races. 49.99% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Census Acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population

A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agriculture, business, and traffic censuses. The United Nations defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years. United Nations recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practice.

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

There were 1,515 households out of which 38.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.60% were married couples living together, 7.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.40% were non-families. 22.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.15.

Marriage Social union or legal contract between people called spouses that creates kinship

Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock, is a socially or ritually recognised union between spouses that establishes rights and obligations between those spouses, as well as between them and any resulting biological or adopted children and affinity. The definition of marriage varies around the world not only between cultures and between religions, but also throughout the history of any given culture and religion, evolving to both expand and constrict in who and what is encompassed, but typically it is principally an institution in which interpersonal relationships, usually sexual, are acknowledged or sanctioned. In some cultures, marriage is recommended or considered to be compulsory before pursuing any sexual activity. When defined broadly, marriage is considered a cultural universal. A marriage ceremony is known as a wedding.

In the county, the population was spread out with 28.80% under the age of 18, 6.70% from 18 to 24, 27.70% from 25 to 44, 24.40% from 45 to 64, and 12.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 99.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $34,385, and the median income for a family was $38,143. Males had a median income of $31,193 versus $18,587 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,105. About 14.10% of families and 18.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.20% of those under age 18 and 16.10% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Sutton County is served by the Sonora Independent School District based in Sonora.

Communities

City

Ghost Towns

Politics

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [20]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 75.9%1,07522.1% 3132.0% 28
2012 74.5%1,11024.8% 3690.8% 12
2008 75.4%1,18924.1% 3810.5% 8
2004 80.7%1,17319.3% 280
2000 69.0%1,06330.4% 4680.6% 9
1996 52.8%68839.0% 5088.1% 106
1992 43.0%68732.8% 52424.2% 387
1988 63.4%99636.4% 5710.2% 3
1984 72.7%1,25127.0% 4650.3% 5
1980 66.2%1,00032.1% 4851.7% 26
1976 51.7%83147.7% 7680.6% 10
1972 73.7%70525.6% 2450.7% 7
1968 45.3%41238.6% 35116.2% 147
1964 34.0% 35766.0%694
1960 48.0% 43752.0%474
1956 65.2%54634.6% 2900.2% 2
1952 62.3%58137.7% 351
1948 21.1% 13169.6%4339.3% 58
1944 18.6% 11870.6%44910.9% 69
1940 12.8% 8486.9%5710.3% 2
1936 13.9% 6486.2%398
1932 23.3% 11376.7%372
1928 75.9%29024.1% 92
1924 46.1% 12453.2%1430.7% 2
1920 34.1% 10462.3%1903.6% 11
1916 9.1% 1390.9%130
1912 13.0% 1267.4%6219.6% 18

See also

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References

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  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
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  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Hosmer, Brian C. "Sutton County, Texas". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 30 November 2010.
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  13. "NPS Caverns of Sonora". National Park Service. Retrieved 30 November 2010.
  14. "William Douglas Noël". The Handbook of Texas . Retrieved June 27, 2011.
  15. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 10, 2015.
  16. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  17. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 10, 2015.
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  20. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 11 April 2018.

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Sutton County, Texas at Wikimedia Commons

Coordinates: 30°30′N100°32′W / 30.50°N 100.54°W / 30.50; -100.54