Tom Green County, Texas

Last updated
Tom Green County
San Angelo September 2019 11 (Tom Green County Courthouse).jpg
Tom Green County Courthouse in San Angelo
Tom Green County tx seal.jpg
Seal
Map of Texas highlighting Tom Green County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Texas in United States.svg
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 31°25′N100°28′W / 31.41°N 100.46°W / 31.41; -100.46
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Texas.svg  Texas
Founded1875
Named for General Thomas Green
Seat San Angelo
Largest citySan Angelo
Area
  Total1,541 sq mi (3,990 km2)
  Land1,522 sq mi (3,940 km2)
  Water19 sq mi (50 km2)  1.2%%
Population
 (2010)
  Total110,224
  Density72/sq mi (28/km2)
Time zone UTC−6 (Central)
  Summer (DST) UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district 11th
Website www.co.tom-green.tx.us
Judge Michael D. Brown Justice Center across from the Tom Green County Courthouse San Angelo September 2019 06 (Judge Michael D. Brown Justice Center).jpg
Judge Michael D. Brown Justice Center across from the Tom Green County Courthouse

Tom Green County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 110,224. [1] Its county seat is San Angelo. [2] The county was created in 1874 and organized the following year. [3]

Contents

Tom Green County is included in the San Angelo, TX Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History

The county was established by the state legislature on March 13, 1874, and named after Thomas Green, a Confederate brigadier general. It originally comprised an area over 60,000 square miles (160,000 km2).

The original county seat was the town of Ben Ficklin. In 1882, flood waters of the Concho River destroyed the town and drowned 65 people. The county seat was moved to San(ta) Angela. In 1883, the town's name was officially changed to San Angelo by the United States Post Office.

Tom Green County has a long, narrow strip of land extending to the west. This unusual feature is because Reagan County to the west used to be part of Tom Green County, and the state of Texas required that all counties have a contiguous land route to their county seat. Therefore, the small strip of land served to connect the two main regions. In 1903, the residents of the western section voted to form their own county (Reagan County), while in the same vote it was decided that the connecting strip would remain as part of Tom Green County. [4]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,541 square miles (3,990 km2), of which 1,522 square miles (3,940 km2) are land and 19 square miles (49 km2) (1.2%) are covered by water. [5]

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 3,615
1890 5,15242.5%
1900 6,80432.1%
1910 17,882162.8%
1920 15,210−14.9%
1930 36,033136.9%
1940 39,3029.1%
1950 58,92949.9%
1960 64,6309.7%
1970 71,0479.9%
1980 84,78419.3%
1990 98,45816.1%
2000 104,0105.6%
2010 110,2246.0%
Est. 2018118,189 [6] 7.2%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
1850–2010 [8] 2010–2014 [1]

As of the census [9] of 2000, 104,010 people, 39,503 households, and 26,783 families resided in the county. The population density was 68 people per square mile (26/km2). There were 43,916 housing units at an average density of 29 per mi2 (11/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 50.76% White, 5.13% Black or African American, 0.65% Native American, 0.86% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 12.82% from other races, and 2.39% from two or more races. About 30.71% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race, 13.2% were of German, 10.7% American, 8.2% English and 7.2% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000.

Of the 39,503 households, 33.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.10% were married couples living together, 11.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.20% were not families. About 27.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.09.

In the county, the population age was distributed as 26.10% under the age of 18, 12.80% from 18 to 24, 27.10% from 25 to 44, 20.60% from 45 to 64, and 13.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $33,148, and for a family was $39,482. Males had a median income of $27,949 versus $20,683 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,325. About 11.20% of families and 15.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.20% of those under age 18 and 11.80% of those age 65 or over.

Education

View from U.S. Highway 87 northwest of San Angelo in Tom Green County U.S. Hwy. 87 north of San Angelo, TX IMG 1399.JPG
View from U.S. Highway 87 northwest of San Angelo in Tom Green County

These school districts serve Tom Green County:

Colleges

Communities

Former Texas Theater in downtown San Angelo San Angelo September 2019 13 (Texas Theatre).jpg
Former Texas Theater in downtown San Angelo

City

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Ghost town

Military base

Politics

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [10]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 71.5%27,49423.8% 9,1734.7% 1,812
2012 73.2%26,87825.3% 9,2941.5% 548
2008 70.4%27,36228.7% 11,1580.9% 341
2004 75.3%28,18524.1% 9,0070.6% 225
2000 71.4%24,73326.8% 9,2881.8% 605
1996 55.2%18,11235.9% 11,7828.9% 2,914
1992 40.8%14,98931.1% 11,43728.1% 10,313
1988 63.1%21,46336.1% 12,2830.8% 266
1984 72.5%23,84727.3% 8,9810.3% 82
1980 60.7%16,55536.3% 9,8923.0% 824
1976 52.3%12,31647.0% 11,0640.7% 174
1972 71.9%15,78427.7% 6,0820.4% 95
1968 49.6%9,68234.7% 6,77415.8% 3,080
1964 40.5% 6,66459.4%9,7670.1% 12
1960 53.6%8,17646.1% 7,0310.3% 39
1956 64.6%9,07035.1% 4,9230.3% 40
1952 62.5%9,69837.4% 5,7970.2% 24
1948 20.0% 1,82274.3%6,7775.7% 517
1944 13.5% 1,12575.5%6,27210.9% 909
1940 14.0% 1,04985.8%6,4330.2% 15
1936 11.4% 62787.3%4,8031.3% 69
1932 12.9% 73986.8%4,9570.3% 18
1928 63.1%2,61836.8% 1,5280.1% 2
1924 19.8% 55475.7%2,1164.4% 124
1920 15.5% 25676.6%1,2647.9% 130
1916 6.5% 9288.2%1,2435.3% 75
1912 4.5% 5081.2%90614.3% 160

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 26, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved May 27, 2015.
  4. "Abilene Reporter-News". Abilene Reporter-News. Retrieved 9 April 2018.
  5. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 11, 2015.
  6. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 4, 2019.
  7. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 11, 2015.
  8. "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved May 11, 2015.
  9. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  10. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 9 April 2018.

Coordinates: 31°25′N100°28′W / 31.41°N 100.46°W / 31.41; -100.46