Nawzad District

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Nawzad

نوزاد
District
Nowzad.jpg
A US Marine combat engineer in Now Zad in December 2009.
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Nawzad
Coordinates: 32°13′14″N64°34′36″E / 32.2205°N 64.5768°E / 32.2205; 64.5768
Country Flag of Afghanistan.svg  Afghanistan
Province Helmand Province
Population
 (2012) [1]
  Total49,500

Nawzad [2] is a district in the north of Helmand Province, Afghanistan. Its population, which is 100% Pashtun, was estimated at 49,500 [1] in 2012. The district centre is the village of Nawzad; there are 14 other large villages and over 100 smaller settlements.

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Nowzad or Nawzad or Nauzad may refer to:

Events in the year 2018 in Afghanistan.

References

  1. 1 2 "Settled Population of Helmand Province" (PDF). Central Statistics Organization. Retrieved 21 December 2015.
  2. "District Profile" (PDF). UNHCR. Retrieved 1 August 2006.